Politics

  • Managing Rivalry With China
    July 2020

    Managing Rivalry With China

    The United States finds itself at a geostrategic crossroads. The key global issue is whether the U.S. and China can manage their relations without a war, which history shows usually results when a rising power challenges the status-quo power.
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  • The Chinese Exclusion Act
    July 2020

    The Chinese Exclusion Act

    In 1882 congress took steps to control Chinese immigration with the passage of “An Act to execute certain treaty stipulations relating to Chinese.” The act later became known misleadingly as the Chinese Exclusion Act.
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  • Greater Than the French Revolution
    July 2020

    Greater Than the French Revolution

    At the time, the Franco-Prussian War was a shocking and apocalyptic global event. We should not expect any explosion of commemoration on this 150th anniversary, but such neglect is badly mistaken.
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  • Madison Avenue's Soviet Mole
    July 2020

    Madison Avenue's Soviet Mole

    In his latest book, Klehr attempts to wrap up a long preoccupation with the enigmatic spy David Karr, an American who collaborated with the Soviet Union for a number of years until his death in 1979.
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  • What Made the Founders Happy
    July 2020

    What Made the Founders Happy

    Conklin seeks to harmonize the intellectual strains about what consitituted “the good life” which informed the political discourse of early America. She examines British legal thought as embodied in the work of Blackstone and then turns to classical…
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  • Remembering James Burnham

    Remembering James Burnham

    James Burnham gave us an understanding of what he termed the “managerial revolution,” in which the bourgeoisie has been replaced by a new class of managerial elites, educated technocrats that specialize in the management of large organizations.
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  • Cultural Radicalism Is the Problem, Not Bolshevism
    July 2020

    Cultural Radicalism Is the Problem, Not Bolshevism

    Today's cultural upheaval is not about Marxism, but the cultural radicalism of America's wealthy elites. The moneyed advocates of gay marriage and transgendered rights have abandoned the traditions of those devout Christians who created this country.
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  • <em>Black Power</em> and the 1619 Project
    June 2020

    Black Power and the 1619 Project

    Radically recasting America’s formative years would be damaging enough, but The New York Times’ “1619 Project” is applying that same radical intellectual perspective on American history to contemporary social issues and problems.
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  • Defense of Bill Buckley

    Defense of Bill Buckley

    It is hard to know where to begin in responding to Jack Trotter’s profile of a founding father of the modern conservative movement (“Remembering William F. Buckley, Jr.,” April/May 2020).
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  • Looking for Moral Foundations (in All the Wrong Places)
    June 2020

    Looking for Moral Foundations (in All the Wrong Places)

    Some conservatives claim that America's moral foundations are established in the Constitution and enforced in the courts, rather than its culture, religion, and people. They may be barking up the wrong tree.
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  • Monocultural Resilience
    June 2020

    Monocultural Resilience

    At the end of the ongoing global melodrama’s first quarter, it seems reasonable to predict that this will be a two-act play with the final curtain coming down in July. It will end as a tragedy, not because the outcome was preordained…
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  • Virginia's Creeping Authoritarianism
    June 2020

    Virginia's Creeping Authoritarianism

    Even before the nationwide government crackdown in the wake of the COVID-19 virus, the unprecedented reaction of Virginia’s government against civilian protesters showcased the potential for authoritarianism to rear its head in America…
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  • The Mind Behind Big Brother
    June 2020

    The Mind Behind Big Brother

    Few works in literature are as terrifying as 1984, that look into the future written by George Orwell and published in 1949. British scholar Dorian Lynskey unravels the novel’s themes, inspirations, and intentions in his latest book.
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  • Remembering the Southern Agrarians

    Remembering the Southern Agrarians

    In 1920 a group of writers gathered in Nashville for bi-weekly sessions of reading and dissecting each other’s prose and poetry. The group, who defended the traditional Southern way of life, became known as the Southern Agrarians.
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  • Go Big or Go Home
    June 2020

    Go Big or Go Home

    Trump risks becoming another Herbert Hoover, reviled for decades. His best chance at reelection is to move from a fitful embrace of a variety of nationalist policies to a full-throated advocacy of American nationalism.
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  • Remembering Whittaker Chambers

    Remembering Whittaker Chambers

    At first glance, the personal history of Whittaker Chambers does not suggest a conservative frame of mind.
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  • Trump's Presidency Hangs on One Decision
    April/May 2020

    Trump's Presidency Hangs on One Decision

    Six weeks ago, Trump was boasting, and justifiably so, of having the greatest economy of any president in recent memory. Now, the possibility exists that he could go into the fall election with the worst economy since Hoover and the Great...
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  • The Old Left Wasn't Very Leftist
    April/May 2020

    The Old Left Wasn't Very Leftist

    It would be impossible to imagine any shared moral ground between the left that existed in the 1930s and what today presents itself as their intellectual descendants.
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  • Kissinger's Call for a New World Order
    April/May 2020

    Kissinger's Call for a New World Order

    Kissinger has declared that it is now an imperative that the world's leaders, even as they deal with the raging pandemic, begin to make the "transition to the post-coronavirus order."
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  • What Has COVID-19 Done to Our Money?
    April/May 2020

    What Has COVID-19 Done to Our Money?

    While left and right squabble over the right approach to COVID-19, the Fed prints the U.S. dollar into oblivion.
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  • The Unclubbable
    April/May 2020

    The Unclubbable

    The late Joe Sobran used to refer to liberal high society as "the hive.” What Joe was highlighting were certain qualities that he associated with the fashionable left, e.g., extreme clannishness, the exclusion of those who deviated from...
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  • Polemics & Exchanges
    April/May 2020

    Polemics & Exchanges

    Prof. Brion McClanahan answers a critic of his "Reinventing Reconstruction" article in the February number
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  • #MeToo for Me, But Not for Thee
    April/May 2020

    #MeToo for Me, But Not for Thee

    Human nature does not change, at least not where the Hollywood types who hung around with Harvey Weinstein are concerned. Hypocrisy, not talent, is the number one commodity in Tinseltown.
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  • The Geopolitics of Coronavirus
    April/May 2020

    The Geopolitics of Coronavirus

    The contours of COVD-19's geopolitical impact are becoming apparent in the rapidly changing patterns of mental mapping, political decision-making, and economic flows in the three panregions that matter in today’s world: Asia-Pacific, Europe, and...
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  • Letter from Twickenham: In Deepest Remainland
    April/May 2020

    Letter from Twickenham: In Deepest Remainland

    One would be hard pressed to find a more pleasant London neighborhood than the leafy suburb of Twickenham, where this author resides. Situated on the Thames River and immersed in history, Twickenham was for years a bastion of conservatism. In the...
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  • Faux Originalism
    April/May 2020

    Faux Originalism

    Is Antonin Scalia’s originalism—indeed, constitutional self-government itself—passé? The eternal temptation to read one’s own values into the Constitution beguiles even religious conservatives espousing natural law.
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  • Fatal Amendments
    April/May 2020

    Fatal Amendments

    Enthusiastic defenders of the First and Second Amendments to the Constitution are fundamentalist cultists—and women and minorities are their victims. At least, that is the thesis of University of Miami law professor Mary Anne Franks’ new book,...
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  • Remembering Willmoore Kendall
    April/May 2020

    Remembering Willmoore Kendall

    Among the 20th-century conservative movement’s legendary leaders, Willmoore Kendall (1909-1967) stands out as the one who most effectively offered a grounding in a specifically American philosophy. There is also a timeliness in this remarkable...
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  • Remembering William F. Buckley, Jr.
    April/May 2020

    Remembering William F. Buckley, Jr.

    Two years after the death of the man whom one of his biographers, John Judis, dubbed the patron saint of modern conservatism, Encounter Books brought out a splendidly packaged omnibus volume of his columns and essays, entitled Athwart History:...
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  • Is the Pandemic Killing Biden's Bid?
    March 2020

    Is the Pandemic Killing Biden's Bid?

    Trump's presidency will stand or fall on the resolution of the coronavirus crisis and how Trump is perceived as having led us in that battle.
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  • The Politics of the Coronavirus
    March 2020

    The Politics of the Coronavirus

    In the United States, political biases have also been evident in responses to the virus. Republicans are stressing the dire economic consequences of the shutdown and warn about doing irreparable destruction to our material well-being.
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  • The Nation-State Is Back
    March 2020

    The Nation-State Is Back

    Neoliberal globalization in its post-Cold War form has been dealt a mortal blow by COVID-19, which is a good thing. The architecture of global economic and political governance developed over the past three decades is collapsing before our eyes.
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  • Can This Pandemic Usher in a New Era?
    March 2020

    Can This Pandemic Usher in a New Era?

    Nations seem to be recognizing and responding to the grim new geostrategic reality of March 2020: The pandemic is the real enemy of us all, and while we fight it, each in his own national corner, we are in this together.
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  • Must We Kill the Economy To Kill the Virus?
    March 2020

    Must We Kill the Economy To Kill the Virus?

    President Trump is said to be privately expressing a deepening concern at the damage the coronavirus shutdown is doing to the U.S. economy and debating whether it can be safely reopened. Though castigated for his remark, Trump has a point.
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  • Are Americans All-In for a Long Coronavirus War?
    March 2020

    Are Americans All-In for a Long Coronavirus War?

    Will Americans suffer in social isolation, inside their own homes for months, while a state-induced Great Depression washes over the land?
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  • What Globalism Has Wrought
    March 2020

    What Globalism Has Wrought

    No matter whether one believes the actual threat has been overstated, we can only hope that the troubles unleashed by the fear of the coronavirus will lead to a serious re-evaluation of the entire globalist project, as well as to serious...
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  • The Knack of the Non-Deal
    March 2020

    The Knack of the Non-Deal

    An Arab-Israeli peace agreement is like a moderate Syrian rebel or rational leftist: It is possible to visualize, but producing one is daunting. Every attempt has failed. President Donald Trump’s “Peace to Prosperity” plan will be no...
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  • Brexit Got Done, Now Get Over It
    March 2020

    Brexit Got Done, Now Get Over It

    The great 2016 vote-undoing project seems at long last to have been abandoned on both sides of the Atlantic. In Washington, President Trump’s impeachment fizzled out—a strange and pathetic affair however you look at it. Everyone is looking past...
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  • Vestigial Reds
    March 2020

    Vestigial Reds

    Diana West should be a familiar name to anyone who has studied the operation of the American Communist movement. Two of her books, America Betrayed: The Secret Assault on our Nation’s Character (2013) and The Red Thread (2019) examine the...
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  • Tariffs Work
    March 2020

    Tariffs Work

    For decades, American political discourse has largely operated within the spectrum of opinions voiced by the editorial pages of The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Wall Street Journal. Opinions not embraced by one of these newspapers...
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  • Bad Intel
    March 2020

    Bad Intel

    A pair of recent news items unintentionally demonstrated the ways the Intelligence Community is a primary source of our confused foreign policy in the Middle East, while also undermining President Trump here at home.
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  • <em>First Things</em> First
    March 2020

    First Things First

    After people gather into groups they formulate their own founding myths. The veracity of these stories is of secondary importance to their ability to tie people to a sense of noble purpose, shared sacrifice, and confidence that their activities...
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  • Historical Revisionism on the Right
    March 2020

    Historical Revisionism on the Right

    Nietzsche writes in the concluding section of Twilight of the Idols, “One does not learn from the Greeks—their way is too alien, and also too fluid, to have an imperative effect, a ‘classical’ effect.” The divide between Greek antiquity and...
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  • It's Not Okay to Be White
    February 2020

    It's Not Okay to Be White

    The left now roundly denounces anyone to the right of Jeb Bush as a “white nationalist,” which it appears is now being equated with “white supremacist,” with the apparently immortal Adolph Hitler acting as the once-and-future ringleader of a...
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  • Afghan Disinformation
    February 2020

    Afghan Disinformation

    During the Second World War the German High Command issued regular bulletins about the situation on various fronts. They had a triumphalist tone in 1940, when France fell, and in 1941, when it looked like the Red Army would collapse, but the core...
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  • A New Right Arises in Poland
    February 2020

    A New Right Arises in Poland

    The year 2019 was an eventful one in Polish politics. Out of a boring and meaningless dispute between two wings of Polish liberalism, there arose a new political force determined to shake up Poland’s political culture. Eleven MPs from the new...
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  • The Reinvention of Reconstruction
    February 2020

    The Reinvention of Reconstruction

    American conservatives have rightly viewed the post-Civil War Reconstruction period as a tragic era rife with corruption, scandal, mismanagement, and unconstitutional uses of power at both the state and federal level. Unfortunately, many have...
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  • The Hijacking of Nationalist Conservativism
    December 2019

    The Hijacking of Nationalist Conservativism

    The 2016 election planted a nationalistic, populist battle standard reminiscent of the one that the pitchfork-wielding legions of the Old Right had once marched beneath. Now it appears at risk of being diluted and neutralized, as populist right-wing
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  • Impeachment, Just and Unjust
    November 2019

    Impeachment, Just and Unjust

    What exactly did the framers mean by putting in the Constitution Article II, Section 4? This is the section that reads, “The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for,...
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  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    November 2019

    Books in Brief

    Paul Gottfried on National Populism and the Revolt Against Liberal Democracy by Roger Eatwell and Matthew Goodwin. Peter Hammack on Prosperity: Better Business Makes the Greater Good by Colin Mayer.
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  • Ohio Gets Nice on Crime
    November 2019

    Ohio Gets Nice on Crime

    In my new home of Ashland, Ohio, there is a sign that welcomes all comers to “The World Headquarters of Nice People.” It seemed to me as if the entire town conspired to make my move as pleasant as could be. This is “Midwestern Nice” in a...
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  • Impure Politics
    November 2019

    Impure Politics

    In criminal law, there are times when a crime has clearly been committed, but it’s not clear whether the perpetrator had criminal intent. The impeachment effort against Donald Trump is the opposite situation: a case where there is no high...
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  • Amazon Fires Spark Global Hysteria
    October 2019

    Amazon Fires Spark Global Hysteria

    The afternoon of Monday, August 19, I was at home in my apartment in the city center of São Paulo. Glancing out the window, I noticed the sky was unusually dark. I figured it was about to rain, so I told my children we had to cancel our trip to...
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  • The Epstein Enigma
    October 2019

    The Epstein Enigma

    According to the official narrative, on Aug. 10, 2019, Jeffrey Epstein, the billionaire playboy charged with sex-trafficking minors, committed suicide in his jail cell at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in New York City. Only a third of American
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  • Perot, the Proto-Trump
    September 2019

    Perot, the Proto-Trump

    One evening in the fall of 2015, with the unlikely Donald J. Trump already dominating the race for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination, I ran into Ross Perot, Jr., at an exclusive charity event in Dallas. Perot is a billionaire real...
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  • Big Tech Joins the Culture War
    July 2019

    Big Tech Joins the Culture War

    The Silicon Valley censors have struck again. This time it’s against James O’Keefe’s Project Veritas for sins related to the practice of journalism, namely publishing documents allegedly exposing anti-Christian bias on the social media platform Pinte
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  • Republic of War
    July 2019

    Republic of War

    For a pacific, commercial republic protected by two giant oceans and two peaceful neighbors with small militaries, America sure has fought a lot of wars. Michael Beschloss’s Presidents of War details eight American leaders beginning in 1807 who...
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  • We Ought to Like Ike
    July 2019

    We Ought to Like Ike

    As a second-year West Point cadet in March 1969, I was returning to my room after chemistry class midafternoon on a Friday. As I stepped inside Pershing Barracks, I saw a number of cadets huddled around a note posted on the stairway railing.
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  • Revisiting Suffrage
    July 2019

    Revisiting Suffrage

    One hundred years have now passed since both houses of Congress passed the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution granting women the right to vote. For a long time, both major parties were ready to grant the suffrage, should American women...
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  • 'Brazilian Trump' Rides Wave of Low Expectations
    July 2019

    'Brazilian Trump' Rides Wave of Low Expectations

    Jair Bolsonaro’s election to the presidency of Brazil last year provoked a media meltdown similar to Donald Trump’s victory in 2016.
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  • Farage’s European Victory Upends British Politics
    July 2019

    Farage’s European Victory Upends British Politics

    When the 751 Members of the new European Parliament (MEPs) gather in the French city of Strasbourg on July 2, the largest national group present in all the EU will be the MEPs of Britain’s new Brexit Party led by Nigel Farage.
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  • U.S. Economy Nears Growth Record
    July 2019

    U.S. Economy Nears Growth Record

    The U.S. economy, absent a precipitous decline in payroll employment this quarter, will set a momentous record in July: the longest economic expansion in the nation’s 243-year history.
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  • The Price of Overstretch
    July 2019

    The Price of Overstretch

    “Everything in strategy is very simple,” Carl von Clausewitz wrote almost two centuries ago, “but that does not mean that everything is very easy.” The author of On War said it is easy to chart the course of a war once begun, but “great strength...
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  • Orange Monster Charms the Brits
    July 2019

    Orange Monster Charms the Brits

    In early June, British Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt stood on the airport tarmac waiting to greet President Donald Trump. Following the resignation of Theresa May, a Conservative leadership competition was underway, and Hunt was desperate to...
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  • Belgians and Bureaucrats
    July 2019

    Belgians and Bureaucrats

    Some years ago my friend and neighbor Baron Philip Lambert had my wife and me to dinner in his chalet in Gstaad, Switzerland, and the talk turned to Belgian history. Philip’s grandfather, a banker, had lent money to King Leopold II of Belgium to...
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  • College Admissions and Other Rites of Fragility
    June 2019

    College Admissions and Other Rites of Fragility

    Think of the angst the recent college admissions scandal has caused in wealthy households from Greenwich to La Jolla, and nowhere in between, except maybe Winnetka.
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  • Getting Real About Reparations
    June 2019

    Getting Real About Reparations

    The call for slavery reparations is reverberating throughout the land once again. It will be entertaining to watch the Democratic presidential candidates for 2020 position themselves on this topic.
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  • The Art of the No-Deal
    June 2019

    The Art of the No-Deal

    Trump’s decision to walk away from the Hanoi Summit in February and reject the terms of a possible deal—ending all sanctions in return for a partial denuclearization—was a disappointment for his supporters. But it is only the beginning of a...
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  • Covington Catholic and the Hour of Decision
    June 2019

    Covington Catholic and the Hour of Decision

    Except for my time in college and a few years living in Washington, D.C., I have spent my entire life in Central Kentucky. I live less than 90 miles from Covington Catholic High School, and like most Kentuckians, I was familiar with the school ...
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  • Let’s Stop Equating Slavery and Abortion
    June 2019

    Let’s Stop Equating Slavery and Abortion

    Frequently, pro-life leaders draw a parallel between slavery and abortion. “You Say Abortion Is Legal? The Supreme Court Also Legalized Slavery,” reads one popular bumper sticker.
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  • Missing the Main Story
    June 2019

    Missing the Main Story

    In 1946, the U.S. intelligence community published a series of studies on the current and future dangers threatening global peace, and among these was a surprisingly detailed essay entitled, “Islam: A Threat to World Stability.”
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  • Bibi’s Reelection Nixes Peace Plan
    June 2019

    Bibi’s Reelection Nixes Peace Plan

    Early legislative elections in Israel on April 9 have not changed the country’s political landscape. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has been reelected for an unprecedented fourth consecutive term and will soon exceed the late David...
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  • The Left: A History of Violence

    The Left: A History of Violence

    The sight of American leftists getting on their moral high horses to attribute blame to conservatives for the growth of political violence in America is exasperating, to say the least.
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  • The Little Guy and the Right

    The Little Guy and the Right

    To judge from what is going on in Italy, the only major European country where populists are in power, right-wing populism works, but left-wing populism does not.
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  • Manifest(o)
    May 2019

    Manifest(o)

    Whenever an act of violence is committed against Muslims by a non-Muslim, as Brenton Tarrant did in March when he viciously gunned down 50 Muslims at prayer in Christchurch, New Zealand, the left-liberal elites of the West and their...
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  • The End of Politics
    May 2019

    The End of Politics

    Politics are over in America. Political maneuvering will go on, of course, but the old civics-class view of American political life was based on a set of assumptions that are no longer operative.
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  • Not Like the Other
    May 2019

    Not Like the Other

    We often hear opponents of U.S. action abroad denounced as “anti-American.” On the other hand, these alleged anti-Americans present themselves as anti-interventionists—opponents of the policy and not the country. So how to tell the difference?
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  • Stuck in the Middle With May
    May 2019

    Stuck in the Middle With May

    I’m quite moved these days when I meet Americans and they ask me, ever so delicately, “How’s Brexit?” Or: “How’s that Brexit thing going?” Or, “Are you guys going to be OK with the Brexit?”
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  • Deplorable Duke
    May 2019

    Deplorable Duke

    In 1979, as John Wayne was dying, his friend and costar in five movies, Maureen O’Hara, went to Capitol Hill to urge Congress to issue a medal honoring Wayne.
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  • Unplug Your P.C.
    May 2019

    Unplug Your P.C.

    OK, sport fans, get your wallets out and start giving. That’s the latest brainstorm from a New York Times columnist who makes an unconvincing case for reparations to black people.
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  • We’ll Get Him Next Time
    May 2019

    We’ll Get Him Next Time

    After two years and tens of millions of dollars, the Mueller investigation ended in a shattering anticlimax for Democrats. On March 22, Special Counsel Robert Mueller sent Attorney General William Barr his report, and Barr promptly informed...
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  • The Crisis in the Anglosphere
    May 2019

    The Crisis in the Anglosphere

    Pro-democratic ideological think tanks that evaluate the future of democracy by the extent of its global spread and the fortunes of relatively insignificant countries around the world should be far more concerned with events currently occurring...
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  • No Justice, No Peace
    April 2019

    No Justice, No Peace

    There is no pleasing Duke University law professor Brandon L. Garrett, author of the death-penalty-abolishment screed End of Its Rope: How Killing the Death Penalty Can Revive Criminal Justice, though much about the current state of criminal...
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  • Happy Warriors
    April 2019

    Happy Warriors

    For decades, conservative commentators and writers have told anyone who would listen that America is going to hell in a handbag. James Burnham’s Suicide of the West, John Derbyshire’s We Are Doomed, Pat Buchanan’s Suicide of a Superpower, Mark...
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  • The Wall: Moral and Good
    April 2019

    The Wall: Moral and Good

    President Donald Trump’s predecessors have circumvented Congress before on issues the legislative branch had tried to stop. They have redirected resources appropriated by lawmakers.
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  • NeverTrump, No Reserve
    April 2019

    NeverTrump, No Reserve

    The enormity of what we’re up against is something I acknowledge in the abstract, but blank out of my consciousness 99 percent of the time. It’s only when I come across an article like Alexander Rubinstein’s and Max Blumenthal’s recent exposé of...
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  • Uncle Sap Mans Up
    April 2019

    Uncle Sap Mans Up

    Hold the presses! More Germans trust Vladimir Putin’s Russia than Trump’s United States. This is earth-shattering news, a scoop like no other. If this were 1969, the moon landing would be a smaller headline.
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  • Ideologies and Priorities
    April 2019

    Ideologies and Priorities

    Now here’s a headline: “Blackface, sexual assault scandals don’t appear to have tarnished Virginia’s image,” the Washington Post declared on March 3. The story referred to controversies surrounding each of the commonwealth’s three top statewide...
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  • The U.S. and the E.U.
    April 2019

    The U.S. and the E.U.

    Washington never made any particular secret of its jaundiced view of Brexit as suggested succinctly by President Obama when he warned that Great Britain, if she voted to leave the European Union, would need to go to “the back of the queue” of...
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  • The Thousand Faces of “Me”
    April 2019

    The Thousand Faces of “Me”

    In 1976 New York published a lengthy essay, “The ‘Me’ Decade and the Third Great Awakening,” by the reporter and novelist Tom Wolfe, who died last year, aged 88. Wolfe argued that mass prosperity in the postwar era had erased the historical...
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  • Democracy and Infanticide
    April 2019

    Democracy and Infanticide

    During the polar vortex of 2019 the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act had its day in the United States Senate but, thanks to the opposition of Democrats, failed to meet the required number of votes necessary to end debate and call the...
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  • Culture Wars!
    April 2019

    Culture Wars!

    The bitter war of words that has taken place the best part of this past year between France and Italy culminated in the French government taking the extraordinary step of withdrawing its ambassador to Rome in February.
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  • Replacement Theories
    April 2019

    Replacement Theories

    In 2004, Dutch political scientist Cas Mudde published The Populist Zeitgeist, an attempt to define the growingly important but haphazardly applied concept of “populism.” He had an emotional as well as an academic interest, because “far-right”...
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  • Breeze Over the Border With Me
    March 2019

    Breeze Over the Border With Me

    Let’s conduct a thought experiment. Imagine that you have just landed at New York’s JFK International Airport after a 15-hour flight from Mumbai.
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  • Nationalism: More to Learn
    March 2019

    Nationalism: More to Learn

    However much they may enjoy watching Captain von Trapp sing “Edelweiss” in The Sound of Music, most Catholic intellectuals nowadays are squeamish about delving too deeply into the production’s historical background.
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  • Winter of Our Discontent
    March 2019

    Winter of Our Discontent

    As fall turned into winter, there were unmistakable signs of paleoconservative dissatisfaction with President Trump.
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  • Steve Bannon’s Gladiator School: A View From Within
    March 2019

    Steve Bannon’s Gladiator School: A View From Within

    Here, in this huge deserted monastery founded in 1204, which has 15,000 square meters of roof, President Donald Trump’s former chief strategist and the former chief executive of Breitbart News, Stephen K. Bannon, has founded what he told me will...
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  • Secular Nationalism Is Not Enough
    March 2019

    Secular Nationalism Is Not Enough

    The Turkic peoples began as steppe nomads, then became soldiers and eventually farmers and city-dwellers. As they made these transitions they came to dominate ancient centers along the Silk Road.
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  • Chief of Men
    March 2019

    Chief of Men

    Of the making of books about Churchill there is no end. The latest is the best to date. Andrew Roberts reduces Churchill’s epic life to some 1,100 pages, offering a précis of the great events in which he was involved while drawing on 40 new...
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  • Your Pink Hat Is Transphobic
    March 2019

    Your Pink Hat Is Transphobic

    If Madonna were a standard white person, her appearance at the August 2018 MTV Video Music Awards . . . would have brought the leftist brownshirts snarling like rabid coons into the streets and onto the Sunday talk shows.
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  • The Pope and the Art of Self-Deception
    March 2019

    The Pope and the Art of Self-Deception

    Pope Francis, the first Pontiff to visit the Arabian Peninsula, attended a hugely publicized interfaith meeting in the United Arab Emirates on February 4 as part of what the Vatican described as his “outreach to the Muslim world.”
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  • Proceed With the Neverendum
    March 2019

    Proceed With the Neverendum

    It would be fun to write a Westminster column that wasn’t about Brexit. I’m afraid I can’t. Brexit is Britain, to a large extent, these days, at least as far as the news is concerned.
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  • Gillette Meets Dick the Butcher
    March 2019

    Gillette Meets Dick the Butcher

    Everyone’s rather angry nowadays. Women, gays, lesbians, bisexuals, blacks, Hispanics, American Indians, college students, college professors, Hollywood stars, Democratic politicians—you name them, they’re upset.
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  • Blackface—and White
    March 2019

    Blackface—and White

    Dr. Ralph Northam, the Democratic governor of Virginia, aetat. 59, is under enormous pressure to resign his position after a conservative website revealed the fact that his page in his medical school yearbook from 1984 carries a photograph of two...
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  • The Belligerent Advantage of Congress
    March 2019

    The Belligerent Advantage of Congress

    The way foreign-policy mavens in Washington, D.C., talk about Afghanistan, you would think that country had successfully launched a ballistic-missile attack against us on 9/11.
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  • Trump and the Right
    March 2019

    Trump and the Right

    It seems that a part of Donald Trump’s base—the part that writes and otherwise comments on him, anyway—is angry with the President for having reopened the portions of the federal government he had shut down for 35 days after failing to obtain...
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  • Angels of Death, Arrayed in White
    March 2019

    Angels of Death, Arrayed in White

    The state of the Union is divided, as we were reminded not only after but during the President’s speech of February 5. Republicans chanted “USA! USA!” several times in response to lines delivered to elicit the same; Democrats (upon whom the...
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  • An Infrastructure of Crumbs and Bananas
    February 2019

    An Infrastructure of Crumbs and Bananas

    The current American cultural and economic transformation, which arguably started in the late 20th century, is now approaching its nadir. Americans will more likely mourn this transition than celebrate it.
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  • What Beto Revealed
    February 2019

    What Beto Revealed

    For Texas conservatives, a surprisingly strong showing by Democrats in their deep-red state in November’s midterm election was an unexpected wake-up call. The results also set me to thinking about my own personal history with the Lone Star State.
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  • The Fatherland and the Nation
    February 2019

    The Fatherland and the Nation

    Allen Tate, in 1952, argued that the first duty of the man of letters in the postwar world was to purify the language from the corruptions introduced by ideology and the destruction, more than physical, wrought by the recent world war.
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  • What Is Populism?
    February 2019

    What Is Populism?

    Dining out with my wife in a restaurant in Paris recently, I became aware of the well-dressed Frenchman seated with his wife two tables away from us listening in on our conversation. The table for two between us was unoccupied.
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  • The Iceberg Cometh
    February 2019

    The Iceberg Cometh

    Throughout the Introduction and into the first chapter of Ship of Fools you seem to be seated before a television screen listening to, and watching, Tucker Carlson in his nightly broadcast.
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  • Adieu to the “Adults in the Room”
    February 2019

    Adieu to the “Adults in the Room”

    President Donald Trump’s announcement last December 19 that he would immediately withdraw all U.S. forces from Syria (and one-half of the Afghan contingent) is the most important single decision of his presidency.
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  • Throwing Off the Albatross
    February 2019

    Throwing Off the Albatross

    It came as a bolt of lightning out of the blue. One moment the Trump administration was besieged on all sides. The media were accusing him of treason, and the Democrats, having just taken control of the House of Representatives, were promising...
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  • AOC and GOP Suicide
    February 2019

    AOC and GOP Suicide

    As the new Congress was sworn in early in January, the Republican Party unveiled a plan for its own assisted suicide. In fact, Mitt Romney got started before he was even seated as the latest senator from Utah.
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  • Tucker Carlson’s Firebell
    February 2019

    Tucker Carlson’s Firebell

    Tucker Carlson shook the punditariat, liberal and conservative alike, with his incisive analysis, delivered during one of his show monologues, of the breakdown of the American family, a genuine four-alarm crisis that cannot be exaggerated.
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  • Trump’s Razor
    January 2019

    Trump’s Razor

    Blame everything on Trump. Your car won’t start? It’s Trump’s fault. Your dog threw up in the living room? It’s Trump’s fault. The media have lost their collective mind. That’s definitely Trump’s fault. And the blame game seems to get worse by...
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  • Ignoble Savages, Part 1
    January 2019

    Ignoble Savages, Part 1

    Hardly anyone thought much about the mysterious inhabitants of North Sentinel Island, whom we call the Sentinelese (because we have no idea what else to call them), until the close of November in the Year of Our Lord 2018.
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  • The Faults of Woodward and Trump
    January 2019

    The Faults of Woodward and Trump

    There’s a lot of buncombe in Bob Woodward’s Fear: Trump in the White House. Doubtless Chronicles readers heard some of it when the book was released on September 13, as the mainstream media played and replayed on the hour reports of Chief of...
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  • The Empty Plinth
    January 2019

    The Empty Plinth

    With the Midterm Elections safely behind us, should we count on the left to renounce the fun of castigating nonleft types for their racism, sexism, and hetero normativism? Not on a bet.
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  • Displaced Persons
    January 2019

    Displaced Persons

    In an age of anti-elite anger, it might seem otiose to publish an academic analysis of aristocratic ideas in Western thought. But as the post-1945 order rattles itself to pieces, it is time to look past its bankrupted beliefs and discredited...
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  • A Century of Disorder
    January 2019

    A Century of Disorder

    The Paris Peace Conference opened at the Palace of Versailles 100 years ago (January 18, 1919). It was the most ambitious gathering of its kind in history: Leaders and diplomats of 27 nations convened to shape the future, a mere ten weeks after...
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  • Muse of Apollo
    January 2019

    Muse of Apollo

    Is it really necessary to explain why President Trump’s proposed Space Force would be a boon to humankind? Do I have to contrast such a noble project with the other possible uses to which our tax dollars would be put?
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  • Reform Now!
    January 2019

    Reform Now!

    The left can nearly always be relied upon to recognize a new and unprecedented situation when it arises, and to propose that it be met resolutely and “creatively,” as it likes to say. The exceptions come when holding fast to the status quo and...
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  • Not Prudent at That Juncture
    January 2019

    Not Prudent at That Juncture

    Following the death of President George Herbert Walker Bush at age 94, the mainstream press and the television punditariat began treating the occasion as the passing of America’s grandpa.
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  • Deal or No Deal
    January 2019

    Deal or No Deal

    David Cameron, the former Prime Minister, once mocked his fellow Tories for “banging on about Europe.” He meant that the European Union had become a tedious right-wing obsession—the root of all governmental problems, the enemy without, the...
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  • May, Macron—TRUMP
    January 2019

    May, Macron—TRUMP

    Immediately after Emmanuel Macron was elected president of France in May 2017, progressive Americans fairly swooned with envy. If only they could have a president like M. Macron: young, handsome, progressive, cosmopolitan, polished, globally...
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  • Seize No Day
    January 2019

    Seize No Day

    When one is tired of London, said Dr. Johnson, one is tired of life. I spent a week in London last November, a city I have visited many times and know well having lived a year there with my family while I was growing up.
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  • Africa: The Wind of Change
    January 2019

    Africa: The Wind of Change

    “A Manifesto for Renewing Liberalism” is the title of a recent issue (September 13, 2018) of the house journal of liberalism, The Economist. I read this confessional admission with amazement.
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  • Clashes of Cultures
    January 2019

    Clashes of Cultures

    Events this past week in Paris remind me of my step-sister Amanda, Lady Harlech, who is usually described—much to her chagrin—as the “muse” of the 85-year-old gay kaiser of the fashion world, Karl Lagerfeld.
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  • #MeToo: Stalinism in Drag
    January 2019

    #MeToo: Stalinism in Drag

    We live in a Puritan country, in which self-righteousness is eternally wedded to cheap theatrics. This explains the dual phenomena of Meryl Streep and Hollywood’s earnest commitment to distributing her films to every country on the planet.
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  • Citizen Sunflower and America’s Future
    December 2018

    Citizen Sunflower and America’s Future

    Cancer imposes innumerable indignities on its victims. In addition to possible death, the disease, its complications, and its treatment also force patients through the most inhumane gauntlet of our health-care system.
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  • Brazil’s Exceptional President
    December 2018

    Brazil’s Exceptional President

    Jair Bolsonaro won the presidential election in Brazil on October 28 with 55 percent of the vote. The former army captain triumphed over Fernando Haddad of the leftist Workers’ Party pledging to fight crime and corruption, to end affirmative...
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  • Too Dangerous to Read
    December 2018

    Too Dangerous to Read

    I offer a moral dilemma. Are there books or fictional works so dangerous that they should not be taught in school or college, and that should as far as possible be kept from a general audience?
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  • The Boot-Licker
    December 2018

    The Boot-Licker

    A fifth columnist is a supporter or secret sympathizer of an enemy nation, and the phrase was coined by Spanish nationalist general Emilio Mola.
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  • Middle Eastern Blood and Dirt
    December 2018

    Middle Eastern Blood and Dirt

    For over three years Saudi Arabia has been fighting a war in Yemen with little regard for civilian suffering. The war itself has been deadly for thousands of bystanders, but far worse has been the famine the conflict has brought about, which has...
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  • Using the N-word
    December 2018

    Using the N-word

    At a raucous campaign rally in Houston, President Trump laid his ideological cards on the table for all to see. If the Democrats take the House and/or the Senate, he told the crowd, they’ll carry out the agenda of “corrupt, power-hungry globalists.”
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  • Obama’s Pope
    December 2018

    Obama’s Pope

    Mr. Neumayr’s comprehensive and exhaustive work, a fine example of investigative journalism, should deeply worry Catholics, laity and clerics alike.
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  • Six Midterm Reflections
    December 2018

    Six Midterm Reflections

    As the Midterm Election returns came in, one thing became clear: There would be no “blue wave.” The Democrats secured the House of Representatives, though not by a wide margin, and the Republicans held the Senate, gaining a few seats.
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  • The Mightiest Midterm Win
    December 2018

    The Mightiest Midterm Win

    As the Midterm Apocalypse was sliced and diced on the Day After, pundits noted the “Kavanaugh Effect,” whereby Senate Democrats who joined in the smear-and-delay campaign against then-nominee Brett Kavanaugh lost their bids for reelection in...
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  • Obsession!
    November 2018

    Obsession!

    Reading Ann Coulter’s newest polemical masterpiece brings to mind one of her previous ones. I don’t mean her sparkling In Trump We Trust, published just before the 2016 election (and reviewed in this magazine), in which she predicted that the...
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  • Trump’s Doctrinal Problem
    November 2018

    Trump’s Doctrinal Problem

    President Donald Trump’s speech to the U.N. General Assembly on September 25 was met with audible disrespect from some of the assembled globalist cognoscenti (representatives of many barbarous regimes included), and with blind hostility from the...
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  • A Moment of Anticipation
    November 2018

    A Moment of Anticipation

    Are we tired of winning yet? This is the question Donald Trump kept telling us we’d be asking ourselves if he succeeded in taking the White House—and I have to confess the answer is an emphatic “No!”
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  • Thanks, Christine
    November 2018

    Thanks, Christine

    The ugliness displayed by the media and Democrats during the fight over Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court is yet another indicator of how far we have come from Hamilton’s conception of the federal judiciary as “the least...
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  • Tears for Fears
    November 2018

    Tears for Fears

    “A good name is rather to be chosen than great riches,” said wise King Solomon. In the fall of 2018, Democrats pressed with all their might to take Brett Kavanaugh’s good name away, in an effort to retake control of Congress.
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  • Cradle of Empire
    November 2018

    Cradle of Empire

    As of October, the U.S. has been fighting a war in Afghanistan for fully 17 years. Young men who were not even born when the war started are now almost of an age to serve and be deployed.
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  • A Generation in Need of Editing
    November 2018

    A Generation in Need of Editing

    As I noted last month, conservatives in the United States have long ceded the realms of literature and art (here broadly construed to include all forms of imaginative media, including music, theater, and film) to the forces of the left.
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  • The Patriot
    November 2018

    The Patriot

    Italian journalists are forbidden these days from using the Italian word for foreign migrants who have stolen their way by subterfuge into Italy. By controlling which words people can use you can control their thought. It is a thoroughly fascist...
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  • Our Inner Mason-Dixon
    November 2018

    Our Inner Mason-Dixon

    About a hundred years before the Civil War, two British surveyors, Jeremiah Mason and Charles Dixon, with a crew of ax-men, marked out 270 miles of wilderness. They set a stone at every mile, and another grander one embossed with the arms of the...
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  • Vengeance Is Mine, Saith Ms. Jeong
    November 2018

    Vengeance Is Mine, Saith Ms. Jeong

    In Europe some time during the 17th and 18th centuries the class of people who were known after 1789 as “the left” made the shocking discovery that the world is not perfect: not even all it might be but should be and, indeed, can be.
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  • Age of the F-Bomb
    November 2018

    Age of the F-Bomb

    The suppression of manners and the power of the halfwit elite
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  • Campaigning for Narcissists
    November 2018

    Campaigning for Narcissists

    On even-numbered years, particularly the ones coinciding with a presidential midterm, my Deep South home county undergoes the grotesque onslaught of local elections.
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  • Existential Threat
    November 2018

    Existential Threat

    At present, two themes dominate British political news. One is Brexit, which never ends. The other is antisemitism in the Labour Party, which sucks up enormous amounts of media oxygen. It is not clear how much the public cares that much about...
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  • Kavanaugh in Retrospect
    November 2018

    Kavanaugh in Retrospect

    Hours after the U.S. Senate voted to confirm Judge Kavanaugh as the 114th Supreme Court Justice, a commentator on FOX News remarked that no winners had emerged from the legislative ordeal.
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  • American Babel
    November 2018

    American Babel

    Back in June, a belligerent New York City attorney briefly became a symbol of “xenophobia” for those who make it their business to deconstruct what’s left of American identity.
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  • An American Non-Hero
    October 2018

    An American Non-Hero

    Sen. John McCain’s death at 81 on August 25 was followed by effusive praise from everyone who is anyone in the Permanent State. His memorial service at Washington’s National Cathedral on September 1 confirmed that, inside the Beltway, even death...
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  • The Enemy of the People
    October 2018

    The Enemy of the People

    Of all the epithets Donald Trump has delivered over the last 24 months (“Mexican immigrant thieves and rapists,” “shithole countries,” the “Mueller Witch Hunt,” etc.), none has provoked greater outrage on the part of liberals than his...
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  • The Establishment
    October 2018

    The Establishment

    We need a word for the forces that govern our lives. Establishment, a term popularized by Henry Fairlie in the 1950’s, is common currency. He meant by it “the whole matrix of official and social relationships within which power is exercised.”
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  • What Really Happened
    October 2018

    What Really Happened

    I call 2016 the Chronicles Election. The issues discussed in this magazine, often a lonely voice in the wilderness, for more than 30 years finally caught up with the national political discourse and got a president elected.
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  • Drain the Swamp
    October 2018

    Drain the Swamp

    The most remarkable aspect of Bruce Springsteen’s performance at the 2018 Tony Awards wasn’t what he said or that he said it, but the unanimous acclaim with which it was greeted by both the assembled audience and those who viewed it at home.
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  • More Crime, Fewer Cops
    October 2018

    More Crime, Fewer Cops

    Some of you oldsters will never believe this, but London is no longer the place where The Blue Lamp and other black-and-white golden oldies were made.
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  • No Free Ride for Bezos Socialism
    October 2018

    No Free Ride for Bezos Socialism

    Imagine an economic system in which government pays the wages of workers, but the businesses where they work remain privately owned, and profits accrue to the owners. Could this fairly be called free-market capitalism?
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  • Capitol Obsequies
    October 2018

    Capitol Obsequies

    It used to be said of the Anglican Church that it was “the Tory Party at prayer.” On the occasion of Sen. John McCain’s funeral service in Washington National Cathedral last September 1, the United States and the world were given another...
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  • The Voice of Democracy
    October 2018

    The Voice of Democracy

    “Democracy Dies in Darkness,” declares the Washington Post. With apologies to Alexis de Tocqueville, I reply: Doesn’t something have to live first before it can die?
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  • Selling Them the Rope
    September 2018

    Selling Them the Rope

    The United States recently came under an attack by an activity so insidious that Democratic leader Chuck Schumer and his Wisconsin colleague Tammy Baldwin joined forces in an effort to demand it be “reined in.”
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  • Foregone Conclusions
    September 2018

    Foregone Conclusions

    Here’s a question for you: Could the “monster” of the #MeToo movement get a fair trial anywhere in these United States? Is there a potential jury member that has not made up his mind that Harvey Weinstein raped, mistreated, and oppressed women?
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  • Teddy Rebel in Portland
    September 2018

    Teddy Rebel in Portland

    The political establishment in California has become self-admittedly secessionist in recent months, rebelling specifically against federal immigration policy and more broadly by raising the possibility of leaving a backward and reactionary...
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  • The Death Penalty Is Good
    September 2018

    The Death Penalty Is Good

    Pope Francis is wrong to change the Catechism of the Catholic Church to suit his postmodern, antibiblical leanings, making capital punishment utterly “inadmissible” in civil society, like hearsay evidence in court.
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  • Ask Jeeves
    September 2018

    Ask Jeeves

    Some of the best-loved characters in English literature are observed only dimly through the eyes of an unreliable first-person narrator; like fish seen through the glass of a tank, they swim toward us, momentarily dazzling in their colors, before...
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  • Fascism, Real and Imagined
    September 2018

    Fascism, Real and Imagined

    Twenty years ago I somehow managed to get my act together and get out of Paris, where I had haunted a cheap hotel for a year in the wake of the death of Princess Diana like the ghost of the Marlon Brando character in Last Tango in Paris.
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  • I Hate
    September 2018

    I Hate

    A book faces me across the room from a bookcase in my office. It has a blood-red and black cover. The author’s name is printed in black down the upper part of the spine and the title in white below that.
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  • The Ethnic Partitioning of England
    September 2018

    The Ethnic Partitioning of England

    Londonistan: The content is in the book’s title. Melanie Phillips, the author, had great difficulty in finding a publisher; no main house would take it, even though she is a distinguished and successful writer, and in the end it came out in 2006...
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  • An Unsatisfying Quexit
    September 2018

    An Unsatisfying Quexit

    The first problem with Brexit is the word Brexit—one of those stupid portmanteau words, like motel or brunch. It is a joined-up abbreviation of “Britain’s” and “exit from the European Union.”
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  • After Helsinki: A Coup in the Making
    September 2018

    After Helsinki: A Coup in the Making

    President Donald Trump’s meeting with President Vladimir Putin of Russia and their joint press conference in Helsinki on July 16 have ignited an ongoing paroxysm of rage and hysteria in the U.S. media.
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  • Schizophrenic Citizens
    September 2018

    Schizophrenic Citizens

    The very idea of dual citizenship is downright absurd. It’s a contradiction that cannot be resolved. The concept of citizenship is based on the expectation of loyalty to the country, and this, in turn, means that citizens owe their exclusive...
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  • A Man of Inaction
    September 2018

    A Man of Inaction

    In 1912, at dusk walking home, Henry Adams spotted something he thought to be a hippopotamus in the nation’s capital. As he drew nearer he saw it was President Taft.
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  • The Last of the Royals
    September 2018

    The Last of the Royals

    When historians survey Europe’s 20th century, rarely do they question the fundamental evil of the old irrelevant monarchies and aristocratic regimes, and the obvious necessity of replacing them with progressive socialist and nationalist...
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  • The Battle for America’s Mind
    September 2018

    The Battle for America’s Mind

    Heralding the rise of the daily newspaper in 1831, French poet and politician Alphonse de Lamartine declared journalism would emerge as “the whole of human thought,” but that thought itself “will not have time to ripen, to accumulate into the form of
    Read more
  • Erdogan Unleashed
    August 2018

    Erdogan Unleashed

    A successful national leader (“good” or “bad”) is able to redefine the terms of what is politically possible in accordance with his values, and to produce durable desired outcomes. Lincoln, FDR, and Reagan come to mind at home, and Churchill, De...
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  • The Libertarian Trajectory
    August 2018

    The Libertarian Trajectory

    NeverTrump really means “forever war.” Proof of this could be seen in the 2016 election, where anti-Trump Republicans fielded a candidate of their own, ex-CIA man Evan McMullin, rather than casting their votes for a third-party ticket with two...
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  • The Partisans Are Coming!
    August 2018

    The Partisans Are Coming!

    The Referendum that took Great Britain out of the European Union by a large popular majority occurred two years ago. President Trump was elected two years ago this coming November in something like a landslide in the Electoral College.
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  • The Children of Eden
    August 2018

    The Children of Eden

    All of us, I imagine, are granted from time to time moments of uninvited insight that will, for years to come, provide a basis for reflection and a more penetrating glimpse of the forces that shape the realms in which we live and labor.
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  • Fighting for Their Homeland
    August 2018

    Fighting for Their Homeland

    South Africa has rarely been out of the headlines in 2018. In late February, the South African government voted to amend the constitution to allow for the expropriation of land from white farmers without compensation.
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  • Catch, Release, Repeat
    August 2018

    Catch, Release, Repeat

    The photo went viral: a little girl crying after she’d been separated from her mother at the U.S.-Mexican border. Time photoshopped it so that the little girl was crying while the Evil Donald Trump looked down at her, looming over her like some...
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  • The Presidential Style
    August 2018

    The Presidential Style

    “Never lose your temper except on purpose” was a firm maxim of Dwight Eisenhower’s. Donald Trump seems generally to observe the same rule, though certainly not always.
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  • Hungry Heart
    August 2018

    Hungry Heart

    The Hollywood elite has been painfully boring and predictable for decades, and the use of awards ceremonies to deliver political messages is nothing new. But like everything else in the Age of Trump (with the exception of civility), this...
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  • The Truth About Hungary
    August 2018

    The Truth About Hungary

    I met Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbàn in May of last year. With a few others, we shared breakfast before the opening session of the second Budapest Demographic Forum. He was every bit the “footballer” I had been told to expect.
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  • Law and Liberty
    August 2018

    Law and Liberty

    Let’s say that a state passed a statute proscribing teachers from teaching reading in a language other than English until the student had passed the eighth grade. Violation of the statute was a misdemeanor.
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  • From Russia, With Love­—and Hate
    August 2018

    From Russia, With Love­—and Hate

    Russian sexuality and the country’s general mores have become a topic of conversation in the United States, mostly in relation to President Trump’s alleged connections with the Kremlin and his behavior during his trip to Russia some time ago,...
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  • Kavanaugh and the Roe Dance
    August 2018

    Kavanaugh and the Roe Dance

    Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination by President Trump for the blessed vacancy left by retiring justice Anthony Kennedy, author of the civilization-defying Obergefell opinion, supplied the heat necessary to cause the vaunted American melting pot to boil...
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  • Jacob Rees-Mogg’s Conservative Clinic
    July 2018

    Jacob Rees-Mogg’s Conservative Clinic

    As a political phenomenon, “the Moggster,” as he is known, is quite Trumpian. He is wildly popular in a way that the experts cannot understand. As Trump was in 2015, he is dismissed as a ridiculous figure who can’t win.
    Read more
  • The Politics of Morbid Fascination
    July 2018

    The Politics of Morbid Fascination

    Rafael Palmeiro has ED. How do I know? He told me. He told you, too. Heck, he told the whole country about 15 years ago. He went on national television to say that he was having a bit of trouble with his slugging percentage, and that Viagra...
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  • Neocons in the Dark
    July 2018

    Neocons in the Dark

    Republican politicians are all Trumpier-than-thou these days, if they know what’s good for them. The GOP wing of the “Resistance,” represented by Jeff Flake and Bob Corker, are retiring from the field, defeated.
    Read more
  • The Essential Sector
    July 2018

    The Essential Sector

    One of Donald Trump’s signature issues during the presidential campaign was his assertion that bad trade deals had cost millions of American manufacturing jobs, and his promise to do something to reverse that doleful trend.
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  • Trump’s Iranian Gamble
    July 2018

    Trump’s Iranian Gamble

    The conventional view among antiglobalist conservatives is that President Donald Trump’s nixing of the Iran nuclear deal, coupled with the much-heralded relocation of the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem, is bad news.
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  • The Telegraph and the Clothesline
    July 2018

    The Telegraph and the Clothesline

    Communication, in the abstract, is easier today than it has ever been before, largely because of the advance of technology.
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  • The Unhelpful Uncle
    July 2018

    The Unhelpful Uncle

    I recently had a spirited discussion with the British historian James Holland, brother of Tom Holland, also a distinguished man of letters, about FDR, his oil embargo of Japan, and the root causes of World War II.
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  • Immigration and the GOP (Again!)
    July 2018

    Immigration and the GOP (Again!)

    The Republican candidate for President of the United States in 2016 made major immigration restriction the broadest and thickest plank in his platform. That candidate went on to defeat 16 other GOP candidates, all of them to a greater or lesser...
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  • Faith Whittlesey, R.I.P.
    July 2018

    Faith Whittlesey, R.I.P.

    The mice had a problem with Faith Whittlesey. These mice were not the four-legged kind; they were Chief of Staff Donald Regan’s functionaries in the Reagan White House, scurrying around and gnawing away at conservative policy efforts.
    Read more
  • The Siege of Sweden
    July 2018

    The Siege of Sweden

    In an era of political correctness, “safe spaces,” and “trigger warnings” for the constitutionally feeble, there are plenty of things we are not supposed to talk about. Increasingly in recent months, this seems to include crime and immigration...
    Read more
  • Requiem for a Remainer
    July 2018

    Requiem for a Remainer

    It is time to ring down the curtain on the troubled rule of Theresa May. May became Prime Minister as the result of a series of flukes, which a scriptwriter would have dismissed as too implausible to work.
    Read more
  • Syria and Our Deaths of Despair
    June 2018

    Syria and Our Deaths of Despair

    Just two days after the alleged April 9 chemical attack in Douma, Syria, TV host Tucker Carlson asked Mississippi Republican Sen. Roger Wicker, “What is the American national security interest that would be served by regime change in Syria?”
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  • Cultural Marxists and the Stranglehold of “Race”
    June 2018

    Cultural Marxists and the Stranglehold of “Race”

    One of the subjects that most self-styled conservatives seem incapable of discussing in any depth—indeed, it is one they often flee from like mice before the hungry house cat—is race.
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  • One Nation Divided
    June 2018

    One Nation Divided

    Since 1892, when the original text was composed, the Pledge of Allegiance has been revised three times. Viewed chronologically, the alterations appear to have aimed at a greater specificity, but also a wider and deeper self-assurance.
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  • Homesick in America
    June 2018

    Homesick in America

    “Darlin,’” she said, “I’ll get that. Go ahead and take it.” She was a weathered-looking woman with mousy light brown hair drawn back in a bun and the plain, honest look of one of those faces you see in Depression-era photos from the Dust Bowl,...
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  • All About Trump
    June 2018

    All About Trump

    Today, all books by liberals really are about President Trump. Such is Playing With Fire: The 1968 Election and the Transformation of American Politics, by MSNBC far-left fake-news host Lawrence O’Donnell.
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  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    June 2018

    Books in Brief

    This excellent and timely book is of great interest as informed speculation on the future of the United States; at a secondary level, it is a meditation on empire in history.
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  • Calling the Deomocrats’ Bluff
    June 2018

    Calling the Deomocrats’ Bluff

    Rep. Adam Schiff knows something about impeachment. The California Democrat first won his seat in Congress in 2000, when he defeated a Republican incumbent, James Rogan, who two years earlier had been one of the “managers” acting for the House...
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  • Impossible Dreams: The West’s Undying Love Affair With Marx
    June 2018

    Impossible Dreams: The West’s Undying Love Affair With Marx

    Is Marxism Dead? If the average citizen of a Western society were asked that question, it seems to me he would readily answer that Marxism is indeed a very dead idea surviving only in improbable boondocks like North Korea or Cuba, and even there...
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  • Lessons From Libya: How Not to Ruin Syria
    June 2018

    Lessons From Libya: How Not to Ruin Syria

    In the aftermath of the U.S.-led air and missile strikes on Syria for the April incident in which Bashar al-Assad’s government allegedly used chemical weapons against innocent civilians, calls are growing for the Trump administration to deepen...
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  • Monumental Stupidity
    June 2018

    Monumental Stupidity

    There is a scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1959 classic North by Northwest in which the characters look out at a brooding Mount Rushmore from the dining-room terrace of the Sheraton-Johnson Hotel in Rapid City, South Dakota (since renamed the Hotel...
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  • Going in the Wrong Direction
    June 2018

    Going in the Wrong Direction

    Of the more than 1,000 migrants from Central America who set out in “caravan” to traverse the length of Mexico to seek asylum in the United States, a couple of hundred arrived at Tijuana on the American border.
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  • Hogging the Guns

    Hogging the Guns

    Facts ruin bad arguments. So let these facts sink in for a minute. According to the FBI, in 2016 murderers using handguns killed 7, 105 Americans. That same year, murderers using any kind of rifle killed only 374 Americans.
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  • The Lesson From Pennsylvania
    May 2018

    The Lesson From Pennsylvania

    It’s likely that psephologists will discover from their postmortems on the recent primary election in Pennsylvania’s 18th Congressional District that the barely victorious candidate, Conor Lamb, won by appealing to the “nice” Republican portion...
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  • Bannon and the Inquisition
    May 2018

    Bannon and the Inquisition

    There’s nothing more boring than journalists writing about journalism. Please let me tell you, though, about The Spectator’s interview with Steve Bannon, which we published in March.
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  • Taiwan, China, and Unnecessary War

    Taiwan, China, and Unnecessary War

    While America’s attention remains focused on the North Korea crisis, another dangerous East Asia confrontation has re-emerged. The People’s Republic of China (PRC) is taking new steps to intimidate Taiwan and force the island’s leaders to move...
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  • Worse Than a Neocon
    May 2018

    Worse Than a Neocon

    Until March 22, when the White House announced that John Bolton would replace H.R. McMaster as national security advisor, it was still possible to imagine that President Donald Trump’s many compromises with the globalist-hegemonist establishment...
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  • The Liars and the Credulous
    May 2018

    The Liars and the Credulous

    I am writing this very close to March 20, the 15th anniversary of the start of the Iraq war, and I’m wondering: Have we learned anything from that experience?
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  • The Logic of Liberalism
    May 2018

    The Logic of Liberalism

    Writing in this issue of Chronicles, Frank Brownlow, the scholar and literary critic, quotes W.H. Auden as having described logic as “a condition of the world,” like aesthetics and ethics. Auden was right, which makes advanced liberalism’s...
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  • The Pursuit of Happiness
    April 2018

    The Pursuit of Happiness

    Mass shootings of the sort that happened recently in Florida and Nevada, whose only conceivable motive is the perpetrator’s compulsion to make his satanic and nihilistic hatred of other people and of existence itself a compelling item in the...
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  • Lost Near the Beltway
    April 2018

    Lost Near the Beltway

    Whatever happened to the libertarian movement? Since the age of 14 I have been a self-conscious libertarian. That’s when I started reading libertarian tracts (Rand, Mises, Hayek).
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  • The Great Clarifier
    April 2018

    The Great Clarifier

    Not even President Trump’s most ardent admirers would claim that he is a “Great Communicator,” the title bestowed on the last resident of the White House who could plausibly be seen as governing, at least in some respects, as a conservative.
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  • Blame Poland
    April 2018

    Blame Poland

    OK, all you readers: You are weak, easily manipulated, led by the nose to the gutter, susceptible to the devils of your diabolical urges, and you are crazy. In fact you are the unspeakables, the deplorables who voted for Trump, and a bald, ugly...
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  • Tariffs and Delusions
    April 2018

    Tariffs and Delusions

    Lenin may or may not have said that the capitalists would sell him the rope by which he would hang them, but the proverb is assigned to him for good reason. Any revolutionary who dreams of destroying the free-enterprise system can count on a...
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  • America’s Death Wish
    April 2018

    America’s Death Wish

    Parkland, Florida, came and went, bringing a new St. Valentine’s Day massacre, another unspeakable horror, and another opportunity for hashtags and political maneuvering over guns in America.
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  • The Second Risorgimento
    April 2018

    The Second Risorgimento

    The national Italian elections so feared by Brussels, European liberals, and other would-be unifiers across the Continent have come and gone after having given the officials of the European Union “une mauvaise soirée,” as Marine Le Pen expressed it.
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  • Trump’s Understatement
    March 2018

    Trump’s Understatement

    Gee, this is the worst news I’ve had since the defeat at Stalingrad. More than 80 former ambassadors to African nations sent a letter of protest to The Donald. Even worse, Botswana, Ghana, Haiti, Namibia, Senegal, and the African Union have all...
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  • Tucker Carlson’s “Change of Heart”: The Chronicles Interview
    March 2018

    Tucker Carlson’s “Change of Heart”: The Chronicles Interview

    From his perch at FOX News, Tucker Carlson was beating back criticism from liberals and neoconservatives at the same time. The subject was immigration.
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  • Is Trump “Normal”?
    March 2018

    Is Trump “Normal”?

    The debate regarding President Trump’s sanity is echoed at a slightly less hyperbolic level by liberals’ fervent insistence that he is “not a normal president.” What, exactly, does this mean?
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  • An Honest Reckoning
    March 2018

    An Honest Reckoning

    John le Carré could hardly imagine a better scenario: a spy-for-hire—once a servant of Her Majesty’s government, now selling his services in a foreign market—takes payouts from two masters simultaneously, as both a police informant and a...
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  • Will Democrats Learn?
    March 2018

    Will Democrats Learn?

    Year after year, a president gives a State of the Union Address, and year after year the minority party’s response is predictably awful.
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  • Politics Is Policy
    March 2018

    Politics Is Policy

    “Drain the swamp!” Donald Trump declared in every campaign speech of 2016. He meant, of course, the Swamp of Washington, D.C., home of the labyrinthine network of centralized bureaucracies that control our lives. It’s also called the Deep State...
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  • Hawks Win
    March 2018

    Hawks Win

    The Pentagon’s National Defense Strategy, which Defense Secretary James Mattis presented on January 19, envisages aggressive measures to counter Russia and China and instructs the military to refocus on Cold War-style competition with them, away...
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  • The Loss of the Familiar
    March 2018

    The Loss of the Familiar

    From the late 19th or early 20th century down to the present day, liberalism has been progressively oriented to psychology and therapeutic technique.
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  • Beyond Imagination: Uranium One
    February 2018

    Beyond Imagination: Uranium One

    The multilayered story surrounding Uranium One—the former South African, then Canadian, and now Russian company, of which both Bill and Hillary Clinton and their family foundation are the enriched beneficiaries—has all the usual elements of a...
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  • The Long Retreat Through the Institutions
    February 2018

    The Long Retreat Through the Institutions

    Twenty-sixteen was the year when American liberals confidently expected to consolidate the quiet political and cultural revolution they had been conducting for decades in the coming national elections.
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  • Shoes to Fill
    February 2018

    Shoes to Fill

    America is a nation of normal people who find themselves thrust into increasingly abnormal situations. Left-wing ideologues want to take a country of families, churches, and businesses and turn it into a playpen of radical identities.
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  • Trump, Beating the Odds
    February 2018

    Trump, Beating the Odds

    U.S. employment increased over President Trump’s first year in office, expanding from 145,541,000 in January to 147,380,000 in December, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Thus, amid the sound and fury of #NeverTrump media coverage,...
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  • The New Deplorables
    February 2018

    The New Deplorables

    After Roy Moore secured the Republican nomination to fill Jeff Sessions’ seat in the U.S. Senate, the Washington Post ran an article claiming that, roughly four decades ago, Moore had dated two teenage girls and asked out a third in front of her...
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  • Fire in the Minds of Men
    January 2018

    Fire in the Minds of Men

    Recently, we marked the 100th anniversary of the 1917 Russian Revolution, an event sparked by the revolutionary fire in the minds of men that has burned for as long as there have been men on the earth.
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  • Blame Us!
    January 2018

    Blame Us!

    Only the most delusional limey would deny that, when it comes to popular culture, Britain is downstream from America. In politics, too, we follow your lead. Tony Blair pursued Bill Clinton’s middle way; David Cameron adopted George W. Bush’s...
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  • Cultural Notes, in Two Keys
    January 2018

    Cultural Notes, in Two Keys

    The liberal print media, like all things liberal, are never more themselves than when searching out, discovering, and deploring violence in America while remaining blissfully unaware of the verbal violence they commit every minute of the day in...
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  • Trump’s First Year
    January 2018

    Trump’s First Year

    A key source of volatility in today’s international system is the propensity of the U.S. government to reject any conventionally ordered hierarchy of American global interests. Washington’s deterritorialized policy of full-spectrum dominance is...
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  • Obama’s Manufacturing Bust
    January 2018

    Obama’s Manufacturing Bust

    Barack H. Obama left office as the first Democratic president to preside over a net loss of domestic manufacturing jobs since the U.S. government started compiling records in the late 1930’s.
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  • Politicians #NeverLearn
    January 2018

    Politicians #NeverLearn

    Donald Trump’s first year as President is drawing to a close, and it’s been rough. The Republican Congress proved unequal to the task of repealing Obama Care. The border wall hasn’t been built.
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  • The Job of Sex
    January 2018

    The Job of Sex

    The lares and penates of post-Christian (actually postpagan) America are Money, Sex, and Power, not necessarily in that order but rather according to individual taste and proclivity.
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  • Trump, NAFTA, and America First
    January 2018

    Trump, NAFTA, and America First

    President Donald Trump has made the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) a cornerstone of his economic policy. Signed into law by Democrat Bill Clinton in 1993 with Republican support, NAFTA created a managed trade...
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  • Stupid Is Not Enough
    December 2017

    Stupid Is Not Enough

    Annals of the Stupid Party is more than a blistering critique of Republican ineptitude. Wilson is delivering one last two-by-four to the elephant: Donald Trump has taught you how to win again, by confronting such crucial issues as trade and...
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  • Operation Cotton Mather
    December 2017

    Operation Cotton Mather

    The country is currently suffering through a series of moral panics—or, more precisely, the coastal elites are, while the rest of us go about the business of ordinary living.
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  • Whither Europe?
    December 2017

    Whither Europe?

    That Europe is in mortal danger from the ongoing, overwhelmingly Muslim immigrant deluge and from its ruling elites’ spiritual degeneracy is beyond dispute.
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  • The Politics of Peace
    December 2017

    The Politics of Peace

    Step by step America is being primed for war with Iran. President Trump has not actually torn up the “Iran deal,” but he “decertified” it in October, and his administration is under constant pressure from the war lobby.
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  • An Uncertain Trump
    November 2017

    An Uncertain Trump

    During the seemingly endless presidential campaign, Donald Trump was often both courageous and decisive, repeatedly refusing to back down from “gaffes” that were unpopular with the media because they were actually expressions of the populist...
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  • Bleached Chicken, Brexit, and Trump
    November 2017

    Bleached Chicken, Brexit, and Trump

    Will he? Won’t he? Ever since Donald Trump emerged as a serious presidential contender last year, the British have been excited at the thought of his arrival in the motherland.
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  • Checkmating Middle America
    November 2017

    Checkmating Middle America

    America’s descent into banana republicanism continues apace, and on two fronts. To begin with, we learn that President Trump’s much-disdained assertion that Trump Tower was being wiretapped during the election campaign turns out to be absolutely...
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  • The Birth of National-Globalism
    November 2017

    The Birth of National-Globalism

    Following President Trump’s maiden speech to the U.N. General Assembly on September 19, ideologically incompatible analysts have found similar reasons to cheer or condemn the 40-minute oration.
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  • The Trumping of the GOP
    November 2017

    The Trumping of the GOP

    There were two reasons to support Donald J. Trump in the presidential campaign last year. The first was the man himself, whom one could trust to deliver a much needed shock to the utterly narcissistic, self-involved American political system...
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  • Unlovable Losers: The Left in Perspective
    November 2017

    Unlovable Losers: The Left in Perspective

    Americans are smarter, more intuitive, than many conservatives may think. As time goes by, polls show that they have little tolerance, let alone enthusiasm, for the concepts of “microaggressions” or “safe spaces” or harebrained initiatives to...
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  • Rediscovering the Paterfamilias
    November 2017

    Rediscovering the Paterfamilias

    Cicero wrote De Officiis to his son, Marcus, a student of philosophy who had just finished his first year in Athens. Though Cicero does not state it directly, the work is meant to supplement what, to his mind, Greek philosophy lacked most: good...
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  • The Convenient Religion
    November 2017

    The Convenient Religion

    Everyone in America today—right, left, or middle, if there still is one—can agree that the explosive political response to Donald Trump’s presidency is unprecedented in American political history.
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  • The Camelot-Chequers Axis
    November 2017

    The Camelot-Chequers Axis

    At the kernel of this story is the at times ambivalent relationship between JFK and his bluntly outspoken father, whose appointment in 1938 as ambassador to the Court of St. James seemed inexplicable even at the time.
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  • No Good Deed . . .
    October 2017

    No Good Deed . . .

    Sheriff Joe Arpaio, hated by the open-borders crowd but loved by those who want to uphold America’s immigration laws, has always been surrounded by controversies—they whirl around him like dust storms in the Arizona desert.
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  • You May Say You’re a Dreamer
    October 2017

    You May Say You’re a Dreamer

    The unconstitutional Obama executive order known as DACA was rescinded by the Trump DOJ on September 5. Even as the courageous and unassuming A.G. Jeff Sessions made the announcement, thousands of tweets painted him as a hood-donning...
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  • Needed: Hands and Nerves
    October 2017

    Needed: Hands and Nerves

    Decades before Donald Trump vanquished Hillary Clinton, Pat Buchanan heralded the themes that would put Trump in the White House. Yet despite all that lead time, Trump’s victory was still in one sense premature.
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  • Choose Your Side
    October 2017

    Choose Your Side

    The first thought that occurred to me upon receiving a review copy of David Garrow’s hefty biography of our former president was, besides its weight (four pounds), how the jacket photograph perfectly expresses what is revealed in 1,084 pages of...
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  • Who’s the Most Hateful of Them All?
    October 2017

    Who’s the Most Hateful of Them All?

    No studies indicate, let alone demonstrate, that a significant percentage of ordinary white people “hate” black people, or black white, or indeed that an appreciable number belonging to any race in America today “hates” members of any other race.
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  • Outdated
    September 2017

    Outdated

    Albert and David Maysles’s classic documentary Grey Gardens provided a disturbing snapshot of 1970’s American upper-class life, replete with mentally ill dowagers, feral cats, and a crumbling estate.
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  • Taking a Stand in Warsaw
    September 2017

    Taking a Stand in Warsaw

    With a monument to the 1944 Warsaw Uprising as his backdrop, President Trump delivered a forceful speech on the eve of the G20 Summit, sounding themes that would not be welcome by most other leaders of the world’s most economically powerful...
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  • Remembering the Old Russia
    September 2017

    Remembering the Old Russia

    This Fall marks the centennial of the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution. Although few commentators today are likely to glorify that event or its aftermath, most will assume that the revolution was a regrettable necessity, which swept away a repressive...
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  • Rumors of War
    September 2017

    Rumors of War

    By the seventh month of Donald Trump’s presidency a surreal quality to U.S. foreign policy decision-making had become evident. It is at odds with both the theoretical model and historical practice.
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  • A Small Victory for Europe
    September 2017

    A Small Victory for Europe

    As the new French President, Emmanuel Macron seems determined to hitch opposites together, combine like with dislike, compatibles with incompatibles, and otherwise fudge his policies as he did during the electoral campaign.
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  • The Abnormal Nation
    September 2017

    The Abnormal Nation

    Since the reunification of East and West Germany in 1990, Germans have debated the question of whether their country can ever be a “normal” one again.
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  • Get Out
    September 2017

    Get Out

    No matter what follows in Afghanistan after America’s departure, it is immoral to gamble with the lives of our troops for one more minute to provide for the common defense of the Pashtuns.
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  • The Tragedy of Richard Nixon
    September 2017

    The Tragedy of Richard Nixon

    Pat Buchanan’s new biography of Richard Nixon’s presidency is the first volume anyone looking at that tumultuous time should turn to. Having served as Nixon’s researcher and speechwriter starting in 1966, Buchanan, not yet 30, followed the...
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  • Opposite Directions
    September 2017

    Opposite Directions

    History not only repeats itself but inverts itself. When these things happen simultaneously, the result is precisely what is happening today, as conservatives return to their “isolationist” roots and progressives return to their warmongering ways.
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  • The Meaning of Macron—and the “Right” in the West
    September 2017

    The Meaning of Macron—and the “Right” in the West

    “He is on the right.” “That party represents the right.” These are standard expressions that are familiar today in the West, including France. But as usual, few understand or even care about the precise meaning of the word.
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  • What I Saw (and Prayed) in New Orleans
    September 2017

    What I Saw (and Prayed) in New Orleans

    At Mayor Landrieu's behest and with the nod of the city council, four commemorative monuments, each over 100 years old, were removed by masked men. Three of their targets were world-class sculptures.
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  • The Tragedy of Richard Nixon
    September 2017

    The Tragedy of Richard Nixon

    Pat Buchanan’s new biography of Richard Nixon’s presidency is the first volume anyone looking at that tumultuous time should turn to. Having served as Nixon’s researcher and speechwriter starting in 1966, Buchanan, not yet 30, followed the...
    Read more
  • Managerial Suicide
    August 2017

    Managerial Suicide

    It is increasingly clear that the public and political class of Western countries is simply inadequate to the job of fighting terrorism.
    Read more
  • Corporate Responsibility: An Indecent Proposal
    August 2017

    Corporate Responsibility: An Indecent Proposal

    This past semester a group of bored yet curious students at my university invited faculty to participate in a lunch-hour debate. When the organizers first contacted me they referenced several of my former students who praised my heretical...
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  • Travel Ban, and Beyond
    August 2017

    Travel Ban, and Beyond

    The Supreme Court decided on June 26 to allow key parts of the Trump administration’s “travel ban” to go into effect temporarily. This was an unexpected victory for the President—and for common sense.
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  • If It Leads, It Bleeds
    August 2017

    If It Leads, It Bleeds

    The bonds that bind us together as a nation are fraying, and this is by design. Divide and rule is the byword of the “Resistance,” but they are banking on a victory that isn’t necessarily in the cards.
    Read more
  • Snuffed Candle
    August 2017

    Snuffed Candle

    Proclaimed political “dynasties” in American history have never persisted beyond two generations. The Adams family produced two presidents in two generations, followed by an author of significant accomplishments who disdained democracy and never...
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  • Losers Double Down
    August 2017

    Losers Double Down

    The party of Hillary Clinton has not stopped losing since last November. This fact is easily overlooked amid all of President Trump’s bad press, but Democrats have reliably come up short in special elections from Montana to Kansas to suburban...
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  • The Meaning of Donald Trump
    August 2017

    The Meaning of Donald Trump

    When one considers the extent and weight of the now-globalized opposition arrayed against him, the fact that Donald Trump should have any solid accomplishments at all to his credit is astonishing, as Susan Rice admits.
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  • Man Up
    August 2017

    Man Up

    Mike Madigan (so the rumor goes) will never leave the Illinois House of Representatives, or even risk vacating the speaker’s chair, because doing so would almost certainly set him on the path trodden by four of the last eight governors of Illinois.
    Read more
  • The Inevitability of National Politics
    August 2017

    The Inevitability of National Politics

    Many conservatives have become disenchanted with national politics. This disenchantment is understandable. Strong support for Republicans seeking the White House and seats in Congress has done little to conserve the type of society most of...
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  • Managerial Suicide
    August 2017

    Managerial Suicide

    It is increasingly clear that the public and political class of Western countries is simply inadequate to the job of fighting terrorism.
    Read more
  • Success in “Defeat”
    August 2017

    Success in “Defeat”

    What do you do when people favor your ideas but your party is shut out of government? That’s the dilemma faced by the far right in the Netherlands. The Party for Freedom, led by Geert Wilders, settled for second place in the national election...
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  • States’ Rights and the Left’s Agenda
    August 2017

    States’ Rights and the Left’s Agenda

    These days, it’s the left that’s pushing states’ rights. And for that we can thank President Trump. As is often the case with America, California is leading the way.
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  • The British War for Independence
    August 2017

    The British War for Independence

    The anti-Brexit hysteria never went away. “How Brexit damaged Britain’s democracy” was the headline of the regular political columnist “Bagehot” in The Economist (March 30).
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  • Brazen
    August 2017

    Brazen

    Are the Russians guilty of trying to undermine American democracy? The answer may surprise you. But first the “news.”
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  • How He Did It
    July 2017

    How He Did It

    Roger Stone is a longtime political operative who has worked for every Republican president since Richard Nixon, and numerous presidential and other candidates as well.
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  • Desperate NeverTrumpers and the Constitution
    July 2017

    Desperate NeverTrumpers and the Constitution

    A year ago the op-ed writers who present themselves as tutors to the nation insisted that Donald Trump could not and would not become president. Progressive pundits were certain of this—after all, they didn’t know anyone who was voting for him.
    Read more
  • Wahhabism First
    July 2017

    Wahhabism First

    President Donald Trump started his first foreign tour on May 20 in Saudi Arabia. His two-day visit was punctuated by a series of embarrassingly poltroonish statements and gestures to his hosts.
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  • Theresa May’s Anglo-Saxon Appeal
    July 2017

    Theresa May’s Anglo-Saxon Appeal

    The British have a penchant for women leaders: Queens Elizabeth I & II, Victoria, Margaret Thatcher, and now Theresa May. The current Prime Minister isn’t just well liked: People seem to love her.
    Read more
  • The Discarded Image
    July 2017

    The Discarded Image

    Mitch Landrieu and his growing coalition of disgruntled minorities and public-school-educated leftists give us an idea of where a divided, majority-ruled America is heading.
    Read more
  • Demolition Day
    July 2017

    Demolition Day

    The 150th Anniversary (or Sesquicentennial) of Canadian Confederation will be celebrated on July 1. That holiday was traditionally denominated “Dominion Day,” as Canada was officially called “the Dominion of Canada”—a term which has now fallen...
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  • Scandalous Education: UT’s War on Standards
    June 2017

    Scandalous Education: UT’s War on Standards

    In 2003, the Supreme Court expected “that 25 years from now, the use of racial preferences will no longer be necessary” in university admissions. That was the conventional wisdom of the time.
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  • A Faith Misplaced
    June 2017

    A Faith Misplaced

    Progressive arrogance. Technocratic overreach. Social engineering. Racial tension. Expanding executive powers. Aggressive and endless waves of “experts.” Economic disparity and unrest. “Us” versus “them.”
    Read more
  • The Constitution Knows
    June 2017

    The Constitution Knows

    The right to abortion that shielded Gosnell and his customers from the law for decades comes, we are told, from the U.S. Constitution—somewhere, perhaps, between the 9th and 14th Amendments.
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  • Blaspheming Liberals
    June 2017

    Blaspheming Liberals

    “Free speech!” has been the rallying cry of Republicans and conservatives for months on end. This really ought to stop.
    Read more
  • The Great Transparency Racket
    June 2017

    The Great Transparency Racket

    “Democracy Dies in Darkness” is the motto of the Washington Post. The editors of the Post belong to the honorable group of which Norman Podhoretz once confessed himself a member—Idolaters of Democracy.
    Read more
  • Race and Civil Rights
    June 2017

    Race and Civil Rights

    One would expect race-baiting liberals and leftists to try to glorify the “civil-rights movement” and the laws of the early 1960’s, insisting that we view all of it as earth shaking history, more important than the fall of the Roman Empire, the...
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  • Smear <em>Factor</em>
    June 2017

    Smear Factor

    The mainstream media is the enemy of the people, and the vituperative campaign against the 45th president is proof that it is.
    Read more
  • The Face of Liberalism
    June 2017

    The Face of Liberalism

    It was said (by Bernard DeVoto?) of America before World War II that it was as if the United States had been tipped to the left and downward, so that, across the rest of the country, whatever was unattached or unsecured slid southwest into...
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  • Brinkmen Kim and Trump
    June 2017

    Brinkmen Kim and Trump

    Contrary to what John McCain and others in Washington are saying, North Korea’s nuclear program is not a “Cuban missile crisis in slow motion.” Nor does tough talk from President Trump mean he’s about to launch preemptive strikes against Kim...
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  • On Deaf Ears
    May 2017

    On Deaf Ears

    President Trump has said that he does not intend to seek to impose our values globally and that it is not our job to engage in “nation building” by attempting to transform entire societies. That is a good start, and a promising sign for the...
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  • The Fun of Brexit
    May 2017

    The Fun of Brexit

    Arron Banks looks out proudly and pugnaciously from the cover of Bad Boys of Brexit like a character in a Hogarth engraving, flanking the equally Hogarthian Nigel Farage in a photo taken as Farage faced the globe’s agog media on the auspicious...
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  • If the Center Cannot Hold
    May 2017

    If the Center Cannot Hold

    While most American conservatives still see those to their left as merely misguided, many on the American left now view those to their right as evil.
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  • Big Macs, A-bombs, and Trump
    May 2017

    Big Macs, A-bombs, and Trump

    William F. Buckley, Jr., spent his adult winter months in Rougemont, an alpine resort next to its chicer neighbor Gstaad, now the Mecca for the nouveau riche and vulgar.
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  • War on Louisville—or War on Kentucky?
    May 2017

    War on Louisville—or War on Kentucky?

    In one corner, there is Kentucky’s upbeat governor, whose attractive wife, five biological children, and four adopted children compose a family too large to fit into the traditional governor’s mansion.
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  • Where Honor Is Due
    May 2017

    Where Honor Is Due

    I got a call from a Washington-based journalist the other day who wanted to know if Pat Buchanan had any influence on the platform of our current President. What a question!
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  • Power to the People!
    May 2017

    Power to the People!

    If we desire any kind of freedom in our life on this earth—moral, cultural, economic, political—we have to fight to prevent the centralization of power. Struggle is our lot in life; that die was cast long ago, by Adam and Eve in the Garden. The...
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  • The Electoral College: Rooted in Racism?

    The Electoral College: Rooted in Racism?

    The Framers and Ratifiers of the Constitution understood that the Constitution’s provision for elections in which no candidate received a majority of Electoral College votes would sometimes, even usually, come into play.
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  • Did Populism “Lose”?
    May 2017

    Did Populism “Lose”?

    The media’s fixation on Geert Wilders obscures what ought to be the most striking result from the Dutch general election: The Liberal-Labour coalition government, which pursued tough fiscal policies and produced economic growth, was destroyed.
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  • K Is for Vendetta
    April 2017

    K Is for Vendetta

    And it came to pass that fear did grip all of the Swamp, from Foggy Bottom to DuPont Circle; and it did spread unto all of the region beyond the Potomac. For behold, Steve Bannon had come.
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  • Reading Huxley Between the Headlines
    April 2017

    Reading Huxley Between the Headlines

    “Is it time to reread Brave New World?” asks the distinguished historian Anthony Beevor, in a recent article on Donald Trump’s victory in the 2016 presidential election. I think it is.
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  • What Do Liberals Want?
    April 2017

    What Do Liberals Want?

    What would be the fate of non- or anti-liberals today had Hillary Clinton, John Podesta, and The Democracy won last year’s election? The anti-Trump movement does bring certain highly unpleasant possibilities to mind.
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  • The New Class War
    April 2017

    The New Class War

    The burden of this important book by the editor of First Things is the need to restore genuine freedom to American society—and, by implication, Western society as a whole.
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  • Considering Bannon
    April 2017

    Considering Bannon

    They liken him to Rasputin and Svengali: He’s the éminence grise of the Trump administration, the hard-line ideologue who represents and multiplies all the darkest impulses of that man in the Oval Office.
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  • A Coup Most Foul
    April 2017

    A Coup Most Foul

    We have seen coups of sorts in Washington before, not that anyone one calls them that. (Remember JFK, Nixon.) The one against Trump is of a different order of magnitude. It had been plotted by the Deep State even before he was inaugurated.
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  • The New Liberal Establishment
    April 2017

    The New Liberal Establishment

    For many decades people—conservatives, especially—have understood the phrase the liberal establishment to mean the social, educational, and economic elite that sits atop the broader community of people who think, act, and vote liberal: the...
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  • Celebrity Politics
    April 2017

    Celebrity Politics

    Throughout the Republican primaries and the 2016 general election, commentators regularly characterized Donald Trump’s campaign as the political equivalent of a reality show.
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  • Race Against Reason
    March 2017

    Race Against Reason

    We are living in a racially charged climate. Problems associated with the relations between the races seem endemic to all areas of our sad and beleaguered culture. Discussions of law enforcement are dominated by the alleged racism of police...
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  • Who’s a Populist?
    March 2017

    Who’s a Populist?

    As damaging as the practical political loss sustained across the board by the Democratic Party last November was, the symbolic affront by the Republican candidate to what liberals call their “values,” to their idols and orthodoxies, and to...
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  • Public Opinion at the End of an Age
    March 2017

    Public Opinion at the End of an Age

    One symptom of decline and confusion at the end of an age is the prevalent misuse of terms, of designations that have been losing their meanings and are thus no longer real. One such term is public opinion.
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  • Don’t Just Wound It: Kill It
    March 2017

    Don’t Just Wound It: Kill It

    The Department of Education must be destroyed. This holdover from the Carter administration costs us $80 billion per year, for which we have received in return a centralized educational bureaucracy beholden to wildly leftist teachers’ unions and...
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  • Abortion Politics in the Age of Trump
    March 2017

    Abortion Politics in the Age of Trump

    The [pro-life] movement is finally organized and prepared to seize any opportunity to save unborn children. A prime chance offers itself with Donald Trump’s presidency, and pro-life activists and voters effectively contributed to his election.
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  • The Idolatrous Empire
    March 2017

    The Idolatrous Empire

    Historians of our day have long debated whether ideas or interests are the prime drivers of human decisions. The Hegelian school, which includes neoconservatives and neoliberals, believes the answer is ideas—freedom, democracy, and equality.
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  • Inaugurating a Movement
    March 2017

    Inaugurating a Movement

    Donald J. Trump never minces words, and on January 20 he showed that he isn’t about to start, now that he’s President of these United States.
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  • Friends, Busts, and Leverage
    March 2017

    Friends, Busts, and Leverage

    When historians someday study Anglo-American relations in the early 21st century, they will find a useful allegory in the saga of the Winston Churchill bust. This is the tale of a smallish sculpture by Jacob Epstein that has come to be a...
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  • Virtue-Signalers in a Snit
    March 2017

    Virtue-Signalers in a Snit

    Hollywood is in a snit. Hollywood is very angry. Hollywood is having a nervous breakdown. The Donald is in the White House, and Hollywood types cannot take it any more. Ditto for the New York Times and the TV networks, except for FOX.
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  • Trump and the GOP
    March 2017

    Trump and the GOP

    Donald Trump exploded upon the political scene as a strongly charged individual, not as the head of a faction of the Republican Party or of a movement of his own. The great question, from the moment he announced his candidacy for the presidency,...
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  • Abortion in the Age of Trump
    March 2017

    Abortion in the Age of Trump

    The pro-life movement has made great strides in recent years, though many people who consider themselves active pro-lifers may not realize it. That’s because the good news has all happened at the state and local levels.
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  • Refugees in Trump’s “Theocracy”
    March 2017

    Refugees in Trump’s “Theocracy”

    President Trump’s executive order restricting travel and refugees from seven Islamic countries evoked utter hysteria from the mainstream media, Democrats, some Republicans, and even some church leaders.
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  • The Return of the Savage
    February 2017

    The Return of the Savage

    The Democrats and the rest of the left are taking the results of last November’s election no better than they predicted the Republicans and the right would do if their man lost.
    Read more
  • Booby-Trapping Trump
    February 2017

    Booby-Trapping Trump

    As I write, the attempted CIA coup against the Trump administration is ongoing. Yes, you read that right: We’re getting awfully close to Seven Days in May territory.
    Read more
  • Depoliticizing Intelligence
    February 2017

    Depoliticizing Intelligence

    Knowing what is going on in the Hobbesian world of international politics is an essential function of the state apparatus.
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  • Beyond the Idiot Box
    February 2017

    Beyond the Idiot Box

    Call me old fashioned, and I will thank you for the compliment. Call me a fool for rosy nostalgia, and more thanks will be in order.
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  • A Victim Must Be Found
    February 2017

    A Victim Must Be Found

    Despite the fact that, in the 19th century, every white man save Abe Lincoln was a racist, W.S. Gilbert was not actually commenting on Japanese culture, and he understood his inventive nomenclature to be exaggerated for comedic effect.
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  • Politics and Sports
    February 2017

    Politics and Sports

    When people compare politics to sports, they do not mean the comparison to be flattering. Voters, we are told, treat politics as irrationally as sports fans do football, baseball, basketball, and hockey.
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  • Back in the Cowboy State
    February 2017

    Back in the Cowboy State

    On November 8 last year, Donald Trump prevented a resurrection of the Clinton administration 16 years after it left office. That same day, in an election paid scant attention by the national media, the spirit of George W. Bush’s administration...
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  • Green Balance of Power
    February 2017

    Green Balance of Power

    A subplot of the 2016 presidential campaign was the Green Party’s ability, for the second time in the 21st century, to achieve balance of power in a close race won by a Republican.
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  • Rise of the Alt-Left: After This, the Deluge
    January 2017

    Rise of the Alt-Left: After This, the Deluge

    It is easy to revel in the misery of forlorn liberals, but it is also easy to get caught up in their binary political game. Already in attack mode, they would prefer that conservatives pay all of their attention to them.
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  • Steadfast Sessions
    January 2017

    Steadfast Sessions

    President and five-star Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower said that a man must “believe in his luck” in order to lead. Jeff Sessions is such a man. He has not only survived multiple setbacks, considered career ending by many, but has consistently come...
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  • Fighting the Dragon With Solzhenitsyn
    January 2017

    Fighting the Dragon With Solzhenitsyn

    Do great men make history? Or does history make great men? One thing’s for sure: History sometimes smothers great men, as Thomas Gray suggests in his famous elegy written in a country churchyard, and as the rows of endless graves from Arlington...
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  • Around the World With Donald Trump
    January 2017

    Around the World With Donald Trump

    The American globalist elite has done, and will continue to do, its damnedest to present Donald Trump to the Americans, and to the world, as a political anomaly, a peculiarly American freak like Huey Long or Father Coughlin, albeit a...
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  • Team Donkey in  Rebuild Mode
    January 2017

    Team Donkey in Rebuild Mode

    In the immediate aftermath of their drubbing on November 8, and following Hillary Clinton’s career-ending injury, the Democrats faced the question every rebuilding team faces: Who is the quarterback of the future?
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  • The Easiness of Being Liberal
    December 2016

    The Easiness of Being Liberal

    Liberals are keen to sniff out and condemn “privilege,” by which they mean the superior education, the affluence, the influence, and the comfort enjoyed by well-connected, well-born people, usually imagined by them to be political conservatives.
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  • “Dangerous Games”: Russia-U.S. Tensions Escalate
    December 2016

    “Dangerous Games”: Russia-U.S. Tensions Escalate

    In October, Yevgeny Kiselyov, Moscow’s TV propaganda hitman in chief, attacked U.S. policy over Syria, warning his audience that American “impudence” could take on what he called “nuclear dimensions.”
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  • Taking Back the Culture
    December 2016

    Taking Back the Culture

    By the time you read this, “the most important election of our lifetime” will be headed for the history books. If the last six most important elections of our lifetime are any indication, however, we will once again have a chance to vote in the...
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  • Signs of Hope in the East
    December 2016

    Signs of Hope in the East

    In the United States, the forces of the cultural left have been particularly aggressive in seeking to diminish the influence of our Christian heritage on American society.
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  • In the Beginning . . .
    December 2016

    In the Beginning . . .

    This latest is vintage Tom Wolfe. As in Radical Chic and The Painted Word, he casts his uniquely probing eye on fashionable orthodoxy and its establishment priests—in this case the strange religious cult of evolution.
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  • Global Challenges in 2017
    December 2016

    Global Challenges in 2017

    In terms of any traditionally understood calculus of national security, the United States is the most invulnerable country in the world. America is armed to the teeth, sheltered on two sides by oceans, and supremely capable of projecting her...
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  • A Confederacy of Dunces
    December 2016

    A Confederacy of Dunces

    In the final weeks of the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign, as our modern-day Madame Defarge’s poll numbers declined slowly but steadily in rhythm to the drip-drip-drip of purloined emails by WikiLeaks, the Clinton campaign settled on a strategy...
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  • A Sense of Place
    December 2016

    A Sense of Place

    I was born and reared in a small Michigan town known as the home of both Gen. George Armstrong Custer and the La-Z-Boy chair company, an accident of local history most people in town do not find strange.
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  • Any Way You Put It
    December 2016

    Any Way You Put It

    We are a nation divided into two irreconcilable camps: the elites and their captive constituencies versus the rest of us. Two nations, really, with mutually exclusive mores, two cultures sitting side by side but increasingly unable to coexist.
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  • It Just Did Happen Here
    December 2016

    It Just Did Happen Here

    Whichever candidate wins the presidency on November 8 (this issue went to press on November 2), the American political establishment will have decisively lost the presidential elections.
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  • The German Resistance
    December 2016

    The German Resistance

    Certain actions should never be taboo in a modern Western democracy. These include public criticism and protest of government policies, as well as presenting alternatives to those policies.
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  • Wreckers and Builders
    November 2016

    Wreckers and Builders

    Twenty-five years is a long time to get back to where you started, but two-and-a-half decades after the collapse of the Soviet Union, it is the United States, not the Russian Federation, that has succeeded in restoring the threat of nuclear...
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  • Our Corner of the Vineyard
    November 2016

    Our Corner of the Vineyard

    It would be a mistake to think that the challenge we face today is merely one of personalities, the result of voters in the primaries picking two intensely dislikable candidates for the highest office in the land.
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  • Mr. Trump and His Gorilla
    November 2016

    Mr. Trump and His Gorilla

    This book burns with a pure and righteous rage. It’s hilariously funny. Its arguments are devastating to the p.c. pieties of our therapeutic elite.
    Read more
  • Democracy in Action
    November 2016

    Democracy in Action

    As both Drutman and Katz emphasize, before the 1970’s lobbying in America was a paltry enterprise.
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  • Unignorable Flashpoints
    November 2016

    Unignorable Flashpoints

    As the nation prepares to go to the polls to elect the 45th president of these United States, two flashpoints may determine the outcome.
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  • Yes, You’re Next
    November 2016

    Yes, You’re Next

    A bunch of charlatans and clowns met in Athens, Greece, at the end of September and, to use an old Greek expression, managed to make a hole in the water.
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  • Obama and the Cool Kids
    October 2016

    Obama and the Cool Kids

    The world will little remember what Barack Obama said during his disappointing presidency, despite his messianic promise and his reputation as rhetor par excellence. His words were not memorable to begin with.
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  • Sounding the Trump
    October 2016

    Sounding the Trump

    In important ways, a revolutionary process has begun. So argues Ilana Mercer in the best extended analysis yet published of the Trump phenomenon: “Trump is getting an atrophied political system to oscillate” in “an oddly marvelous uprising.”
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  • Rise of the Trumps
    October 2016

    Rise of the Trumps

    Come November, Donald Trump may go down in flames. Or he might continue to surprise and astonish us. But the Trump children, regardless of whether their father is ever again allowed in GOP polite company, are another matter.
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  • The True Source
    October 2016

    The True Source

    Phyllis Schlafly, in the spring of 1973, squared off in debate at Illinois State University against archfeminist Betty Friedan. The subject was the Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution, at the time just a few states short of ratification.
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  • Donald Trump and Conservatism
    September 2016

    Donald Trump and Conservatism

    Donald Trump has shattered the false consensus of the Republican Party, the hitherto unrecognized tautology that GOP is conservative because conservative is GOP, and vice versa. In the process, we’ve been confronted by an embarrassing reality:...
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  • Turkey Purge
    September 2016

    Turkey Purge

    Democracy isn’t freedom—and in today’s Turkey some people realize that, as amazing as that may seem. Not ordinary folks, but the mid-level officers of the Turkish army, who have been watching with a jaundiced eye the steady Islamization of their...
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  • Merely a Pretext
    September 2016

    Merely a Pretext

    Liberals say they believe in democracy, meaning government that represents and listens to the people whose instrument it is supposed to be. Yet democratic governments today clearly do not listen to the people, if “listening” means trying to...
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  • Earning Your Protest
    August 2016

    Earning Your Protest

    Like many young men graduating high school in 1966, my father took a fast track to the politically seething, war-shattered jungles of a small country on the other side of the world.
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  • We’re All Extremists Now
    August 2016

    We’re All Extremists Now

    The timing of Omar Mateen’s shooting at Orlando’s Pulse nightclub was rotten for the Obama administration, because Secretary of State John Kerry had just published his carefully worded Joint Strategy on Countering Violent Extremism (CVE), in...
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  • Beyond Populism
    August 2016

    Beyond Populism

    Donald Trump’s political success dramatizes the nature of today’s politics. On one side we have denationalized ruling elites with absolute faith in their own outlook and very little concern for Americans as Americans.
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  • England’s Independence Day
    August 2016

    England’s Independence Day

    The Brexit referendum of June 23 was a momentous event, comparable in long-term implications to the fall of the Berlin Wall a generation ago. It laid bare the yawning gap between the London-based political machine and the alienated and angry...
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  • A Reluctant Revolutionary
    August 2016

    A Reluctant Revolutionary

    Wendell Berry is a Democrat, pacifist, and critic of organized religion. Add to this the fact that he is a writer whose work has proved compelling to many conservatives, and he becomes a bit mysterious.
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  • Tocqueville, Santayana, and Donald Trump
    August 2016

    Tocqueville, Santayana, and Donald Trump

    For Americans and non-Americans alike, the American people has seemed a recognizable and describable breed from the earliest years of the Republic down to the 21st century, despite America’s reputation as a nation hospitable to immigration and...
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  • Abridging Omar
    August 2016

    Abridging Omar

    We are fast approaching a time when a terrorist incident every couple of months will be the new normal. Is this the kind of country we want to live in?
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  • Now There Will Always Be an England
    August 2016

    Now There Will Always Be an England

    The tenor—and temper—of the debate leading up to the British referendum on the United Kingdom’s continued membership in the European Union on June 23 hardly suggested the rhetorical and emotional violence of the response by the proponents of...
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  • Supremely Uninterested
    August 2016

    Supremely Uninterested

    In every presidential election since 1992, complaints about subpar Republican candidates have been met with a common refrain: This is the most important election in our lifetime, because of the Supreme Court!
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  • The Racists and the Flag
    August 2016

    The Racists and the Flag

    The Southern Baptist Convention finally had its Appomattox, surrendering the flag of its ancestors at its annual meeting of messengers (representative delegates) held in mid-June in St. Louis.
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  • Abortion’s Triple Crown
    August 2016

    Abortion’s Triple Crown

    For four decades now, pro-life voters have been wedded to the national Republican Party by the vows of politicians whose actions, upon election, have proved that they had no intention ever of fulfilling them.
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  • Trump and the Stakes of Power
    July 2016

    Trump and the Stakes of Power

    Political science shares with sociology a bias toward presentism, describing political structures as they currently exist with no sense that they will ever change (at least not in the short run) or, for that matter, have ever changed.
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  • Diary of a Driftless Conservative
    July 2016

    Diary of a Driftless Conservative

    “Hillsboro’s a conservative community,” said Robert, and for three days and three nights I attempted to figure out what he meant.
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  • Not Your Mother’s Weasels
    July 2016

    Not Your Mother’s Weasels

    At the United Nations in the fall of 2009, Barack Obama acknowledged, with customary self-regard, “the expectations that accompany my presidency around the world,” no doubt referring to his pledge about the receding oceans, healing the planet and...
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  • With the GOP—Or Without It
    July 2016

    With the GOP—Or Without It

    Donald J. Trump is the political issue of our time. Yet Mr. Trump is, in a very real sense, peripheral to present events. He is a result, not the effective cause; a symptom, not the disease.
    Read more
  • The Efficient Destruction of Flyover Country
    July 2016

    The Efficient Destruction of Flyover Country

    Ideologues tend to place a great value on economic laws. I started out my undergraduate career hoping for a double major in political science and economics. My goal was to administer a breadline and to understand why it was necessary.
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  • That Bloody Woman
    July 2016

    That Bloody Woman

    Margaret Thatcher, one of the most successful British prime ministers of modern times, was known to her enemies and detractors as “That Bloody Woman”.
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  • Strategic Crossroads
    July 2016

    Strategic Crossroads

    The aftermath of the Cold War has seen the emergence of what Robert Kagan and William Kristol have called “benevolent global hegemony.” The leaders of both major U.S. political parties have asserted that America’s unchallengeable military might...
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  • Immigration and Ideology
    July 2016

    Immigration and Ideology

    It was the first meeting of The John Randolph Club, held somewhere in the wilds of Texas. I was there at the urging of Murray Rothbard, who was enthusiastic about this gathering of libertarians and paleoconservatives in the wake of the Cold...
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  • The Devil You Know
    July 2016

    The Devil You Know

    Abortion is no longer a “necessary evil” or an “unavoidable tragedy” or any of the other phrases designed both to acknowledge and to hide the reality of the act; today, as another Clinton vies for the highest office in the land, abortion is...
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  • Qin, Hadrian, Trump
    July 2016

    Qin, Hadrian, Trump

    A frequent English correspondent from Stratford-upon-Avon who contributes regularly to this magazine wrote recently to express the frustration mockers of Donald Trump’s Big Beautiful Wall have been causing him.
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  • The Right Reborn
    June 2016

    The Right Reborn

    The stunning success of the Trump campaign has upended what has passed for conservatism lo these many years and opened up new vistas for the American Right.
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  • Trump and His Enemies
    June 2016

    Trump and His Enemies

    To the extent that a man may be judged by his enemies, Donald Trump is a very good man, indeed. And the more extended and successful his campaign becomes, the more it proves that everything he has ever said about the conjoined political and...
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  • Just Don’t Tell the Truth
    June 2016

    Just Don’t Tell the Truth

    U.S. Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-CA) is against requiring women to register for Selective Service in our Brave New Military. Accordingly, he proposed an amendment to the 2017 defense-spending bill that accomplishes the opposite of what he believes.
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  • Let America Be America
    May 2016

    Let America Be America

    Donald Trump claims he will make America great again. Hillary Clinton responds that America has never quit being great. Bernie Sanders seems to have his doubts that America has ever been great, but he would be happy to try to make her so if...
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  • Easy Sell
    May 2016

    Easy Sell

    Twice a finalist for the Pulitzer, H.W. Brands, in "Reagan: The Life", describes the 40th president as a conservative Franklin Roosevelt. What Roosevelt was to the “first half of the twentieth century, Reagan was to the second half.”
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  • The Crucial Years
    May 2016

    The Crucial Years

    The evidence of the end of the Cold War around 1990 was clearer than evidence of its beginning had been around, say, 1947. By “Cold War” we mean the conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union—not that between the United States and...
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  • Donald Trump, the Court, and the Law

    Donald Trump, the Court, and the Law

    Is Donald Trump a Burkean? Would Russell Kirk vote for him for president? Can a paleoconservative legal scholar imagine any benefit to a Trump presidency?
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  • Falling In (and Out of) Line
    May 2016

    Falling In (and Out of) Line

    As I write, we have reached the stage of the Republican primary cycle that, since at least 1988, requires a pronouncement from the highest levels of the GOP: Now is the time for other candidates to back out and for all Republicans to support the...
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  • Prioritizing Threats
    May 2016

    Prioritizing Threats

    As Donald Trump moves closer to the magic number of 1,237 delegates, the panic of the political class is a wonderful sight to behold.
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  • Terrorizing the Old Bag
    May 2016

    Terrorizing the Old Bag

    Once upon a time, the New York Times called herself the Old Gray Lady; now, truth be told, she’s much closer to a Bitter Old Bag. Long-winded, overexplained, tendentious, and biased against anything normal, the Times is more to be pitied than...
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  • How the World Works
    May 2016

    How the World Works

    The Panama Papers appeared in April, promising to be the biggest bombshell dropped on the international community since Nagasaki.
    Read more
  • Parties
    April 2016

    Parties

    Contrary to popular belief, political parties are not democratic institutions. They are extraconstitutional instruments of elite control, machines for corralling and pacifying the voters with platitudes.
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  • A Paleo Moment
    April 2016

    A Paleo Moment

    While it looks like the much-touted Libertarian Moment has passed—if it was ever here to begin with—we can say with some degree of certainty that the Paleoconservative Moment has arrived.
    Read more
  • Antonin Scalia’s Flexible Constitution
    April 2016

    Antonin Scalia’s Flexible Constitution

    Who is to decide? This question animated Associate Justice Antonin Scalia, who died of natural causes in mid-February. He was the longest-serving member of the current Supreme Court.
    Read more
  • End of the Liberal Dream
    April 2016

    End of the Liberal Dream

    Hell hath no fury like a peaceable liberal whose peaceable cause seems to be losing—especially when that cause is represented by the liberal himself, as Hillary Clinton’s tirade in the guise of a concession speech in Manchester, New Hampshire,...
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  • A Necessary Realignment
    April 2016

    A Necessary Realignment

    As I write on the morning of Super Tuesday, March 1, the Republican establishment is in hysterics. The writing is on the wall. By the end of the day, Donald Trump will have all but sewed up the 2016 Republican nomination for president.
    Read more
  • Trumpsteria: Dislike!
    April 2016

    Trumpsteria: Dislike!

    Chaos dominates the political scene today thanks to the success of the Trump campaign and the Trumpsteria that has accompanied it. This chaos is the subject of myriad essays, commentaries, and—most significantly—power grabs both brand new and...
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  • Time for a Conservative Reformation
    March 2016

    Time for a Conservative Reformation

    The fate of conservatism is thought to be hanging in the balance these days, and with it, perhaps, the fate of the country, of a political party, of presidential candidates, of a movement.
    Read more
  • Capitalism: The Conservative Illusion
    March 2016

    Capitalism: The Conservative Illusion

    When the Cold War ended in 1991, American conservatives rejoiced over the triumph of democratic capitalism, which had struggled for over half a century, first against the rise of fascism, and then against the Soviet bloc and the specter of global...
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  • Uncle Bud Helps Out Jeb Bush
    March 2016

    Uncle Bud Helps Out Jeb Bush

    I know we have not always seen I to I, as they say, but fair is fair, as they say, and I feel it is my duty to let you know that one of your opponents has been making fun of you and misreporting where you stand.
    Read more
  • The Ugly Beautiful Losers
    March 2016

    The Ugly Beautiful Losers

    “Beautiful losers” was the phrase Sam Francis borrowed from Leonard Cohen to sum up the failure of the American conservative movement. Beautiful or not, American conservatives have been losers from their movement’s inception.
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  • The Ranchers and the Mandatory Minimum
    March 2016

    The Ranchers and the Mandatory Minimum

    Two Oregon ranchers, Steven Dwight Hammond and Dwight Lincoln Hammond, Jr., have been at the center of ethical and cultural clashes for several years.
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  • Conservative Origins
    March 2016

    Conservative Origins

    The year was 1964. I was 13 years old. Sitting in the family room of my parents’ home in Yorktown Heights, New York, with the TV on, I picked up the envelope that had arrived in the mail that day.
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  • NR Trumped
    March 2016

    NR Trumped

    National Review’s February 15 number, “Against Trump,” carries a leading editorial condemning the Republican presidential candidate as a man who “would trash the broad conservative ideological consensus within the GOP in favor of a free-floating...
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  • Trump Vindication
    March 2016

    Trump Vindication

    From the beginning of Donald Trump’s candidacy for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination, I have consistently said that I do not expect him to win the nomination, or, if he does capture it, to win the election.
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  • Iowa’s Odds
    March 2016

    Iowa’s Odds

    Six coin tosses. Six separate wins. And thus was Hillary Clinton crowned the Democratic winner of the Iowa Caucuses.
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  • Excluding Muslims: Facts and Fictions
    February 2016

    Excluding Muslims: Facts and Fictions

    Donald Trump’s call for a moratorium on Muslim immigration has drawn fire from the establishment right. “It’s a violation of our Constitution, but it also undermines the character of our nation,” Republican presidential candidate Carly Fiorina...
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  • White Like Me
    February 2016

    White Like Me

    The aims of white separatists are geographical and political impossibilities, while the dreams of white supremacists are doomed by the demographics of the rapidly self-shrinking white world and by the facts of modern political life and the...
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  • SCOTUS: What to Watch in 2016
    February 2016

    SCOTUS: What to Watch in 2016

    Hope, as they say, springs eternal. Lately, those of us who believe in the rule of law and an objective interpretation of the Constitution according to the original understanding of those who framed it have been dealt some cruel blows.
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  • Who Defines America?
    February 2016

    Who Defines America?

    Who are the American people? The question is not likely to have a unique natural answer, since there are degrees, overlaps, and mismatches, but conditions limit possibilities.
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  • Neocons in a Lather
    February 2016

    Neocons in a Lather

    With every Trumpian surge in the polls, Trump was said to have peaked. Yet he’s defied the conventional wisdom and is clearly enjoying every minute of his unbroken ascent.
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  • The Nationalist Moment
    February 2016

    The Nationalist Moment

    Respectable politicians are those who believe in international trade agreements, sing the praises of mass immigration, and insist that military force should be used to advance some abstract notion like democracy—whether under the auspices of the...
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  • Radical in Chief
    February 2016

    Radical in Chief

    American politicians and media people have been making much of what they perceive as a profound distinction between “radicalization” and “self-radicalization.”
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  • Dropping the Ball on Us
    February 2016

    Dropping the Ball on Us

    The New Year is in full swing, and with it new laws and regulations carefully designed to enrich the lives of Americans who are insane.
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  • Keep Your Powder Dry
    February 2016

    Keep Your Powder Dry

    Having failed to convince Congress three years ago to pass new gun-control laws requiring background checks on all gun purchases, the President had used every mass shooting since to rail against the current state of gun-control legislation.
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  • Panic on the Left
    February 2016

    Panic on the Left

    President Obama is manifestly an enemy of Christianity and a Muslim sympathizer, which goes a long way to explain his reaction to the attacks in Paris and afterward to the mass murder in San Bernardino.
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  • Drafting Our Daughters
    January 2016

    Drafting Our Daughters

    The leftist regime, incarnate in bold and belligerent Democrats and tepid, me-too Republicans, hates women, the same way it hates black people.
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  • The End of American Exceptionalism?
    January 2016

    The End of American Exceptionalism?

    Neoconservatives repeatedly try to take Reagan’s words and conform them to their own definition of American exceptionalism.
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  • The Politics of Air Strikes
    January 2016

    The Politics of Air Strikes

    To bomb or not to bomb? As I write, that is the question being debated in the Palace of Westminster.
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  • Putin, Planes, and Position
    January 2016

    Putin, Planes, and Position

    Russian President Vladimir Putin was furious following the late-November destruction of a Russian war plane by Turkish fighter jets over Syrian airspace. The Russians had been bombing “terrorist” positions inside war-torn Syria since September.
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  • Grey Lady in Rainbow Panties
    January 2016

    Grey Lady in Rainbow Panties

    The editors of the Times have abandoned, together with basic literacy, so much as the pretense of reportorial objectivity (perhaps without ever realizing that they have done so).
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  • Religion Is Always There
    January 2016

    Religion Is Always There

    The varied and complex relations between religion and power can be understood only by means of extensive comparisons, between nations and across time. Who better to demonstrate this than Prof. David Martin, the doyen of the comparative sociology...
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  • Flame of Hope
    January 2016

    Flame of Hope

    The 21st century has not so far been a happy time for American conservatives. It began with an appalling terrorist attack whose key perpetrators had taken advantage of our government’s insouciance toward mass immigration from the Third World.
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  • Of Paradigms and Penectomies
    January 2016

    Of Paradigms and Penectomies

    “Conservatives engage in rebellions, not revolutions.” How true, and what a way to begin a book.
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  • Protest Too Much
    January 2016

    Protest Too Much

    On the campuses of America, fascism lives, although these modern fascists lack the sartorial brilliance of Benito’s mobs.
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  • Trump Said What?
    January 2016

    Trump Said What?

    The nation held its breath in mid-December when GOP candidate Donald Trump dared to suggest that, in the wake of an ISIS-related terrorist attack on U.S. soil, all Muslim immigration should be halted, until “Congress can figure out what the hell...
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  • Science and Democracy
    December 2015

    Science and Democracy

    A virtue of America’s quadrennial election cycle is its success in revealing and giving form to whatever popular malaise has set in over the past four years, whether the results of the elections themselves address the disorder or not, and...
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  • Neocon Armageddon!
    December 2015

    Neocon Armageddon!

    That old agitator Mahatma Gandhi certainly knew his chops, and one of his aphorisms surely has resonance when we contemplate the Trump phenomenon: “First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.”
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  • Trouble in the House
    December 2015

    Trouble in the House

    The Ryan speakership is a response to the general perception of decay and dereliction on Capitol Hill. Mr. Trump and his patented yahooism are part of that response.
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  • Hearts and Minds
    December 2015

    Hearts and Minds

    Have you ever wondered what it was like to live through a sweeping cultural revolution? If you lived in France in late 1789, for instance, and you reviewed the events of the previous 12 months, you would have shaken your head in wonderment at...
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  • Moscow Notebook
    December 2015

    Moscow Notebook

    It won’t be the winter of Russian discontent. Western sanctions and low oil prices have harmed the economy—it contracted by 4.3 percent in the third quarter—but Putin’s approval rating is consistently well above 80 percent.
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  • Ignoring Dr. Hank
    December 2015

    Ignoring Dr. Hank

    A few years back I was spending the weekend with the designer Oscar de la Renta and his wife, and they took me along to dinner at a neighbor’s on Saturday night.
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  • House Speaker Ryan
    December 2015

    House Speaker Ryan

    It is fortunate for the Republicans that Democrats and liberals generally have a completely false impression of the meaning of the last two Congresses, though most of the GOP has an equally wrong one also.
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  • Italy’s Donald Trump
    November 2015

    Italy’s Donald Trump

    Politicians and businessmen do not always see eye to eye. In ancient Rome the political elite, the Senatorial Order, squabbled with the wealthy Knights of the Equestrian Order.
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  • Playing the Trump Card
    November 2015

    Playing the Trump Card

    Trump is doing a job other Republican presidential candidates won’t do: connecting the dots between the interrelated issues of mass immigration, trade (and America’s deindustrialization), and foreign policy.
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  • Dining With The Donald
    November 2015

    Dining With The Donald

    When Donald Trump started making noise about running for president, I knew next to nothing about him. Since I don’t watch television, I’m not sure whether I could even have identified him in a lineup.
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  • After <em>Obergefell</em>: What Now?
    November 2015

    After Obergefell: What Now?

    I have previously suggested in these pages that the Supreme Court’s recent decision in Obergefell v. Hodges may be the worst in the history of the Court.
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  • The Worst State
    November 2015

    The Worst State

    Things are pretty dismal all over the country, but some places are worse than others.
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  • Trump and the Culture of Political Correctness
    November 2015

    Trump and the Culture of Political Correctness

    How has Donald Trump become the leading contender for the Republican nomination? The missing piece of the puzzle is the artificiality of public life in the United States. In a land of chain stores, internet memes, pop-culture formulas, and...
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  • Who Hates Trump?
    November 2015

    Who Hates Trump?

    Politics is all about hatred. Never mind who you’re voting for: It’s who you’re voting against that really counts. And that’s why any disagreement I may have with Donald Trump’s actual policies is completely irrelevant.
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  • Boundaries
    November 2015

    Boundaries

    On a flank of the White Mountains not far from the Maine state line lies a small New Hampshire town called Albany, population 735.
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  • Two Experiments
    October 2015

    Two Experiments

    It is a commonplace among American conservatives that, at some point in the past, the way Americans understood their constitutional and cultural tradition diverged from the reality of the constitutional order established in 1787.
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  • Wrecking Ball
    October 2015

    Wrecking Ball

    If The Donald’s road to the White House is blocked—either by the Republican elites or by his own tendency to go too far—and he returns to TV land, he’ll have a hard time topping this one.
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  • Disenchanted With Globalism
    October 2015

    Disenchanted With Globalism

    The political story this year was supposed to be a familiar one: A member of the Bush family was going to begin a successful march to the Republican nomination, and a member of the Clinton family was going to do the same thing on the Democratic side.
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  • Nuclear <em>Baksheesh</em>
    October 2015

    Nuclear Baksheesh

    For several months Republicans and Democrats have been jawing over the nuclear “deal” with Iran. Unlike so many partisan debates, this one may actually involve issues of national security, but only if both sides are serious.
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  • The New Nationalism
    October 2015

    The New Nationalism

    During her short imprisonment for contempt of court, Kim Davis, the Rowan County, Kentucky, clerk who refused on religious grounds to issue marriage licenses to homosexual couples, was compared with Martin Luther King, Jr., Thomas Jefferson,...
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  • <em>Kennedy</em> v. <em>Kennedy</em>
    October 2015

    Kennedy v. Kennedy

    On the last day of August, Judge Richard J. Leon of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia found for March for Life in its suit against the Department of Health and Human Services, among other agencies.
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  • Humanity Lite
    September 2015

    Humanity Lite

    Since the 60’s, liberals have been talking about “victimless crimes,” offenses that are prosecutable by law but that liberals claim “hurt no one.”
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  • ¡Buena Suerte, Migra!
    September 2015

    ¡Buena Suerte, Migra!

    Ann Coulter credits Peter Brimelow’s famous essay published in National Review in 1992 with delivering the blinding revelation that opened her eyes to the social and political crisis precipitated by the Establishment’s immigration...
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  • Come Home, America
    September 2015

    Come Home, America

    Washington and Brussels were surprised by the Kremlin’s strong reaction to the ousting of pro-Russian Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych in February of last year. They shouldn’t have been.
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  • White Out
    September 2015

    White Out

    Hand it to Ann Coulter and Donald Trump: They know how to send the left into an apoplectic conniption.
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  • Band-Aids for the Corpse
    September 2015

    Band-Aids for the Corpse

    F.H. Buckley is rightly alarmed by present trends and admirably free of party propaganda. He realizes that Democrats as well as Republicans have contributed to the imperial presidency and provides good recent examples of this.
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  • The Tone of Trump
    September 2015

    The Tone of Trump

    Donald Trump reveals something to us about ourselves, if we are honest enough to face it: We care far too deeply about presidential politics and not enough about our actual problems.
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  • Britain Decides
    August 2015

    Britain Decides

    There’s something admirably old-fashioned about a British general election. Instead of the two years of incessant blather we get over here, the whole thing is over inside a month.
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  • Abolishing America
    August 2015

    Abolishing America

    June was a depressing month for genuine conservatives.
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  • Reversion to Balance
    July 2015

    Reversion to Balance

    The decline of once great powers, real and perceived, is a major theme of the early 21st century that is likely to become more pronounced as the century progresses and the balance of power, propelled by the shifting balance of energy and...
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  • Comparative Manufacturing Advantage
    July 2015

    Comparative Manufacturing Advantage

    President Barack Obama, during a May speech in Oregon, insisted that the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade deal is good for small-business workers, helps the middle class, and maintains U.S. trade power versus China, which is not a signatory...
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  • A Bubbling Crude
    July 2015

    A Bubbling Crude

    I turn to Garet Garrett when I’m in an elegiac mood, and surely these days my moods rival his in their darkness. He annoyed his fellow libertarian, the novelist and ideologue Rose Wilder Lane, to no end with what she called his “keening” note of...
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  • Energized for Liberty

    Energized for Liberty

    The Senate debate over extending three key sections of the egregiously misnamed USA PATRIOT Act is over, and the winner is . . . Sen. Rand Paul.
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  • Detroit: From Under the Rubble
    June 2015

    Detroit: From Under the Rubble

    Two weeks before Apple began selling its new Apple Watch, Shinola Detroit took out a full-page ad in the Wall Street Journal. Above a large photo of its analog watch, The Runwell, was the tag, “The Watch That’s Too Smart to Try and Be a Phone.”
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  • Manual Control
    June 2015

    Manual Control

    Russian political analyst Vladimir Pastukhov once wrote that state power, or vlast, and not law “holds a sacred status in Russia.” Russians, according to Pastukhov, experience state power as a “mystical entity,” a “life giving substance,” a...
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  • Policing and Profiling
    June 2015

    Policing and Profiling

    A growing nationwide disdain for police officers has resulted from several highly publicized shootings of “unarmed” minority men who have resisted arrest or attacked officers.
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  • Dig Deeper
    June 2015

    Dig Deeper

    People understand catastrophes. The everyday ebb and flow of history, in their own lives and in the world, is much harder for them to grasp.
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  • UVA: Facts <em>Versus</em> the Left’s Narrative
    June 2015

    UVA: Facts Versus the Left’s Narrative

    For a news professional, it is hard to say which is more discouraging: that Rolling Stone published an imaginary tale of gang rape from a crazy college girl without double-checking her story, or that no one at Rolling Stone was...
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  • Advancing the Conversation in Baltimore

    Advancing the Conversation in Baltimore

    In a press release, Attorney General Loretta Lynch explained that “Department officials heard from residents about concerns regarding the Baltimore Police Department and the lack of trust they feel exists between the police and the community.”
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  • Which KGB?
    May 2015

    Which KGB?

    Everyone in Moscow knew that the massive demonstration planned for March 1 was in some way meant to be dangerous. The mood harked back to the events that caused the 1917 Revolution, or the troubles on the streets that paved the way for Boris...
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  • Trigger Warnings
    May 2015

    Trigger Warnings

    In a May 21, 2014,Washington Post column, Kathleen Parker alerted readers to a phenomenon in higher education termed “trigger warnings.”
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  • Surveying America: A Plan for Growth
    May 2015

    Surveying America: A Plan for Growth

    Latin America has repeatedly failed to achieve the kind of settled distribution of property that could support a middle-class society.
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  • The Neocons Called the Tune
    May 2015

    The Neocons Called the Tune

    The April issue of Chronicles had just gone to press when the news broke: 47 Republican senators had signed an open letter to the Iranian leadership penned by neoconservative stalwart Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR).
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  • An American Sniper
    May 2015

    An American Sniper

    A galloglass was a professional warrior hired by an Irish chief. The practice of employing such men became common in the decades following the Norman invasion, when it became obvious that heavily armed and mail-clad fighters were needed to...
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  • Messalina’s Revenge
    May 2015

    Messalina’s Revenge

    In modern America the curse seems to have appeared with the consolidation of imperial government at home and abroad with the New Deal and World War II. Eleanor Roosevelt was in a class all by herself.
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  • Investing in the Future
    May 2015

    Investing in the Future

    “There is no more potent instrument of fate in 19th-century fiction than the legacy.” So writes a female columnist in Britain’s best newspaper, the Daily Telegraph, before going on to say some rude things about trust-fund babies.
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  • Scott Walker’s Main Chance

    Scott Walker’s Main Chance

    In the life of politicians, single moments stand out when a decision to act or not to act defines their character and shapes their future success. Calvin Coolidge’s stand against the Boston police strike of 1919 and Ronald Reagan’s firing in...
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  • France Gets a Lickin’

    France Gets a Lickin’

    In March, France was given a good spanking by the European Committee on Social Rights (ECSR). The issue under litigation was France’s brutishness in allowing the corporal punishment of children.
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  • Eternal Dividends

    Eternal Dividends

    No one could accuse M. Stanton Evans, who lost his battle with pancreatic cancer at age 80 on March 3, of becoming a professional conservative.
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  • A Cynic’s Dictionary: F-I
    April 2015

    A Cynic’s Dictionary: F-I

    Flag: A piece of cloth of no particular value or interest, that, when it comes to symbolize a nation, regardless of that body's importance, significance, affluence, or influence, takes on uncommon and indeed unnecessary grandeur and symbolism.
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  • 1865: The True American Revolution
    April 2015

    1865: The True American Revolution

    The standard opinion has it that, ever since they set foot on the new continent, the English settlers felt they were one people, Englishmen united by their common language, common origins, common enemies.
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  • Remember the Nazarenes: An Interview With Bishop Warduni
    April 2015

    Remember the Nazarenes: An Interview With Bishop Warduni

    According to the latest available figures, no fewer than two million Iraqis, many of them Christians, have been chased out of their homes by the militiamen of the Islamic State, and now their tragic plight may fall into oblivion amid the...
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  • Confessions of a Libertarian Activist
    April 2015

    Confessions of a Libertarian Activist

    I’ve been a libertarian activist since the age of 16 or so—long before the term libertarian became known and widely used by the general public. Indeed, when I announced my conversion to parents, friends, and associates I distinctly recall a...
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  • Society Precedes Government: Two Counterrevolutions
    April 2015

    Society Precedes Government: Two Counterrevolutions

    A successful War of Independence established 13 free and independent states in North America in 1783. This was followed, unfortunately for us, by the French Revolution and then by the 19th century, preeminently a time of violent government...
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  • Why They Fought
    April 2015

    Why They Fought

    Jean-François Revel was not a stupid man, and I thoroughly enjoyed the afternoon “we tired the sun with talking,” but as a political philosopher, he was a prisoner of the leftist ideology that treats terms like equality and...
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  • Gone With the Wind
    April 2015

    Gone With the Wind

    This year marks the 150th anniversary of Appomattox. In recent times, academics studying the Civil War have reached a striking degree of consensus about how that war should be understood, and its practical implications today.
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  • A Towering Genius, Greatly Missed
    April 2015

    A Towering Genius, Greatly Missed

    On April 1, 1815, Otto Eduard Leo pold von Bismarck was born on the family estate at Schönhausen near Berlin, in what used to be Prussia.
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  • Brian Williams’ Job

    Brian Williams’ Job

    At the heart of the Brian Williams affair lies, I think, not so much the question of his alleged brush with enemy fire in Iraq, but whether we should properly treat such people as working journalists or entertainers.
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  • Dabbling in DAPA
    April 2015

    Dabbling in DAPA

    In mid-February, U.S. District Judge Andrew S. Hanen issued an injunction enjoining the Obama administration from implementing the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents program (DAPA).
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  • Washington’s Foreign Policy Folly
    March 2015

    Washington’s Foreign Policy Folly

    A basic requirement of a wise and effective foreign policy is the ability to establish priorities and make tough choices. Unfortunately, U.S. officials seem increasingly incapable of accomplishing such a task.
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  • A Plague on Both Their Houses
    March 2015

    A Plague on Both Their Houses

    Now that a great quarrel has opened up between Muslims and the opponents, not of Islam per se, but of “radical” Islamist terrorists, conservatives are tempted, as they always are, to make friends with the enemies of their enemies.
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  • Quoth the Raven
    March 2015

    Quoth the Raven

    For the past six months the United States has been experiencing another of the racial fits that have recurred more or less regularly across the half-century since the civil-rights protests of the 1950’s and the Civil Rights Acts of the 60’s that...
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  • The Battle for the Middle
    March 2015

    The Battle for the Middle

    American politicians love to pretend that they care about the middle class, because they know that the middle class generally determines who gets elected. But once elected, politicians tend to serve those who finance their campaigns, and the...
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  • Idealists Without Illusions
    February 2015

    Idealists Without Illusions

    Like all relationships, the special transatlantic one is in a state of constant flux—warmer or cooler at different times, enhanced by empathy, marred by misunderstandings, riven by reality—but always affected by the personal qualities of the...
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  • The Future of Minority Culture(s)
    February 2015

    The Future of Minority Culture(s)

    Two challenging words of the title of this essay stand somehow between us and ourselves, so that we will have to get around the distortions unnecessarily presented by minority and culture in order to see the freedom and even the...
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  • Mongrels All! or, Slaves With New Masters
    February 2015

    Mongrels All! or, Slaves With New Masters

    Of late, our demographic soothsayers have been assuring us that by 2040 or thereabouts America will no longer be a Caucasian-majority country, and that with the eclipse of the white majority there will be, to belabor the obvious, no majority culture.
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  • LBJeb
    February 2015

    LBJeb

    You knew Jeb Bush was going to run for president; after all, assuming the worst is really the essence of conservatism. And, sure enough, he’s “actively exploring the possibility”—a half-measure that prefigures the weakness and tepidity of...
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  • Putin’s Uneasy Balancing Act
    February 2015

    Putin’s Uneasy Balancing Act

    “Putin, the master of the game, controls all the pieces on the chessboard and carefully divides up the areas of power,” writes influential French columnist Christine Ockrent in her most recent book, Les Oligarques.
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  • Unquantifiable Differences
    February 2015

    Unquantifiable Differences

    The biggest mystery and conundrum of our time is not whether Stalin died a natural death, or why the CIA had Kennedy killed, but the difference between the types of individual that rise socially in the West and, respectively, in Russia or China.
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  • Justice for All
    February 2015

    Justice for All

    Five years before Michael Brown and Eric Garner would become household names, there was Mark Barmore.
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  • Rudderless at the Pentagon
    January 2015

    Rudderless at the Pentagon

    Chuck Hagel’s abrupt departure from the Pentagon on November 24 became inevitable after weeks of disagreement with the White House over strategy against the Islamic State (IS).
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  • The Exterminator
    January 2015

    The Exterminator

    As John McCain and Lindsey Graham hector us to invade the Middle East once more, we might pause to reflect on a 2001 article published by Zev Chafets, an American-Israeli journalist who is currently the Likud Party’s unofficial spokesman.
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  • Stomaching ISIS
    January 2015

    Stomaching ISIS

    I was not surprised that Chuck Hagel had to go. After all, he was among the very few in governments of late to have ever seen combat, not to mention to have been wounded. Men of his ilk do not draw their swords at the drop of a hat—unlike...
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  • A Racial Revolution
    January 2015

    A Racial Revolution

    “My tradition is not to remark on cases where there still may be an investigation,” declared President Obama as he upstaged New York Mayor Bill DeBlasio on December 3, speaking from the White House Tribal Nations Conference.
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  • Benjamin Franklin’s American Dream
    January 2015

    Benjamin Franklin’s American Dream

    Today’s preferred way to think about immigration and the nation-state is exemplified in the title of a 1964 pamphlet that the Anti-Defamation League published posthumously under the name of John F. Kennedy: A Nation of Immigrants.
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  • Insecure Liberalism
    January 2015

    Insecure Liberalism

    As I was reading my monthly Bible—guess what that is—I came across an enthusiastic review of a book, written by a French political philosopher, Pierre Manent, entitled Metamorphoses of the City. I rushed to buy a copy.
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  • The Revenge of the Confederacy
    January 2015

    The Revenge of the Confederacy

    The American political divide is no longer between Republicans and Democrats, conservatives and liberals, religionists and secularists. It is between roughly two halves of the country, each of which would be perfectly happy to see the other...
    Read more
  • 4.0 and You’re Out!
    December 2014

    4.0 and You’re Out!

    When I was a junior at the Trinity School in New York, Mr. Clarence Bruner-Smith, head of the Upper School, assured me that I had an excellent chance of being accepted at Yale if I accepted the editorship of the school literary magazine.
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  • The Golden State’s Lavender Jacobins
    December 2014

    The Golden State’s Lavender Jacobins

    You knew it would come to this. So did I. And yet one is still surprised by the sheer boldness of it all.
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  • Anarcho-Tyranny, Here and There
    December 2014

    Anarcho-Tyranny, Here and There

    In recent decades, conflict within the broader conservative universe has witnessed the increasing marginalization of traditionalists, who consistently refuse to accommodate their detractors’ leftist ideological worldview.
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  • We Need a Time Out
    December 2014

    We Need a Time Out

    The Center for Immigration Studies recently issued two reports that show how transformative mass immigration has been in recent decades. The first study focused on the number of immigrants now living in the United States.
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  • Putin’s Valdai Speech
    December 2014

    Putin’s Valdai Speech

    In the lands of “Real Socialism,” four or five decades ago, it was a standard practice to denounce the “enemies of the people” without actually quoting their incriminating statements.
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  • An Affirmative Action
    December 2014

    An Affirmative Action

    The U.S. Supreme Court decision Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action, issued last spring, upheld a 2006 citizen-approved ballot initiative in Michigan to amend the state constitution to ban reverse discrimination in public...
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  • Watching Is Out—So Watch Out!
    November 2014

    Watching Is Out—So Watch Out!

    I have been receiving so many requests lately for lifestyle advice, tips on public relations and media etiquette (not to mention recommendations about health and beauty maintenance), that I just haven’t been able to keep up with them all.
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  • The Missing Opposition
    November 2014

    The Missing Opposition

    Although in general not terribly bright, Republican leaders are smart enough to take care of their own power and profits, which was all along their only real goal. The mistake is in assuming that they ever had any ideas or principles to begin with.
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  • Getting Nixon Right
    November 2014

    Getting Nixon Right

    In November 1972 I voted for the re-election of President Nixon. Granted, it was only an elementary-school straw poll, but I was still thrilled when he carried the student body by a three-to-one margin.
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  • Underground Man
    November 2014

    Underground Man

    Was it fair of Solzhenitsyn to call Peter the Great “a mediocre man, if not a barbarian”? I honestly don’t know.
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  • Another Unwinnable War
    November 2014

    Another Unwinnable War

    Two months after the beginning of the U.S. bombing campaign against the Islamic State (IS, formerly ISIS) and one month after President Obama announced his strategy for fighting the group, the area under jihadist control continues to expand.
    Read more
  • The Quintessential Democratic Politician
    November 2014

    The Quintessential Democratic Politician

    Any ruler must somehow be subordinate to the nature of the society he rules. But in all societies other than democracies, the rulers have some leeway, precisely because as rulers they set the course that the body of citizens must follow.
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  • Political Poltergeists
    November 2014

    Political Poltergeists

    As the midterm elections approach, I feel a bit like a migraine sufferer. Nonsense phrases start buzzing in the back of my head, and celebrity politicos begin to display a sinister aura.
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  • Answering the Scottish Question
    November 2014

    Answering the Scottish Question

    The people of Scotland have spoken. Scotland has voted not to secede from the United Kingdom and to remain in her long-standing union with England and Wales.
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  • Soul Searching
    November 2014

    Soul Searching

    Russians have bragged to themselves about their souls for ages, but for the past hundred years or so, other European nations, Britain foremost, have been pitching in as well.
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  • In Your Heart, You Know He’s Still Right
    November 2014

    In Your Heart, You Know He’s Still Right

    Under the slogan, “In Your Heart You Know He’s Right,” Goldwater suffered a monumental defeat at the hands of Lyndon Johnson, who garnered 61.9 percent of the vote, more than any presidential candidate except George Washington.
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  • Six of One
    November 2014

    Six of One

    Since his election to the Senate in 1984, Mitch McConnell has been the bête noir of Kentucky progressives.
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  • Perry <em>Potestas</em>
    October 2014

    Perry Potestas

    Rick Perry, believe me, is no more going to prison than I’m going to bounce into his office one fine day to sign him up for an Obama fundraising dinner (an occasion prospectively disadvantageous to the health and well-being of both statesmen,...
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  • Pedestaled Power
    October 2014

    Pedestaled Power

    A stroll across the majority of university campuses, five minutes of channel surfing, the U.S. Supreme Court’s First Amendment case law, popular behavior and that of the American elite—these are proof positive that Christianity in the 21st...
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  • A Cynic's Dictionary
    October 2014

    A Cynic's Dictionary

    cynic (’sin-ick) n.—One who no longer believes in the comforting illusions and protective half-truths that others use unreflectively to get through their lives.
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  • The Unnatural Aristocracy
    October 2014

    The Unnatural Aristocracy

    A little-remembered provision of the U.S. Constitution: “No title of nobility shall be granted by the United States” (Article I, Section 9).
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  • War on Whites
    October 2014

    War on Whites

    Alabama Republican congressman Mo Brooks generated outrage among the usual suspects in early August by telling radio talk-show host Laura Ingraham that the Obama administration’s push for amnesty for illegal immigrants is “a part of the war on...
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  • Subgroup Strife in  the Golden State
    September 2014

    Subgroup Strife in the Golden State

    It wasn’t supposed to end like this. We were all going to “get along” in a diverse, multicultural paradise, led by our brilliant universities. But in a pattern sure to spread across America, the ethnic strife in California is increasing, not...
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  • The End of the United Kingdom?
    September 2014

    The End of the United Kingdom?

    Of course Scotland won’t leave the United Kingdom. That was the conventional wisdom when the referendum on Scottish independence was announced two years ago. But today no one is quite certain what the outcome will be.
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  • Decline and Fall
    September 2014

    Decline and Fall

    I am very far from original in noticing similarities in the histories of Rome and America—republics that became empires. The decline and fall of the former has often been thought to foretell the fate of the latter.
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  • Strategic Blunders
    September 2014

    Strategic Blunders

    It has been a summer of major strategic blunders by the United States and Russia over Ukraine and by the United States in the Middle East, where the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS, now renamed simply the Islamic Caliphate) has emerged as a...
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  • Anniversary of Lies
    September 2014

    Anniversary of Lies

    August 10 marked the 50th anniversary of President Lyndon Johnson’s signing of the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, which Congress had passed three days earlier.
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  • Spooking the Left’s Hobby Horse
    September 2014

    Spooking the Left’s Hobby Horse

    Based on reactions from the political left to Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc., one would think that American women have been stripped of fundamental constitutional protections.
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  • Neocon Nightmare
    August 2014

    Neocon Nightmare

    I have a recurring nightmare in which the war criminals who lied us into Iraq reappear to mock the hundreds of thousands they murdered in cold blood, repeating the same lies, the same rationalizations, the same mindless slogans that lured us into...
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  • Carry On
    August 2014

    Carry On

    The modern world abounds in modern heresies. One might say that modernity itself is a heresy—modernity understood in the broadest possible terms as the antithesis of the traditional.
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  • Vocation and the Humane Economy
    August 2014

    Vocation and the Humane Economy

    The dominance of economics is a fact of life today. For some that is a good thing. An editorial writer for the old Rocky Mountain News told me that politics was a bad way to settle public issues; economics was a better one.
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  • Chinese Exclusion
    August 2014

    Chinese Exclusion

    Five years ago, the California state legislature voted to apologize to the Chinese for former laws that discriminated against them, including the federal government’s Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, which California congressmen championed.
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  • Silver or Lead: The Reverse Assimilation of the Southwest
    August 2014

    Silver or Lead: The Reverse Assimilation of the Southwest

    Texas attorney general and gubernatorial candidate Greg Abbot committed what is commonly called a political gaffe earlier this year when he said that Mass immigration from Mexico means the importation of Mexican corruption and the steady erosion...
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  • The Fruits of Fraud
    August 2014

    The Fruits of Fraud

    The worst thing about the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1973 legalization of abortion in all 50 states and U.S. territories has not been the 55 million—and counting—dead babies, as horrible as that has been, but the damage it has caused to the rule of...
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  • Country
    August 2014

    Country

    Every time I watch the above scene from Gladiator, that powerful movie about the decadence of Roman imperial government, the lamentation of Maximus for the unfulfilled promise of Rome and for the long-defunct republic turns my thoughts to...
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  • Recess Games
    August 2014

    Recess Games

    “Supreme Court sharply limits presidential power on recess appointments.” Thus read the headline in the Los Angeles Times after the High Court’s decision in National Labor Relations Board v. Canning.
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  • Mr. Kennan’s America
    July 2014

    Mr. Kennan’s America

    No admirer of George F. Kennan’s should be surprised by the angry tone of the reviews his recently published Diaries has been receiving. Of the several I have read, in the British as well as the American press, all were, to some extent or...
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  • Intransigent Diplomacy
    July 2014

    Intransigent Diplomacy

    There is a disturbing pattern over the decades in Washington’s negotiations with countries deemed to be adversaries. It is a tendency to adopt a rigid stance marked by unrealistic demands that make achieving a settlement virtually impossible.
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  • Mencken and the World Warmonger
    July 2014

    Mencken and the World Warmonger

    As World War I is remembered in this year of its hundredth anniversary, one rivalry continues to resonate across America. It isn’t between the Allies and the Central Powers, or between two houses of European royalty, but between two countrymen:...
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  • Is There Hope?
    July 2014

    Is There Hope?

    Think of what we’re trying to do: upend the biggest, deadliest, most intractable apparatus of power this world has ever seen. The sheer scope of the Leviathan State is so daunting that any patriot who seeks to take it on is immediately faced...
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  • How Not to Succeed in Washington
    July 2014

    How Not to Succeed in Washington

    When I was younger and precociously interested in politics (I subscribed to National Review and looked forward to Firing Line every Sunday), I knew who George Kennan was. He was the brilliant author of the Containment Doctrine who had later gone...
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  • Stalking the Bear
    June 2014

    Stalking the Bear

    Washington desperately needed a new enemy, so the timing of Putin’s bloodless “invasion” of Crimea was just right.
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  • The Folly of Overreach
    June 2014

    The Folly of Overreach

    To a casual observer it might seem that President Barack Obama’s four-nation tour of East Asia, which took him to Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, and the Philippines, came at a time of America’s undisputed global predominance.
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  • Endorsing Demise
    June 2014

    Endorsing Demise

    There is a distressing history of foreign insurgent groups manipulating U.S. political figures, policymakers, and opinion leaders into supporting their causes.
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  • The Long March Through the Constitution
    June 2014

    The Long March Through the Constitution

    "The transition from states’ rights to unitary nationalism, i.e., domestic imperialism, was the most significant development in American politics. This marks one of the worst fears of the framers coming to fruition, tyranny."
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  • Moscow Rules
    May 2014

    Moscow Rules

    Spending the first three days of spring in snowy Moscow, especially after being in balmy Yalta and Sevastopol, is not my idea of fun.
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  • CPAC Moves to Rockford?
    May 2014

    CPAC Moves to Rockford?

    Conservatives flock from around the country to CPAC, expecting to advance the movement and gain some insight into what’s going on with “our” government.
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  • Not What It Should Be
    May 2014

    Not What It Should Be

    Yeah, it was a crisis—though few who, like the author, were sentient during the 50’s understood completely what was going on around us.
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  • The Limits of Russophilia
    May 2014

    The Limits of Russophilia

    Despite all the media attention devoted to it, Russia’s incursion into Ukraine poses no threat to the United States.
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  • Russia’s Way Back
    May 2014

    Russia’s Way Back

    Liberalism’s Glorious Age of parliamentary democracy, nation building and national consolidation, free trade, and empire, of which Great Britain was the chief power and paramount symbol, reached a catastrophic close in 1914.
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  • Picturing a Lesbian Wedding

    Picturing a Lesbian Wedding

    Americans are getting a taste of unintended consequences from overly broad public-accommodation laws enacted in the past half-century. Christian business owners are especially burdened when individuals practicing what once was considered...
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  • Repudiating the Debt
    April 2014

    Repudiating the Debt

    Since Reagan, however, intellectual political life has gone topsy-turvy. Conservatives and allegedly “free-market” economists have turned handsprings trying to find new reasons why “deficits don’t matter,” why we should all relax and enjoy the...
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  • The World Goes Its Way
    April 2014

    The World Goes Its Way

    A French writer argues that “humanity” has become the accepted “version of the universal” in contemporary Western thought, functioning as the “action” of modern democratic polity.
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  • Bathroom Break

    Bathroom Break

    On January 1, the state imposed on children Assembly Bill 1266, mandating that all bathrooms, gym showers, and sports teams in public schools be open to everyone, regardless of sex. The bill’s official title is the School Success and Opportunity...
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  • Flyover Math
    April 2014

    Flyover Math

    In January, George Mason University published a survey of the financial solvency of our country’s 50 states. Illinois came in at 48th place, just in front of Connecticut and New Jersey. The Land of Lincoln caught a bit of a break, it seems.
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  • The Most Truly Conservative Person . . .
    April 2014

    The Most Truly Conservative Person . . .

    When Margaret Thatcher died last April, the obsequies were at times almost drowned by vitriolic voices celebrating her demise. There were howls of joy from old enemies, street parties, and a puer­ile campaign to make the Wizard of Oz song “Ding,...
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  • The Uses of American Government
    April 2014

    The Uses of American Government

    That the republic has degenerated from a Protestant-inflected localized republic to a centralized bureaucratic imperial state is something most conservatives take for granted. The reason for such a transformation, however, sometimes becomes more...
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  • The Person Is Always Becoming
    April 2014

    The Person Is Always Becoming

    Everyone in the Western world writes from left to right, so Michael Novak’s title is more cute than revealing. The subtitle, on the other hand, makes a claim: that he moved from at one point in his life being a liberal to an admission that,...
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  • The Dogma in the Manger
    April 2014

    The Dogma in the Manger

    Since 1984, when Nineteen Eighty-Four was published in Russia, I have taken the view that the clever understand what transpires there without need for fresh explanations, while the daft, no matter how ingenious one’s explanations or...
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  • Little Yellow Bastards
    April 2014

    Little Yellow Bastards

    One of life’s safest bets is that, following a visit by a Japanese premier to the shrine that honors the nation’s war dead, a lot of Chinese megacrooks and inheritors of the greatest murderer of all time will cry foul, and lots of buffoons of the...
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  • Lies, Damn Lies, and RFRA
    April 2014

    Lies, Damn Lies, and RFRA

    The headline in the New York Times trumpeted the paper’s approval: “Arizona Governor vetoes bill on refusal of services to gays.” Had Jan Brewer not done the right thing, the nefarious bill passed by the Arizona legislature “would have...
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  • The Way of Perfection
    March 2014

    The Way of Perfection

    Paradoxically, Westerners of every faith and political opinion seem perennially unhappy with Western society, despite the West’s assurance that it is the best, most fair, most free, most enlightened, and most humane way of life in human history.
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  • In Praise of Geopolitics
    March 2014

    In Praise of Geopolitics

    The noun geopolitics and the adjective geopolitical are increasingly present in media discourse on world affairs. In principle, this is a good thing.
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  • Did You Hear the One About Syria?
    March 2014

    Did You Hear the One About Syria?

    From the top of the mountain that overlooks my Swiss chalet I can almost see Lake Geneva on a clear day, but thankfully, what I cannot see are the armies of so-called diplomats, flunkies, arms dealers, professional wallet lifters, con men,...
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  • Hating Your Own

    Hating Your Own

    Last May, an unnamed friend of U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron was quoted referring to the Conservative Party’s base as “mad, swivel-eyed loons.” This extraordinary outburst illustrates the extent of the rift between Cameron and a large...
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  • High on Federalism
    February 2014

    High on Federalism

    Even the federal government has stepped aside and allowed the pot sales. Under the Controlled Substances Act, the sales in Colorado violate federal law.
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  • Impractical Solutions
    February 2014

    Impractical Solutions

    Mark Levin, in his best-selling book The Liberty Amendments, is absolutely right about two things: First, the Courts, president, and Congress are not playing the roles assigned to them by the Constitution.
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  • Obama: Our American Idol
    January 2014

    Obama: Our American Idol

    “Hell,” as Thomas Hobbes astutely noted several centuries ago, “is truth glimpsed too late.” As in the case of Barack H. Obama, self-anointed messiah? I should certainly imagine so.
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  • No Peeking
    January 2014

    No Peeking

    I promised myself I’d stay out of local politics once I moved up here to Sonoma County, California, but this story is too good to pass up.
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  • Updike's Grandfather
    January 2014

    Updike's Grandfather

    A poll of American historians, not long ago, chose James Buchanan as “the worst” American president. But judgments of “best” and “worst” in history are not eternal and indisputable truths.
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  • The Case Against Political Consensus
    December 2013

    The Case Against Political Consensus

    Jeffrey Bell is perhaps the most experienced conservative political advisor in Washington, D.C. Once a key Reagan campaign advisor, Bell later became a political candidate himself, scoring a stunning primary upset against a seated Republican...
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  • A Silver Pen in His Mouth
    November 2013

    A Silver Pen in His Mouth

    Truth to tell, I find myself in a similar predicament vis-à-vis Cockburn. When I began work on this review, I want to aver, I intended it to be a very favorable portrait.
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  • Too Big to Jail
    December 2013

    Too Big to Jail

    “Even if you don’t have the authorities—and frankly I didn’t have the authorities for anything—if you take charge people will follow.” So said Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson, Jr., former CEO of Goldman Sachs, to the Washington Post on...
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  • One Big Thing
    November 2013

    One Big Thing

    Devouring Freedom is substantially a useful history of the spending wars between America’s two main political parties since 1932, culminating in the years since 2009 when Barack Obama became president of the United States.
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  • Blowing Bubbles
    October 2013

    Blowing Bubbles

    Between 2000 and 2005 I found myself spending an increasing amount of time scratching my head. I had been researching and investing in financial-services stocks since 1992, but what I saw during that five-year span confounded me.
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  • Plausible Deniability: The U.S. Assassination Program
    October 2013

    Plausible Deniability: The U.S. Assassination Program

    It’s interesting that in 2009, as Erik Prince, the former Navy SEAL who founded Blackwater USA, was distancing himself from his creation, one witness in the numerous federal investigations of Blackwater claimed that the company’s contractors...
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  • “Not a Slam Dunk”: Syria and Chemical Weapons
    October 2013

    “Not a Slam Dunk”: Syria and Chemical Weapons

    On August 31, President Obama announced that he would seek congressional approval for military action against Syria, in response to chemical-weapons attacks that took place outside Damascus ten days earlier.
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  • A President at Golf
    October 2013

    A President at Golf

    The confusions of our day are so many and so inherent that we have no time or attention to spare for empty issues or nonproblems. The remarkable situation of President Barack Obama is one that deserves some restraint in judgment, for we may soon...
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  • Gay Marriage: The Last Chance
    September 2013

    Gay Marriage: The Last Chance

    Gay rights have come a long way in a hurry. Ten years ago sodomy was still a crime in many states. The Supreme Court found state laws banning sodomy constitutional as recently as 1986 (Bowers).
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  • Horses and Carriages
    September 2013

    Horses and Carriages

    I don’t know whether I buy completely into Mary Eberstadt’s arresting title. How does anybody “lose” God the Father Almighty, Maker of Heaven and Earth (as the Nicene Creed impressively denominates Him)?
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  • Amnesty, for the Record
    September 2013

    Amnesty, for the Record

    It is not a stretch, perhaps, to regard the Senate vote of over two thirds (68-32) in favor of a mass amnesty of illegal immigrants as signaling the eclipse of the historic American people, those brave and liberty-loving folk who created the...
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  • A Scandalous Presidency
    July 2013

    A Scandalous Presidency

    “Unfortunately you’ve grown up hearing voices that incessantly warn of government as nothing more than some separate, sinister entity that’s at the root of all of our problems,” President Barack Obama told students at Ohio State on May 5.
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  • A Modest Proposal for Speech Control
    July 2013

    A Modest Proposal for Speech Control

    Can we be adult about this? Can we finally say publicly what so many people believe privately—namely, that the whole Bill of Rights thing was a nice idea in its day, but it’s time to move on?
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  • Cigarette Holders, Nicotine Gum
    July 2013

    Cigarette Holders, Nicotine Gum

    Is President Obama a “change agent” on the level of Franklin D. Roosevelt, with a New New Deal comparable to FDR’s New Deal?
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  • Hell-Bent: Why Gay Marriage Was Inevitable
    July 2013

    Hell-Bent: Why Gay Marriage Was Inevitable

    Like it or not, gay marriage is here to stay. The Supreme Court ruling matters little. That was the case well before oral arguments were heard, and not for legal reasons.
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  • Take the Money and Run: Entitlement Politics
    June 2013

    Take the Money and Run: Entitlement Politics

    As New York City’s mayoral campaign kicked into overdrive earlier this spring, the New York Times saw fit to question the viability of Republican candidate Joe Lhota, former chairman of the Metropolitan Transit Authority. With all the...
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  • The Horrible Politics of "Equality for All"
    June 2013

    The Horrible Politics of "Equality for All"

    Equality is a pernicious and dangerous political policy, but that’s exactly what President Obama declared in full voice in his Second Inaugural Address in January as the cause and preoccupation of his administration for the next four years.
    Read more
  • Of Presidents and Guns
    June 2013

    Of Presidents and Guns

    Under our first president, the value of the Second Amendment was tested when George Washington faced the possibility of confronting armed citizens of the United States.
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  • Conservative Relatives

    Conservative Relatives

    Howard Phillips, a giant of the conservative movement and a founding member of the New Right, passed away on April 20 at the age of 72.
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  • Fiscal Miffed

    Fiscal Miffed

    The House of Representatives, at 10:57 p.m. on January 1, passed the Fiscal Cliff bill, with Republicans voting 2 to 1 against it. Speaker Boehner’s negotiations with President Obama had been a disaster.
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  • Facts and Opinions
    March 2013

    Facts and Opinions

    “I think it’s been very hard for Speaker Boehner and Republican Leader McConnell to accept the fact that taxes on the wealthiest Americans should go up a little bit, as part of an overall deficit reduction package.”
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  • Neocons in the Dock
    March 2013

    Neocons in the Dock

    The nomination of Chuck Hagel as secretary of defense has sparked a firestorm of opposition from Israel’s fifth column in the United States. It is a useful example of just how the Jewish state’s parasitic relationship with America works.
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  • Democracy and the Golden Mean
    March 2013

    Democracy and the Golden Mean

    A naive visitor arriving in the United States from abroad might conclude from the popular emphasis on “moderation” in contemporary American political discourse that Americans live under a government that represents a moderate theory of the...
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  • Frost/Nixon
    March 2013

    Frost/Nixon

    David Frost is a schizophrenic. His creative personality bestrides the Atlantic ocean. When he’s at home in England, Sir David, as he’s known, fronts daytime-television panels and gives splendid summer parties at the country home he shares...
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  • Democracy: The Tower of Babel
    February 2013

    Democracy: The Tower of Babel

    Democracy was born as a protest against what was felt to be an oppression of man by man, a rebellion against some men having the nerve to behave as if they had a natural right to command their fellow men—whether to enslave them, to lead them, or...
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  • Institutionalizing Compassion
    February 2013

    Institutionalizing Compassion

    Writing in the mid-1980’s, Forrest McDonald observed that America’s founders would have recognized their handiwork as late as the early 1960’s, but not after. Despite technological changes, the Civil War, the Progressive Era, the New Deal, and...
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  • The Reds and the Blues
    February 2013

    The Reds and the Blues

    It has become commonplace to observe that the American people are now divided into two distinct camps, roughly approximated by the opposing voters in the recent presidential election.
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  • Making More of the House
    January 2013

    Making More of the House

    Throughout the 2012 political season, attention was fixed on the contest between President Obama and Mitt Romney. A few other races garnered some media attention, but Americans treated the presidential election as the Super Bowl of politics.
    Read more
  • The Folly of Propositional Democracy
    January 2013

    The Folly of Propositional Democracy

    California continues its essential role as the proving ground for bad ideas. The latest is the demolition of “popular” initiatives to decide important issues.
    Read more
  • Petitioning Satan
    January 2013

    Petitioning Satan

    Talk of secession is in the air. A number of internet petitions from several states, asking to be allowed to leave the Union, have garnered tens of thousands of signatures.
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  • How Conservatives Could Win
    January 2013

    How Conservatives Could Win

    Republicans, after their comprehensive defeat on November 6, have been going through an identity crisis. Defeated Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown said, “We need to be a larger tent party.”
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  • High Times for Democracy
    January 2013

    High Times for Democracy

    When George McGovern died, aged 90, two weeks before the last general election, the obituaries rightly praised his long and fitfully distinguished record as a U.S. representative and senator, his years of military service, his plucky presidential...
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  • Dead Souls
    January 2013

    Dead Souls

    Barack Obama’s second presidential triumph has left many American conservatives feeling stranded. It is as if they have become aliens in their native land.
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  • The Flexible Second Term
    January 2013

    The Flexible Second Term

    The presidential election of 2012 was no ordinary contest. The University of Colorado’s political-science department had developed a model, based on the state of the U.S. economy, that had accurately predicted the outcome of every presidential...
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  • One Crisis Averted
    January 2013

    One Crisis Averted

    Barack Obama’s re-election, while socially, culturally, and morally disastrous for the country, may prove the lesser of two evils when it comes to foreign policy, according to some pundits.
    Read more
  • Freedom From Religion
    December 2012

    Freedom From Religion

    As the presidential campaign came to a close, religious questions sneaked surreptitiously into the national debate.
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  • Diplomacy Good and Bad
    December 2012

    Diplomacy Good and Bad

    These two volumes shed considerable light on the fateful events of 1945-46, events determinative of much that followed in American foreign relations.
    Read more
  • Turkey's Gamble
    December 2012

    Turkey's Gamble

    Following the AKP (Justice and Development Party) victory in February 2002, Turkey’s clout has been steadily increasing in the Balkans, the Arab world, and the predominantly Muslim regions of the former Soviet Union.
    Read more
  • Dashed Hopes and Neocons
    December 2012

    Dashed Hopes and Neocons

    For once, we actually had a candidate, but as Ron Paul retires and his son does his best to sully the family brand name, the future of the movement he inspired is in doubt.
    Read more
  • To Call a Rose a Rose
    December 2012

    To Call a Rose a Rose

    Political correctness is a politically correct name for hypocrisy, but I have long noted that its practitioners share one peculiar characteristic: They don’t know what to call themselves.
    Read more
  • Romney's Retreat
    December 2012

    Romney's Retreat

    Romney’s silence on social and cultural issues does not mean that they have lost their importance. Indeed, if Romney has won (this issue went to press on October 31), it will have been because of those issues, for the simple reason that no...
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  • The Democrats' Bait and Switch
    November 2012

    The Democrats' Bait and Switch

    Former Ohio Governor Ted Strickland told the Democratic convention that Barack Obama was an “economic patriot” and blasted Mitt Romney for being an “outsourcing pioneer.” That is certainly the theme of the Obama campaign in the industrial Midwest.
    Read more
  • The Magnetic Chain of Humanity
    November 2012

    The Magnetic Chain of Humanity

    With respect to the equality proposition, Alvis asserts that the only interpretation of equality consistent with the Declaration as a whole may be concisely expressed, “Government exists for the sake of all the governed.”
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  • Why Democracy Doesn't Work
    November 2012

    Why Democracy Doesn't Work

    Critical stands against democracy, when not simply ignored or mechanically rejected as mere fascist outbursts, are usually met with a supposedly wise objection: You may be right, except that you’re targeting an imperfect form of democracy.
    Read more
  • Beyond National Socialism
    November 2012

    Beyond National Socialism

    In the past two centuries, democracy has followed two principal courses: the socialist one in Europe, and the nationalist one in the United States.
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  • How We Got Here
    November 2012

    How We Got Here

    Chilton Williamson’s illuminating enterprise—and let me assure you, it does illuminate—is to examine democracy’s course since the publication, not quite two centuries ago, of Democracy in America.
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  • Maistre in the Dock
    October 2012

    Maistre in the Dock

    In September 2010, Émile Perreau-Saussine, age 37, was rushed to Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge, U.K., with chest pains. The junior physician on staff misdiagnosed his condition and thus failed to prevent his death hours later of a massive...
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  • It's Ryan
    October 2012

    It's Ryan

    As a Catholic from the Midwest, Ryan embodies the type of voters the GOP ticket must win to capture the White House. It is difficult to see how Romney wins if he fails to gain the Catholic vote or to win a number of major Midwestern states.
    Read more
  • VENONA
    September 2012

    VENONA

    Recently, a Gail Collins rant in NYRB described “How Texas Inflicts Bad Textbooks on Us,” claiming that the economic power of that state’s educational system forced publishers to kowtow to the allegedly primitive and superstitious standards...
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  • Worst Secretary of State in History
    September 2012

    Worst Secretary of State in History

    Mrs. Clinton arguably has shown herself to be the worst secretary of state in U.S. history. The style and substance of her foreign policymaking have undermined our national security. Overall, she has made a significant contribution to the world...
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  • Calling a Spade a Spade
    September 2012

    Calling a Spade a Spade

    A proposed addition to U.K. hate-crime legislation (Equality Act 2010) could make outlaws of countless schoolchildren who use the word fat or fatty, considering it a crime on par with racism and homophobia.
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  • Roberts Helps Congress Evade the Constitution
    September 2012

    Roberts Helps Congress Evade the Constitution

    Chief Justice John Roberts left U.S. Supreme Court watchers dumbfounded. Before the release of the opinion in National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius, pundits expected the healthcare case to turn on the Commerce Clause...
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  • A Mayor for London
    August 2012

    A Mayor for London

    Welcome to Britain. The day I arrived, just as London’s mayor officially declared the city open for the Olympic Games, there were two-hour lines to pass through border controls at Heathrow, and that was just for us lucky British passport holders.
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  • Storming the Castle Doctrine
    July 2012

    Storming the Castle Doctrine

    Agitators are using the Trayvon Martin shooting to push for the repeal of state Stand Your Ground and Castle Doctrine laws.
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  • The Soros Left Guns for ALEC
    July 2012

    The Soros Left Guns for ALEC

    Vote for Chicagoland politics, get Chicagoland politics. Inspired by President Obama’s slash-and-burn tactics on his opponents, Democrats, radical labor, and left-liberal activists have begun full Saul Alinsky-Bill Ayres-style assaults on...
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  • Buckley for the Masses
    July 2012

    Buckley for the Masses

    Overly committed as he was to supposedly universal political ideals and to the spread of American liberal democracy throughout the world, William F. Buckley, Jr., was not my kind of conservative.
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  • One of Them
    June 2012

    One of Them

    I’ve always found “white nationalism” to be an unsavory phenomenon, a reductionist and grossly materialist (in the Marxist sense) ideology with a deservedly bad reputation.
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  • What Have They Wrought?
    May 2012

    What Have They Wrought?

    In spring 2005, President George W. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney were beginning their second term in office. They were expending some “political capital,” as Bush put it, advancing their Social Security reform plan.
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  • "I'm a Republican, But..."
    May 2012

    "I'm a Republican, But..."

    At a recent dinner party, a Republican senator in the Wyoming legislature remarked that the most common personal call she receives from her constituents begins with, “I’m a Republican, but . . . ,” and ends with a request for some or another...
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  • Newt Rocks!

    Newt Rocks!

    I read in a recent New York Times article of a new conundrum for Republican presidential candidates; to wit, what music they can play, and what music they can’t, at rallies whose purpose is the extrusion of Barack Obama from national political life.
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  • The End of a Myth
    April 2012

    The End of a Myth

    “That was the summer of seventy-three,” writes Forrest McDonald. “Remember it well, and cherish the memory, for things will never be that good again.”
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  • An American Revolution
    April 2012

    An American Revolution

    On January 17—less than 24 hours after presenting his credentials—the new U.S. ambassador to Russia, Michael McFaul, met with a group of Russian opposition figures, “civil-society activists,” and street-demonstration leaders at the U.S. embassy...
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  • Beating the Left at Their Own Game
    April 2012

    Beating the Left at Their Own Game

    Leftists love to obsess about hate. It seems to be on their tongues all the time, and it may have already surpassed racist as their expletive of choice to hurl at conservatives, traditionalists, Middle Americans, and other folks they detest.
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  • The Inner Logic of Civil Rights
    March 2012

    The Inner Logic of Civil Rights

    As everyone knows, ideas have consequences—some immediate, others slowly unraveling as the idea gradually takes root in the public mind. The latter is precisely what happened with the idea that initiated the civil-rights movement.
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  • Paul's Last Hurrah
    March 2012

    Paul's Last Hurrah

    At this point it is clear that Rep. Ron Paul is not going to be the presidential nominee of the Republican Party. Yet it seems likely that he will outlast all his rivals but for Romney, and that he will have a substantial bloc of delegates at...
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  • A Warring Visionary
    March 2012

    A Warring Visionary

    British scholar Timothy Stanley has produced the first significant biography of Patrick J. Buchanan, describing his life from his boyhood in Washington, D.C., up to the present. Stanley’s book is written in a breezy, informal manner—Buchanan...
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  • Inventing the European Union
    March 2012

    Inventing the European Union

    The tendency to try to create “European” cultural commonalities as a substitute for the old, Christian ones is also not new: The notion of a “European” community was hugely appealing to the philosophes.
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  • Iraq: Yesterday and Tomorrow
    February 2012

    Iraq: Yesterday and Tomorrow

    Stenton’s article described the British experience in Mesopotamia almost a century ago when, during World War I, British forces wrenched what is now Iraq away from the collapsing Ottoman Empire.
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  • Fall of a Titan
    February 2012

    Fall of a Titan

    The current work exhibits the most famous paleoconservative’s trademark word-crafting verve, encyclopedic knowledge of history and politics, and emotional power.
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  • Romney: Making the World Safe for Plutocracy
    February 2012

    Romney: Making the World Safe for Plutocracy

    Like his father, Mitt was a liberal governor, in his case imposing on Bay Staters his RomneyCare socialized-medicine scheme. It has cast a shadow over the conservative persona he’s adopted in his two presidential campaigns.
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  • An Action Program
    February 2012

    An Action Program

    What is a populist? This much used (and abused) term has gone through several American incarnations.
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  • Once and Future Communists
    December 2011

    Once and Future Communists

    In September 2009, anticommunists all across the ex-Soviet bloc, but especially in Bulgaria, were shocked to learn of the election of a former high-ranking communist bureaucrat, Bulgarian diplomat Irina Bokova (a former colleague of mine), as...
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  • Just Say No to the Kool-Aid
    December 2011

    Just Say No to the Kool-Aid

    Much of Rand Paul’s book focuses on how he overcame enormous odds in 2010 to win—first, the Republican nomination for the U.S. Senate against an establishment favorite, and then in defeating a popular Democratic candidate in the general election.
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  • The Other America
    December 2011

    The Other America

    Violence, coarseness, crises of immigration, collapses of distinctions—these phenomena sound American and raise a question: If our country is so different from Britain, then how is it that we seem to have wound up in such a similarly precarious...
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  • Pragmatic Destruction
    December 2011

    Pragmatic Destruction

    Greek writers, and writers coming after them for the next 2,000 years, attributed the short life and violent end of democratic governments to democracy’s infallible tendency toward demagoguery and the dispossession of the wealthy and educated by...
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  • Devil's Mama
    December 2011

    Devil's Mama

    The rockets that, according to Khru­sh­­chev, were coming off his production line “like sausages” ran on kerosene and liquid oxygen. So did Soviet foreign policy.
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  • A New Church and a New Country
    December 2011

    A New Church and a New Country

    Archbishop José Gomez of Los Angeles tirelessly advocates for illegal aliens. A native of Mexico, he has an ardent love of his homeland and his people. He testifies frequently on Capitol Hill in favor of various amnesty-related issues, always...
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  • Immoral Triumphs
    December 2011

    Immoral Triumphs

    Clyde Wilson once remarked that, if one were to distill multiculturalism to its essence, one would be left with nothing at all. As he put it, multiculturalism means many fashions, mutable and discardable, but no culture.
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  • Of Candidates and Clowns
    December 2011

    Of Candidates and Clowns

    George Clooney’s film The Ides of March is a behind-the-scenes look at a presidential primary race in contemporary Ohio. The behavior of the candidates and their rabid retinues make American politics look as sporting as feeding time at...
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  • Russian Reset in Peril
    December 2011

    Russian Reset in Peril

    For all its many faults, the Obama administration has scored one notable success: It has done significantly better than its recent Republican and Democratic predecessors in normalizing relations with Russia.
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  • Gardasil Rick
    December 2011

    Gardasil Rick

    Texas Gov. Rick Perry enjoyed one month as the heartthrob of the Republican Party. He announced his presidential bid on August 13, overshadowing Rep. Michele Bachmann’s narrow victory over Rep. Ron Paul in the Ames Straw Poll.
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  • The Aphid on the Machine
    November 2011

    The Aphid on the Machine

    The current labor situation, which has been developing over the past 20 years, has now reached to the professional classes as well. Print journalists, for instance, are being thrown out of work as newspapers and magazines close, and compelled to...
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  • Putin Reset
    November 2011

    Putin Reset

    Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin will return to the Kremlin as president in 2012, ending speculation on the fate of the “national leader” and of the “tandem” he had formed with current President Dmitri Medvedev.
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  • Statehood Bid
    November 2011

    Statehood Bid

    Much of the international politics of the 20th century revolved around the drive for national self-determination, such as that of the Serbs in the Balkans, setting in motion the crises that led to the Great War.
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  • A Kinder, Gentler Amnesty
    November 2011

    A Kinder, Gentler Amnesty

    In an August 18 letter to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and 21 other Democratic senators, Napolitano acknowledged that removing people from the country simply for being illegal immigrants was no longer an “enforcement priority” of the Obama...
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  • Am I a Threat to National Security?
    November 2011

    Am I a Threat to National Security?

    When I first saw the memo from the FBI’s counterterrorism center in Newark, declaring that I’m “a threat to National Security,” not to mention an “agent of a foreign power,” I was incredulous. These can’t be real FBI documents, I thought to...
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  • The Capitalist Nonesuch
    October 2011

    The Capitalist Nonesuch

    When the first of the truly modern “modern politicians” straddled the front page, even the meliorism junkies of the New York Times deemed it proper to lament the creature’s arrival and to bemoan its lack of substance. But the...
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  • Ron Paul, Now and Then
    October 2011

    Ron Paul, Now and Then

    People don’t usually get more radical as they get older; it’s almost always the reverse. And the successful politicians were never radical to begin with. The one exception to this