• <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    May 26, 2020

    What the Editors Are Reading

    Robert Louis Stevenson’s novella of split personality, the Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886), and The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers (1987) by Paul Kennedy
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    May 26, 2020

    Books in Brief

    The Art of Statistics, by David Spiegelhalter (Basic Books; 448 pp., $32.00). Uncanny Valley: A Memoir, by Anna Wiener (MCD; 288 pp., $27.00).
  • Praying Alone
    Column
    May 26, 2020

    Praying Alone

    When Americans look back on 2020, the year of the virus, they will see multiple transformations. I fear that some of the most sweeping changes will come in the realm of religion, marking a grim turning point in the story of American faith.
  • Monocultural Resilience
    Column
    May 26, 2020

    Monocultural Resilience

    At the end of the ongoing global melodrama’s first quarter, it seems reasonable to predict that this will be a two-act play with the final curtain coming down in July. It will end as a tragedy, not because the outcome was preordained…
  • Go Big or Go Home
    Column
    May 26, 2020

    Go Big or Go Home

    Before the coronavirus slammed into the United States in a way that few foresaw, it seemed Donald Trump was heading to reelection based on a record of genuine, though modest, accomplishments.
  • The Pandemic of Godlessness
    Column
    May 26, 2020

    The Pandemic of Godlessness

    It is a universally acknowledged truth that when epidemics strike, men and women turn to God.
  • Virginia's Creeping Authoritarianism
    Views
    May 26, 2020

    Virginia's Creeping Authoritarianism

    Even before the nationwide government crackdown in the wake of the COVID-19 virus, the unprecedented reaction of Virginia’s government against civilian protestors showcased the potential for authoritarianism to rear its head in America…
  • The Theatrical Tradition of Dorothy Sayers
    Society & Culture
    May 26, 2020

    The Theatrical Tradition of Dorothy Sayers

    In 1941, bestselling novelist Dorothy L. Sayers (1893-1957) ignited a religious controversy that reverberated throughout England. Ironically, Sayers was motivated not by a defiance of tradition but by an intense desire to preserve it.
  • An Easter Reflection: The Mystery of Goodness
    Correspondence
    May 26, 2020

    An Easter Reflection: The Mystery of Goodness

    The sun broke through the thin, whispery clouds, and its reflection in a pool of water collected from the previous night’s rain caught my eye. Suddenly the day was bright and the morning as clear and joyful as hope itself. Resurrection Day.
  • Hankering Hereafter
    Column
    May 26, 2020

    Hankering Hereafter

    The Invisible Man (2020) • Seven Stages to Achieve Eternal Bliss (2018) • Panic in the Streets (1950)
  • Plague Literature: The Threshing Floor
    Society & Culture
    May 26, 2020

    Plague Literature: The Threshing Floor

    Since plague is one of those natural disasters whose origin cannot be assigned to human agency, it can pose seemingly insoluble moral problems…Does God in fact directly will suffering, or does he merely permit it?
  • A Skeptic on the Road of Saints
    Reviews
    May 26, 2020

    A Skeptic on the Road of Saints

    Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Timothy Egan’s latest book chronicles his pilgrimage along the Via Francigena.
  • The Mind Behind Big Brother
    Reviews
    May 26, 2020

    The Mind Behind Big Brother

    Few works in literature are as terrifying as 1984, that look into the future written by George Orwell and published in 1949. British scholar Dorian Lynskey unravels the novel’s themes, inspirations, and intentions in his latest book.
  • Empire States of Mind
    Reviews
    May 26, 2020

    Empire States of Mind

    Although this relatively short book is closer to an extended, episodic essay than to the comprehensive history of the British Empire implied by the title, it is an excellent example of the author’s style. Jeremy Black takes a broad view…
  • Remembering the Southern Agrarians
    Remembering the Right
    May 26, 2020

    Remembering the Southern Agrarians

    In 1920 a group of writers gathered in Nashville for bi-weekly sessions of reading and dissecting each other’s prose and poetry. The group, who defended the traditional Southern way of life, became known as the Southern Agrarians.
  • Remembering Whittaker Chambers
    Remembering the Right
    May 26, 2020

    Remembering Whittaker Chambers

    At first glance, the personal history of Whittaker Chambers does not suggest a conservative frame of mind.
  • What Price Victory—in the Coronavirus War?
    Blog
    April 14, 2020

    What Price Victory—in the Coronavirus War?

    The same day the number of U.S. dead from the coronavirus disease hit the 15,000 mark, we also crossed the 15 million mark on the number of Americans we threw out of work to slow its spread and "bend the curve." For each American lost to the...
  • Trump's Presidency Hangs on One Decision
    Blog
    April 10, 2020

    Trump's Presidency Hangs on One Decision

    Six weeks ago, Trump was boasting, and justifiably so, of having the greatest economy of any president in recent memory. Now, the possibility exists that he could go into the fall election with the worst economy since Hoover and the Great...
  • The Old Left Wasn't Very Leftist
    Blog
    April 08, 2020

    The Old Left Wasn't Very Leftist

    It would be impossible to imagine any shared moral ground between the left that existed in the 1930s and what today presents itself as their intellectual descendants.
  • Kissinger's Call for a New World Order
    Blog
    April 07, 2020

    Kissinger's Call for a New World Order

    Kissinger has declared that it is now an imperative that the world's leaders, even as they deal with the raging pandemic, begin to make the "transition to the post-coronavirus order."
  • In This Number
    In This Number
    April 01, 2020

    In This Number

    A note from the publisher introducing the April/May 2020 Chronicles.
  • Family Finances
    Column
    April 01, 2020

    Family Finances

    Parasite may be both the most amusing and the most horrifying movie of the year. That is, if you can get past its inept attempt at making a political statement.
  • What Has COVID-19 Done to Our Money?
    Editorials
    April 01, 2020

    What Has COVID-19 Done to Our Money?

    While left and right squabble over the right approach to COVID-19, the Fed prints the U.S. dollar into oblivion.
  • The Unclubbable
    Editorials
    April 01, 2020

    The Unclubbable

    The late Joe Sobran used to refer to liberal high society as "the hive.” What Joe was highlighting were certain qualities that he associated with the fashionable left, e.g., extreme clannishness, the exclusion of those who deviated from...
  • Books in Brief
    Reviews
    April 01, 2020

    Books in Brief

    John DeJak reviews Václav Benda's The Long Night of the Watchman
  • What the Editors Are Reading
    Reviews
    April 01, 2020

    What the Editors Are Reading

    Reviews of Nassim Nicholas Taleb's Antifragile and Diego Gambetta's The Sicilian Mafia
  • Polemics & Exchanges
    Polemics & Exchanges
    April 01, 2020

    Polemics & Exchanges

    Prof. Brion McClanahan answers a critic of his "Reinventing Reconstruction" article in the February number
  • #MeToo for Me, But Not for Thee
    Column
    April 01, 2020

    #MeToo for Me, But Not for Thee

    Human nature does not change, at least not where the Hollywood types who hung around with Harvey Weinstein are concerned. Hypocrisy, not talent, is the number one commodity in Tinseltown.
  • Epidemic for the Record Books
    Column
    April 01, 2020

    Epidemic for the Record Books

    As the hysterical coronavirus overreaction crashes our economy, I can’t help but think of the Spanish flu, which took some 675,000 American lives in 1918 and 1919.
  • The Geopolitics of Coronavirus
    Column
    April 01, 2020

    The Geopolitics of Coronavirus

    The contours of COVD-19's geopolitical impact are becoming apparent in the rapidly changing patterns of mental mapping, political decision-making, and economic flows in the three panregions that matter in today’s world: Asia-Pacific, Europe, and...
  • Letter from Twickenham: In Deepest Remainland
    Correspondence
    April 01, 2020

    Letter from Twickenham: In Deepest Remainland

    One would be hard pressed to find a more pleasant London neighborhood than the leafy suburb of Twickenham, where this author resides. Situated on the Thames River and immersed in history, Twickenham was for years a bastion of conservatism. In the...
  • Faux Originalism
    Society & Culture
    April 01, 2020

    Faux Originalism

    Is Antonin Scalia’s originalism—indeed, constitutional self-government itself—passé? The eternal temptation to read one’s own values into the Constitution beguiles even religious conservatives espousing natural law.
  • Loveline: Stealth Conservative Talk Radio
    Society & Culture
    April 01, 2020

    Loveline: Stealth Conservative Talk Radio

    Some conservative converts got there by reading National Review and Whittaker Chambers’ Witness. Others watched leftist comrades become too radical, or saw the Soviet Union collapse, or recoiled at political correctness. The Loveline caller made a di
  • Hitler vs. the Anglo-Americans
    Reviews
    April 01, 2020

    Hitler vs. the Anglo-Americans

    On April 20, Adolf Hitler turns 131. Ten days later comes the 75th anniversary of his earthly demise in the ruins of Berlin, but he is still our contemporary par excellence. He continues to haunt and fascinate. Hitler’s countenance, his very...
  • Fatal Amendments
    Reviews
    April 01, 2020

    Fatal Amendments

    Enthusiastic defenders of the First and Second Amendments to the Constitution are fundamentalist cultists—and women and minorities are their victims. At least, that is the thesis of University of Miami law professor Mary Anne Franks’ new book,...
  • Traditionalism Redux
    Reviews
    April 01, 2020

    Traditionalism Redux

    War for Eternity strives to show that many modern national conservative and populist movements are paradoxically informed by the arcane intellectual current known as traditionalism.
  • Remembering Willmoore Kendall
    Remembering the Right
    April 01, 2020

    Remembering Willmoore Kendall

    Among the 20th-century conservative movement’s legendary leaders, Willmoore Kendall (1909-1967) stands out as the one who most effectively offered a grounding in a specifically American philosophy. There is also a timeliness in this remarkable...
  • Remembering William F. Buckley, Jr.
    Remembering the Right
    April 01, 2020

    Remembering William F. Buckley, Jr.

    Two years after the death of the man whom one of his biographers, John Judis, dubbed the patron saint of modern conservatism, Encounter Books brought out a splendidly packaged omnibus volume of his columns and essays, entitled Athwart History:...
  • Coins of the Realm
    Views
    April 01, 2020

    Coins of the Realm

    It is hard for us to imagine that ordinary people used to care about the design of public objects: coins, dollars, bridges, court houses, town halls, churches, schools, and even factories.... We need new coins to reflect our modern reality.
  • Is the Pandemic Killing Biden's Bid?
    Blog
    March 31, 2020

    Is the Pandemic Killing Biden's Bid?

    Trump's presidency will stand or fall on the resolution of the coronavirus crisis and how Trump is perceived as having led us in that battle.
  • The Politics of the Coronavirus
    Blog
    March 30, 2020

    The Politics of the Coronavirus

    In the United States, political biases have also been evident in responses to the virus. Republicans are stressing the dire economic consequences of the shutdown and warn about doing irreparable destruction to our material well-being.
  • The Nation-State Is Back
    Blog
    March 28, 2020

    The Nation-State Is Back

    Neoliberal globalization in its post-Cold War form has been dealt a mortal blow by COVID-19, which is a good thing. The architecture of global economic and political governance developed over the past three decades is collapsing before our eyes.
  • Can This Pandemic Usher in a New Era?
    Blog
    March 27, 2020

    Can This Pandemic Usher in a New Era?

    Nations seem to be recognizing and responding to the grim new geostrategic reality of March 2020: The pandemic is the real enemy of us all, and while we fight it, each in his own national corner, we are in this together.
  • COVID-19 in the Light of History
    Blog
    March 26, 2020

    COVID-19 in the Light of History

    The pandemic’s future course and cost cannot be predicted. It does appear certain, however, that the world is experiencing changes which are likely irreversible. The contours of its geopolitical impact are becoming apparent in the rapidly...
  • Must We Kill the Economy To Kill the Virus?
    Blog
    March 24, 2020

    Must We Kill the Economy To Kill the Virus?

    President Trump is said to be privately expressing a deepening concern at the damage the coronavirus shutdown is doing to the U.S. economy and debating whether it can be safely reopened. Though castigated for his remark, Trump has a point.
  • Are Americans All-In for a Long Coronavirus War?
    Blog
    March 20, 2020

    Are Americans All-In for a Long Coronavirus War?

    Will Americans suffer in social isolation, inside their own homes for months, while a state-induced Great Depression washes over the land?
  • What Globalism Has Wrought
    Blog
    March 19, 2020

    What Globalism Has Wrought

    No matter whether one believes the actual threat has been overstated, we can only hope that the troubles unleashed by the fear of the coronavirus will lead to a serious re-evaluation of the entire globalist project, as well as to serious...
  • The World's Values
    Column
    March 01, 2020

    The World's Values

    1917 • La Grande Illusion (1937) • Paths of Glory (1957) • Uncut Gems

    Sam Mendes’ new film, 1917, is a rigorous examination of what it was like to be a low-ranking officer in the Great War. The film follows—literally, with a...
  • The American Muse
    Reviews
    March 01, 2020

    The American Muse

    For almost as long as there have been literary works, there have been literary canons, largely established by bookish pedants who do, indeed, “quarrel unceasingly.” The quarreling began early in the third century B.C. and continues today. The...
  • How Communism Saved the Eastern Bloc from Cultural Marxism
    Society & Culture
    March 01, 2020

    How Communism Saved the Eastern Bloc from Cultural Marxism

    Despite living under nearly a century of oppressive, conformist, Soviet-style Communism, Eastern Bloc nations have somehow maintained strong senses of cultural, religious, linguistic, and ethnic identities. What’s more, they arguably have...
  • Lighting Up History
    Reviews
    March 01, 2020

    Lighting Up History

    When it comes to social hierarchy, smokers are only a few notches above pedophiles. Yes, smokers are bad, they smell terrible, and they cost us money—and everyone knows it. One would expect the “smokers bad” message to saturate The Cigarette....
  • The Knack of the Non-Deal
    Column
    March 01, 2020

    The Knack of the Non-Deal

    An Arab-Israeli peace agreement is like a moderate Syrian rebel or rational leftist: It is possible to visualize, but producing one is daunting. Every attempt has failed. President Donald Trump’s “Peace to Prosperity” plan will be no...
  • Sir Roger Scruton: Britain's Culture Warrior
    In Memoriam
    March 01, 2020

    Sir Roger Scruton: Britain's Culture Warrior

    I first heard Roger Scruton speak at the 1993 regional Philadelphia Society meeting in Dearborn, Michigan, organized to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Russell Kirk’s The Conservative Mind. Scruton spoke on the topic of “The Conservative Mind...
  • Brexit Got Done, Now Get Over It
    Column
    March 01, 2020

    Brexit Got Done, Now Get Over It

    The great 2016 vote-undoing project seems at long last to have been abandoned on both sides of the Atlantic. In Washington, President Trump’s impeachment fizzled out—a strange and pathetic affair however you look at it. Everyone is looking past...
  • Vestigial Reds
    Editorials
    March 01, 2020

    Vestigial Reds

    Diana West should be a familiar name to anyone who has studied the operation of the American Communist movement. Two of her books, America Betrayed: The Secret Assault on our Nation’s Character (2013) and The Red Thread (2019) examine the...
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    March 01, 2020

    Books in Brief

    Journalist Tyler O’Neil of PJ Media has been busy. From roughly around the time of the Charlottesville racial conflagration in 2017 to the filling of the inkwells that were used to print this book, O’Neil has covered various aspects of the...
  • The Myth of Nazi Inevitability
    Views
    March 01, 2020

    The Myth of Nazi Inevitability

    Lately, I’ve been studying a segment of German history about which I knew little as compared with the period before World War I or the great German cultural awakening between 1770 and 1820, sometimes characterized as die Goethezeit. Germany’s...
  • Tariffs Work
    Column
    March 01, 2020

    Tariffs Work

    For decades, American political discourse has largely operated within the spectrum of opinions voiced by the editorial pages of The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Wall Street Journal. Opinions not embraced by one of these newspapers...
  • Dictatorship of the Deranged
    Reviews
    March 01, 2020

    Dictatorship of the Deranged

    A long time ago, I happened upon a cartoon in some publication or other. A single frame—in the vein of Gary Larson—depicted thousands of sheep rushing headlong off a cliff. In the middle of this great multitude, one particular sheep moved in the...
  • Meet the Markles
    Column
    March 01, 2020

    Meet the Markles

    I never thought I’d get back to this silly subject for Chronicles ever again, but the Markles—as I now refer to them—have a way of getting our attention, and embarrassing Al Capone in the process. As the Feds were closing in on him, Al was told...
  • And a Little Child Shall Mislead Them
    Column
    March 01, 2020

    And a Little Child Shall Mislead Them

    Swedish activist Greta Thunberg has become a vastly influential force in the discussion of global climate change. Even so, policy makers are reluctant to challenge her because her global reputation verges on the hagiographic. Conservative...
  • Bad Intel
    Views
    March 01, 2020

    Bad Intel

    A pair of recent news items unintentionally demonstrated the ways the Intelligence Community is a primary source of our confused foreign policy in the Middle East, while also undermining President Trump here at home.
  • <em>First Things</em> First
    Editorials
    March 01, 2020

    First Things First

    After people gather into groups they formulate their own founding myths. The veracity of these stories is of secondary importance to their ability to tie people to a sense of noble purpose, shared sacrifice, and confidence that their activities...
  • Remembering H. L. Mencken
    Remembering the Right
    March 01, 2020

    Remembering H. L. Mencken

    H.L. Mencken (1880-1956) may no longer seem relevant, but that is not his fault. Mencken was a well-read bon vivant with a taste for Teutonic philosophy and a fidelity to what he understood as truth. He was also a brilliant satirist, a longtime...
  • White Man's Soul Music
    Correspondence
    March 01, 2020

    White Man's Soul Music

    Johnny Cash’s At Folsom Prison was the first album I ever had of my own, a Christmas gift from my parents. I listened to that album over and over on the stereo my parents had given me that year, sprawled out on the floor of the living room of the...
  • Historical Revisionism on the Right
    Society & Culture
    March 01, 2020

    Historical Revisionism on the Right

    Nietzsche writes in the concluding section of Twilight of the Idols, “One does not learn from the Greeks—their way is too alien, and also too fluid, to have an imperative effect, a ‘classical’ effect.” The divide between Greek antiquity and...
  • Singin' the Publishing Blues
    Column
    March 01, 2020

    Singin' the Publishing Blues

    I like a traveling circus. The American Historical Association’s annual conference periodically sets up its tent at the New York Hilton. Since I live nearby, I subject myself to its clown car of characters every half decade. But this year, I saw...
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    March 01, 2020

    What the Editors Are Reading

    Perhaps the greatest American autobiography in both the quality of its writing and the import of its content is Whittaker Chambers’ Witness (1952). Sadly, it’s also one of the most neglected by the country’s leftist-dominated intelligentsia.
  • The Great Debate: Lincoln's Legacy
    Society & Culture
    January 30, 2020

    The Great Debate: Lincoln's Legacy

    The year 1975, for those of us old enough to remember, was a calm and quiet time in the United States. The Vietnam War and Watergate were both over, the riots and protests had ceased, and everybody liked our presiding nonpartisan president, who...
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    January 30, 2020

    Books in Brief

    End of an Era: How China’s Authoritarian Revival Is Undermining Its Rise, by Carl Minzner
    and
    Growth: From Microorganisms to Megacities, by Vaclav Smil
  • Jackson and the American Indians
    Column
    January 30, 2020

    Jackson and the American Indians

    Everyone knows that Andrew Jackson wanted American Indians annihilated, defied the Supreme Court in a famous challenge to Chief Justice John Marshall, and forcibly removed the Five Civilized Tribes of the Southeast to lands west of the...
  • The Perils of Revisionism
    Column
    January 30, 2020

    The Perils of Revisionism

    The Irishman • Raging Bull • Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker •

    Martin Scorsese’s The Irishman has been hailed in many quarters as a triumph, a return to the early movies of his career that made his reputation as the...

  • Apologizing for the Bother
    Reviews
    January 30, 2020

    Apologizing for the Bother

    “It’s a small, white, scored oval tablet.” A little pill stands between Florent-Claude Labrouste and his planned defenestration. It offers only a temporary reprieve from the meaninglessness of life. As the narrator of Michel Houellebecq’s latest...
  • Remembering Richard Weaver
    Remembering the Right
    January 30, 2020

    Remembering Richard Weaver

    Native Southerner and traditionalist conservative, Richard Weaver (1910-1963) was a unique figure in the rise of the modern American right. Weaver, a longtime professor at the University of Chicago, was an historian, literary critic, and...
  • The Real White Negro
    Society & Culture
    January 30, 2020

    The Real White Negro

    There were many wannabe Lucifers in mid-century America, from Saul Alinsky to Herbert Marcuse, but nobody combined sulfur with venom, hate with dead-on aim, the way Norman Mailer did. East Coast revolutionary to the core, Mailer—who once nearly...
  • Deconstructing the 1619 Project
    Views
    January 30, 2020

    Deconstructing the 1619 Project

    Several years ago, I purchased a used copy of Robert Fogel and Stanley Engerman’s Time on the Cross: The Economics of American Negro Slavery (1974), one of the five most important books on American slavery that have appeared in the last 50 years....
  • Nationalism for the Lukewarm
    Reviews
    January 30, 2020

    Nationalism for the Lukewarm

    It seems that Rich Lowry has taken time off from castigating Donald Trump and calling for the prompt removal of Confederate memorial monuments to compose an entire book making “the case for nationalism.” A media launch was provided by Fox News’s...
  • Afghan Disinformation
    Column
    January 30, 2020

    Afghan Disinformation

    During the Second World War the German High Command issued regular bulletins about the situation on various fronts. They had a triumphalist tone in 1940, when France fell, and in 1941, when it looked like the Red Army would collapse, but the core...
  • A New Right Arises in Poland
    Correspondence
    January 30, 2020

    A New Right Arises in Poland

    The year 2019 was an eventful one in Polish politics. Out of a boring and meaningless dispute between two wings of Polish liberalism, there arose a new political force determined to shake up Poland’s political culture. Eleven MPs from the new...
  • Hot Air Raids
    Column
    January 30, 2020

    Hot Air Raids

    Global warming is still a “maybe,” but in the Swiss Alps the visual evidence is undeniable. The glacier I used to ski on has disappeared, and man-made snow is pumped out daily in its place. The once-small alpine village from where I write this...
  • The Reinvention of Reconstruction
    Society & Culture
    January 30, 2020

    The Reinvention of Reconstruction

    American conservatives have rightly viewed the post-Civil War Reconstruction period as a tragic era rife with corruption, scandal, mismanagement, and unconstitutional uses of power at both the state and federal level. Unfortunately, many have...
  • Remembering Albert Jay Nock
    Remembering the Right
    January 30, 2020

    Remembering Albert Jay Nock

    As a conservative “anarchist” and non-interventionist with anti-vocational views on education, Albert Jay Nock (1870-1945) can seem paradoxical. His influence was lasting and he took unconventional stances on many topics. He viewed conservatism...
  • It's Not Okay to Be White
    Editorials
    January 30, 2020

    It's Not Okay to Be White

    The left now roundly denounces anyone to the right of Jeb Bush as a “white nationalist,” which it appears is now being equated with “white supremacist,” with the apparently immortal Adolph Hitler acting as the once-and-future ringleader of a...
  • Culture and Peoples
    Editorials
    January 30, 2020

    Culture and Peoples

    In a widely noted commentary on the achievements and failures of Sam Francis in the October issue of First Things, author Matthew Rose offers this conclusion: Francis claimed that he sought only to defend Western culture. It is impossible to...
  • Dabney's Blind Spot
    Polemics & Exchanges
    January 30, 2020

    Dabney's Blind Spot

    I read with interest the article by Zachary Garris on Robert Lewis Dabney (“Remembering R. L. Dabney,” December 2019). Having myself graduated from Hampden-Sydney College, where he taught, and being Presbyterian, I have had some interest in his...
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    January 30, 2020

    What the Editors Are Reading

    Evelyn Waugh wrote Brideshead Revisited (1945) while on a six-month leave from the British Army during World War II. It proved a hit with the public, but the critics who had praised Waugh’s earlier satirical novels were less impressed, objecting...
  • Self-Sufficient Faction
    Polemics & Exchanges
    January 30, 2020

    Self-Sufficient Faction

    I much enjoyed Prof. Gottfried’s response in the January issue, “Was Civil Rights Right?”, in which he wrote, “Although I am happy that racial segregation has ended, I am far less pleased with other changes that have come about because of social...
  • Outrage and Censorship
    Column
    December 01, 2019

    Outrage and Censorship

    I began my journalistic career under strict censorship. It was imposed on the press and media by the Greek colonels who had seized power in a bloodless coup in Athens on April 21, 1967. Censorship, however, suited me fine. That’s because I was an...
  • Remembering Robert Nisbet
    Remembering the Right
    December 01, 2019

    Remembering Robert Nisbet

    It is hard to imagine anyone today having a career like Robert Nisbet’s: professor at Berkeley, Arizona, and Columbia; dean and vice-chancellor at the University of California, Riverside; author of widely used sociology textbooks; and co-founder,...
  • Trail Life: A Christian Answer to the Boy Scouts
    Society & Culture
    December 01, 2019

    Trail Life: A Christian Answer to the Boy Scouts

    When Boy Scouts of America (BSA) announced their decision to welcome and validate openly homosexual boys six years ago, Cub Scout mom Theresa Waning saw the writing on the wall. Shortly after BSA’s announcement, the church chartering her son’s...
  • Remembering the Twenty-Teens
    Column
    December 01, 2019

    Remembering the Twenty-Teens

    Decades provide a useful, if not infallible, structure for organizing and understanding our historical experience. However frayed and disputed their limits, terms like “the twenties,” or “the eighties” each conjure their particular images and...
  • Purging the Bureaucrats
    Column
    December 01, 2019

    Purging the Bureaucrats

    In his 1968 essay “Bureaucracy and Policy Making,” Dr. Henry Kissinger argued that there was no rationality or consistency in American foreign policymaking. “[A]s the bureaucracy becomes large and complex,” he wrote, “more time is devoted to...
  • Was Civil Rights Right?
    Polemics & Exchanges
    December 01, 2019

    Was Civil Rights Right?

    I read the editorial “What’s Paleo, and What’s Not” by Paul Gottfried (December 2019) with appreciation. It did raise some questions for me. He mentioned the controversial view of seeing continuity between the civil rights legislation of the...
  • A Louisiana Lesson
    Polemics & Exchanges
    December 01, 2019

    A Louisiana Lesson

    If an admiring reviewer’s main purpose is to inspire his reader to run out and buy the book he praises, Professor Randall Ivey has done that for me with his review of Louisiana Poets: A Literary Guide (“Chansons by the Bayou,” December 2019)....
  • Britain's New Reality
    Editorials
    December 01, 2019

    Britain's New Reality

    At 10 p.m. on Dec. 12, the TV screen flashes up a summary of British voting exit polls, showing a landslide victory for the Conservatives. The spectre of a Marxist government under Jeremy Corbyn vanishes, and Boris Johnson now rules the land. He...
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    December 01, 2019

    What the Editors Are Reading

    The Diary of a Country Priest (1936) by Georges Bernanos is as timely now as ever. It can be appreciated for its powerful Christian vision, its pertinence to today’s social illnesses, and its literary excellence, as shown in narrative technique,...
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    December 01, 2019

    Books in Brief

    Debunking Howard Zinn: Exposing the Fake History That Turned a Generation Against America, by Mary Grabar (Regnery; 327 pp., $29.99). Mary Grabar has performed an invaluable service by taking the time to dissect Howard Zinn’s polemical attack on...
  • An Austrian Frame of Mind
    Reviews
    December 01, 2019

    An Austrian Frame of Mind

    Professor Janek Wasserman, to his credit, is not a polemicist. His new book is indeed a leftist critique of the broad school of economic thought now colloquially referred to as “Austrian,” but it is not only that. It is also a lively and...
  • The Truth About Afghanistan
    Editorials
    December 01, 2019

    The Truth About Afghanistan

    If anyone hasn’t heard about it by now, “our” government has been lying about the lack of progress being made in the seemingly eternal war being fought in Afghanistan. In the 18 years of the longest war in U.S. history, more than $1 trillion has...
  • A Gutless Persuasion
    Editorials
    December 01, 2019

    A Gutless Persuasion

    On Nov. 18, the Rupert Murdoch-financed New York Post ran an opinion-piece by its star columnist, Karol Markowicz, on left-wing anti-Semitism. Like the rest of the Post editorial staff, Markowicz is upset that at least part of the Jewish left has...
  • The Unbearable Burden of Being
    Views
    December 01, 2019

    The Unbearable Burden of Being

    What has brought upon us the madness of the “transgender,” with all its sad denial of the beauty and particularity of male and female? To see the cause, we must diagnose the malady. It is boredom: an irritable impatience with the things that...
  • Remembering Eugene Genovese
    Remembering the Right
    December 01, 2019

    Remembering Eugene Genovese

    Eugene Genovese was one of the most influential and controversial historians of his generation. Whether Genovese ever self-identified as a conservative remains an intriguing question, without a simple answer. Few people knew him better than I did.
  • Is Seattle Dying?
    Correspondence
    December 01, 2019

    Is Seattle Dying?

    Not long ago, I found myself sitting one sunny Friday afternoon in the Unity Museum in Seattle, notebook in hand, as a group of fresh-faced college undergraduates participated in a debate over whether or not their city is dying. The general...
  • The Making of the Midwest
    Reviews
    December 01, 2019

    The Making of the Midwest

    David McCullough’s latest offering, The Pioneers, takes the reader into that little-known period of American history in which the intrepid veterans of the Revolutionary War set out to settle the territories on the banks of the Ohio River. It was...
  • Racing for Dominance
    Column
    December 01, 2019

    Racing for Dominance

    Jojo Rabbit • Ford v Ferrari • A Simple Plan

    Jojo Rabbit, written, directed, and produced by Taika Waititi, is a strange movie. It breaks the 74-year-old rule that Hitler must never be portrayed as playful, prankish, or in any other...

  • Simple Answers for Hateful Minds
    Column
    November 01, 2019

    Simple Answers for Hateful Minds

    When did Americans become the stormtroopers of irrational simplification? Not a moment passes when a tweet, Facebook post, or Instagram picture doesn’t rip through our amber waves of grain and drive a social justice warrior to attack the nearest...
  • Geostrategic Challenges in 2020
    Column
    November 01, 2019

    Geostrategic Challenges in 2020

    As we approach the last year of this century’s second decade, the United States is still the most powerful state in the world, safe from direct threats by foreign state actors. The “challenges” America faces in the year ahead are entirely...
  • Grim Foolishness
    Column
    November 01, 2019

    Grim Foolishness

    I’ve seen only two-and-a-half Quentin Tarantino films, which seems to me one more than enough. They’re silly, trashy, and singularly devoid of amusement. Why would I see another? But when his latest, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, received...
  • Remembering the Right
    Views
    November 01, 2019

    Remembering the Right

    The featured theme of this month’s magazine is focused on a particular task, namely retrieving conservativism and conservative thinkers from the past and explaining their continued relevance to the present. The current conservative movement, as a...
  • The Hijacking of Nationalist Conservativism
    Views
    November 01, 2019

    The Hijacking of Nationalist Conservativism

    The 2016 election planted a nationalistic, populist battle standard reminiscent of the one that the pitchfork-wielding legions of the Old Right had once marched beneath. Now it appears at risk of being diluted and neutralized, as populist...
  • Unending Journeys
    Reviews
    November 01, 2019

    Unending Journeys

    Few subjects arouse such atavistic emotions as migration—whether the arrivals come as conquerors or as kin, fleeing ordeals or seeking opportunities. For incomers, migration can represent a dream, a rational choice, an urgent necessity, or a last...
  • Chansons by the Bayou
    Reviews
    November 01, 2019

    Chansons by the Bayou

    Louisiana being the jazz capital of the United States (and the world, for that matter), one easily forgets the other contributions she has made to American culture. Then one remembers Louisiana is Walker Percy’s adopted home and the setting of...
  • Dutch Euthanasia Case Serves as Harbinger
    Society & Culture
    November 01, 2019

    Dutch Euthanasia Case Serves as Harbinger

    In 2002 the Netherlands became the first country in the world to legalize euthanasia, formalizing what had been tolerated by the government for several decades prior. Today, however, the Dutch practice of euthanasia is arguably less settled...
  • Zombie Theology
    Society & Culture
    November 01, 2019

    Zombie Theology

    I teach theology courses at a non-denominational, evangelical Christian high school outside of Fort Worth, Texas. We study the history of the Christian faith, work our way chapter and verse through at least 15 books of the Bible over the span of...
  • Between Raising Hell and Amazing Grace
    Society & Culture
    November 01, 2019

    Between Raising Hell and Amazing Grace

    I have heard the following remark, or something similar, made about country music on numerous occasions in my life: “You know, it’s kind of hard to take a guy seriously when he sings about loving Jesus one minute and drinking and cheating the next.”
  • What's Paleo, and What's Not
    Editorials
    November 01, 2019

    What's Paleo, and What's Not

    In a recent Townhall commentary, the young author Michael Malarkey marvels over “the resurgence of refined paleoconservatism.” Supposedly Donald Trump has absorbed quintessential paleoconservative positions and is now putting them into practice....
  • The Groyper Rebellion
    Editorials
    November 01, 2019

    The Groyper Rebellion

    In late October, Turning Point USA (TPUSA) founder Charlie Kirk took the stage at Ohio State University prepared to “own the libs,” as he and other establishment conservative speakers had been doing profitably on college campuses for the last two...
  • Remembering Murray Rothbard
    Views
    November 01, 2019

    Remembering Murray Rothbard

    Murray Rothbard, the principal founder of post-World War II American libertarianism, died 24 years ago. Lew Rockwell, one of Rothbard’s closest friends and the founder of the Mises Institute and LewRockwell.com, offers this description of his...
  • Remembering M. E. Bradford
    Views
    November 01, 2019

    Remembering M. E. Bradford

    Anyone who met M. E. Bradford was unlikely to forget him. There was his imposing bulk and his Stetson cowboy hat, but that was just the trimming. This Oklahoman, long a fixture at the University of Dallas, radiated vast erudition, lightly worn...
  • Remembering R. L. Dabney
    Views
    November 01, 2019

    Remembering R. L. Dabney

    Robert Lewis Dabney was an American theologian and seminary professor. He was also a philosopher who wrote extensively on cultural and political issues of the second half of the 19th century. In our own day, when there is much confusion over what...
  • To Regulate, or Not to Regulate?
    Reviews
    November 01, 2019

    To Regulate, or Not to Regulate?

    One vocal U.S. political tribe argues vociferously that capitalism is the source of all economic problems. Another tends to ignore that the current economy is not working for all Americans. French economist Thomas Philippon’s work should interest...
  • In Georgia, a Reminder of a Halcyon West
    Correspondence
    November 01, 2019

    In Georgia, a Reminder of a Halcyon West

    Even in the beginnings of winter, Georgia’s capitol Tbilisi emits a warmth. One should expect this from a city known for its many hot springs, but the warmth experienced goes much beyond the sulfur baths popular with tourists and locals alike....
  • A Giant Beset by Pygmies
    Column
    November 01, 2019

    A Giant Beset by Pygmies

    Most newspaper and magazine articles are forgotten not long after they appear. Does anyone read the 25-year-old columns of Norman Podhoretz, William F. Buckley, or Richard John Neuhaus for insight into current events? It therefore tells us...
  • George O'Brien: American Star
    Column
    November 01, 2019

    George O'Brien: American Star

    WWI veteran George O’Brien became a star in Hollywood with his breakout performance in John Ford’s silent film epic, The Iron Horse. Handsome and built like the top athlete he was, O’Brien appeared in 11 more Ford movies and 85 films altogether,...
  • Time for a More Militant Church
    Column
    November 01, 2019

    Time for a More Militant Church

    The following was recently but ecstatically pronounced by the malignant, anti-white, anti-Christian, and anti-male New York Times: “Perhaps for the first time since the United States was established, a majority of young adults here do not...
  • An E Pluribus Reminder
    Polemics & Exchanges
    November 01, 2019

    An E Pluribus Reminder

    It is saddening to see so distinguished an authority as Professor Stephen Presser misquote important words from the Constitution as he does in his November article on impeachment. He writes that treason is “clearly defined” in the Constitution as...
  • The Failure of the Canadian Right
    Correspondence
    November 01, 2019

    The Failure of the Canadian Right

    The Canadian federal election in October confirmed a long-term, leftward trend in Canadian politics. Despite Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s blackface scandal, the Liberals retained power, winning a plurality of 157 out of 338 seats and 33.1...
  • Impeachment, Just and Unjust
    Views
    October 01, 2019

    Impeachment, Just and Unjust

    What exactly did the framers mean by putting in the Constitution Article II, Section 4? This is the section that reads, “The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for,...
  • The Spanish Civil War and the Battle for Western Civilization
    Views
    October 01, 2019

    The Spanish Civil War and the Battle for Western Civilization

    After a lengthy legal battle concluded in September, Spain’s Supreme Court gave its approval to the socialist government’s plans to exhume and remove the remains of General Francisco Franco from the Valley of the Fallen, where they have lain...
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    October 01, 2019

    Books in Brief

    Paul Gottfried on National Populism and the Revolt Against Liberal Democracy by Roger Eatwell and Matthew Goodwin. Peter Hammack on Prosperity: Better Business Makes the Greater Good by Colin Mayer.
  • Letter to the Bishop
    Society & Culture
    October 01, 2019

    Letter to the Bishop

    Your Excellency: A few years have passed since we corresponded. After my last letter to you, I’m afraid I took a wrong path, crashed and burned, and now stagger forward, burdened by more ordinary trespasses. But still a believer, grateful, as...
  • What Remains After the Wall's Fall
    Column
    October 01, 2019

    What Remains After the Wall's Fall

    Thirty years after the fall of the Berlin Wall it is not a matter of dispute that the removal of that evil edifice was a good thing. It should be equally uncontentious that its collapse was primarily the result of the Russians themselves trying...
  • Mayhem and Civility
    Column
    October 01, 2019

    Mayhem and Civility

    Joker, Downton Abbey, and The Conversation • There must be other films as ghastly as director Todd Phillips’ Joker, but I can’t think of any that come close to its sickness. I don’t say that lightly. This is a thoroughly immoral film, and a...
  • Twitter Princess
    Column
    October 01, 2019

    Twitter Princess

    The Republic is in crisis. America’s intellectual class is working to discredit our past. The media is waging war against the middle-class values of hard work, religion, and family. In order not to be outdone, Hollywood’s message is more...
  • Ruffled Feathers
    Polemics & Exchanges
    October 01, 2019

    Ruffled Feathers

    I’ll leave it for the birds to pick the salvageable bits out of Jason Michael Morgan’s vomitous screed (“Ride On, Proud Boys!” September 2019) and restrict myself to some much needed correction of this horrendously anti-cultural, anti-Christian,...
  • Clean Language
    Polemics & Exchanges
    October 01, 2019

    Clean Language

    Thank you for publishing “Boris’s Literary Language,” by Ralph Berry in the October issue. Mr. Berry’s fine contributions, always instructive, illustrate the careful use of English that he identifies in the discourse of Jacob Rees-Mogg.
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    October 01, 2019

    What the Editors Are Reading

    Paul Gottfried on Thérèse Desqueyroux by François Mauriac. Ralph Berry on The Great Deception: A Secret History of the European Union by Christopher Booker and Richard North.
  • <em>In This Number</em>
    In This Number
    October 01, 2019

    In This Number

    I write with bittersweet excitement to reveal the new interim editor in chief of Chronicles. As our readers know, Aaron Wolf was to become the editor in chief this year, but passed away suddenly on Easter Sunday. Aaron was an exceptional man and...
  • Think of the Children
    Reviews
    October 01, 2019

    Think of the Children

    It seems things don’t change much after all. Consider these recent hysterical comments. “There’s scientific consensus that the lives of children are going to be very difficult,” said Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, age 30. “And it does lead, I...
  • A City-State on a Hill
    Reviews
    October 01, 2019

    A City-State on a Hill

    Mark Peterson’s new book traces the development of Boston from its founding in 1630 to the end of the American Civil War. In large part the book is a biography of the city, but from the unique perspective of Boston as a city-state and a...
  • The War for America
    Reviews
    October 01, 2019

    The War for America

    In many ways the American Revolution was unavoidable. Given the struggle to control the resources and riches of these British colonies, armed conflict was an eventuality that could have been foreseen with a little imagination. Britain’s North...
  • Impure Politics
    Editorials
    October 01, 2019

    Impure Politics

    In criminal law, there are times when a crime has clearly been committed, but it’s not clear whether the perpetrator had criminal intent. The impeachment effort against Donald Trump is the opposite situation: a case where there is no high...
  • Ritual, Tragedy, and Restoration
    Reviews
    October 01, 2019

    Ritual, Tragedy, and Restoration

    The Deer Hunter received the Academy Award for best picture at the Oscars ceremony in 1979. The film was much criticized by some for its Russian roulette sequences, especially the alleged “racism” on display in the film’s depiction of the Viet...
  • Ohio Gets Nice on Crime
    Correspondence
    October 01, 2019

    Ohio Gets Nice on Crime

    In my new home of Ashland, Ohio, there is a sign that welcomes all comers to “The World Headquarters of Nice People.” It seemed to me as if the entire town conspired to make my move as pleasant as could be. This is “Midwestern Nice” in a...
  • Religious Discrimination, Real and Imagined
    Correspondence
    October 01, 2019

    Religious Discrimination, Real and Imagined

    As I was scrolling the news one August day, my attention was drawn to an article recounting the story of a woman wearing a niqab who was ejected from a bus in the Netherlands, a country that enacted a partial ban on the full veil. The prohibition...
  • NY Cops Retreat From the Heat
    Column
    September 01, 2019

    NY Cops Retreat From the Heat

    The English actor Beatrice Lillie had no inkling of 2019’s sweltering summer heat in 1931 when she debuted Noël Coward’s ditty “Mad Dogs and Englishmen” in the Broadway musical The Third Little Show. The...
  • American Ideas, Then and Now
    Column
    September 01, 2019

    American Ideas, Then and Now

    Ten years or so ago Stephen Fry, English polymath, writer, TV personality, stage and screen actor, and many other things, gave a Spectator-sponsored lecture at the prestigious Royal Geographical Society. His theme was appreciation for...
  • The Conservative of Convenience
    Reviews
    September 01, 2019

    The Conservative of Convenience

    In a Washington Post review of George F. Will’s The Conservative Sensibility, Catholic political thinker Patrick Deneen offers the following observation: This book is not so much a brief for conservatism as it is a learned and lengthy...
  • The Perpetual Club
    Reviews
    September 01, 2019

    The Perpetual Club

    Such were the deep currents of literary life in 18th-century England that a group of friends meeting weekly in a London tavern included men as monumental as Samuel Johnson, Edmund Burke, Adam Smith, and Edward Gibbon. Even those members who are...
  • Inky Eyes Into China's Mind
    Correspondence
    September 01, 2019

    Inky Eyes Into China's Mind

    The newspaper boxes can be found around Washington, D.C., ranging from Union Station near the Hill to Foggy Bottom in the vicinity of the State Department. Inside, the newspaper articles emphasize positive, even entrepreneurial themes: investment...
  • Amazon Fires Spark Global Hysteria
    Correspondence
    September 01, 2019

    Amazon Fires Spark Global Hysteria

    The afternoon of Monday, August 19, I was at home in my apartment in the city center of São Paulo. Glancing out the window, I noticed the sky was unusually dark. I figured it was about to rain, so I told my children we had to cancel our trip to...
  • Hope in Little Platoons
    Society & Culture
    September 01, 2019

    Hope in Little Platoons

    For 26 years, I taught hundreds of home-educated students, including my own children. My checkered teaching career also includes a semester in a university, two years at a prison, and two years in a public high school. During my last 15 years of...
  • Our Culture of Narcissism
    Views
    September 01, 2019

    Our Culture of Narcissism

    Most Chronicles readers will no doubt recall the sordid Jussie Smollett hoax, which played out over the course of almost three months early this year in a scenario that might have been scripted for reality TV. Given the media’s...
  • Rhythms of Civility
    Reviews
    September 01, 2019

    Rhythms of Civility

    In Meville’s great novel Moby Dick, Captain Ahab seeks news from Captain Gardiner, whose son has been lost after an encounter with the monstrous whale. Ahab’s refusal to help Gardiner find his boy is foreshadowed in Ahab’s behavior when...
  • Two Faces of Modern Catholicism
    Reviews
    September 01, 2019

    Two Faces of Modern Catholicism

    Much has been written about the modernization of the Catholic Church—especially the crucial years from 1870 to 1970. These histories have been written from a number of perspectives, each with different definitions of modernity. James Chappel,...
  • Boris's Literary Language
    Correspondence
    September 01, 2019

    Boris's Literary Language

    For the first time since Winston Churchill, Britain is governed by a master of language. There have been few such in Downing Street history; most of those who become prime minister have devoted their entire life-effort to climbing “the greasy...
  • Can the Greens Change Their Colors?
    Society & Culture
    September 01, 2019

    Can the Greens Change Their Colors?

    Greens often make conservatives and populists see red—or Reds. In 2004, Australian politician John Anderson called his country’s Greens “watermelons…green on the outside, and very, very, very red on the...

  • Time for an Immigration Pause
    Column
    September 01, 2019

    Time for an Immigration Pause

    The postwar American conservative movement had many factions, but most at least feigned to revere British statesman Edmund Burke. Those who read the movement’s books and magazines were told Burke abhorred radical change, and so should we. In...
  • Out of Afghanistan
    Column
    September 01, 2019

    Out of Afghanistan

    President Donald Trump on September 7 abruptly cancelled secret meetings with unnamed Taliban representatives and Afghan President Ashraf Ghani. Citing a deadly bombing in Kabul a few days earlier, Trump also said he was cancelling the talks with...
  • Which Terrorism?
    Column
    September 01, 2019

    Which Terrorism?

    The U.S. is about to make a disastrous blunder in its terrorism policies. In recent months, a series of savage shootings has drawn attention to the dangers posed by far-right, or white-supremacist, terrorism. Commentators from across the...
  • Hiding in Delusion
    Column
    September 01, 2019

    Hiding in Delusion

    Although Where’d You Go, Bernadette stars the incomparable Cate Blanchett along with a strong cast that includes Billy Crudup and Kristen Wiig, the film is a serious disappointment. I shouldn’t have been surprised, given it was released in...
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    September 01, 2019

    Books in Brief

    From Fire, by Water: My Journey to the Catholic Faith, by Sohrab Ahmari (San Francisco: Ignatius Press; 240 pp., $22.95). Sohrab Ahmari: Iranian immigrant, Roman Catholic convert, conservative, New York Post editor, and...
  • The Epstein Enigma
    Editorials
    September 01, 2019

    The Epstein Enigma

    According to the official narrative, on Aug. 10, 2019, Jeffrey Epstein, the billionaire playboy charged with sex-trafficking minors, committed suicide in his jail cell at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in New York City. Only a third of...
  • Judging the Past
    Editorials
    September 01, 2019

    Judging the Past

    Joshua Tait, who is completing a dissertation on the American conservative movement at the University of North Carolina, is a virtue-signaling expert on his object of study. Never does Tait hold back in judging past conservatives by his...
  • The Grip on Comedy Slips
    Editorials
    September 01, 2019

    The Grip on Comedy Slips

    Comedy has long been under the left’s control, as just one province of the U.S. entertainment empire centered in Hollywood—which is itself a bastion of leftist control over mainstream culture. But comedy is a rebellious province by its nature, as...
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    September 01, 2019

    What the Editors Are Reading

    How is it possible to describe Dostoevsky’s great but sometimes neglected novel, Notes From Underground, without provoking repugnance for the nameless anti- hero whose voice dominates its pages? He is, as he announces in the opening lines, “a...
  • Resurrecting the Old Right
    Society & Culture
    August 01, 2019

    Resurrecting the Old Right

    For those who may have noticed, I’ve been absent from this venerable magazine for more than 12 years. Upon returning, I feel obliged to give an account of what I’ve learned in the intervening time. Aside from visiting my family and doing research...
  • The Broken Promise of American Cities
    Views
    August 01, 2019

    The Broken Promise of American Cities

    There is a saying used in California when the going gets tough: “At least we have the weather.” No matter how expensive, dangerous, unclean, and generally inhospitable the state’s cities become, “at least we have the weather,” Californians say,...
  • Perot, the Proto-Trump
    Society & Culture
    August 01, 2019

    Perot, the Proto-Trump

    One evening in the fall of 2015, with the unlikely Donald J. Trump already dominating the race for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination, I ran into Ross Perot, Jr., at an exclusive charity event in Dallas. Perot is a billionaire real...
  • Boris Derangement Syndrome
    Column
    August 01, 2019

    Boris Derangement Syndrome

    Boris Derangement Syndrome has broken out in Britain. It is similar to the more widely documented American affliction, Trump Derangement Syndrome. BDS and TDS epidemics spread when the media and political classes are confronted with an empowered...
  • Greek Honor and Squad Shame
    Column
    August 01, 2019

    Greek Honor and Squad Shame

    Sailing in Homer’s wine-dark Aegean Sea, and traipsing all over the Acropolis and the marvels of antiquity, is the best antidote I know to the brouhaha over “The Squad.” It makes these four publicity-seeking, opportunistic mental dwarfs seem even...
  • Letter from a Legend
    Polemics & Exchanges
    August 01, 2019

    Letter from a Legend

    Chronicles’ editors should be commended for publishing several hard-hitting articles on the left’s pernicious censorship and particularly for providing an interview with a young friend of mine, Michael Millerman, who has been victimized by...
  • Silicon Valley Insider
    Polemics & Exchanges
    August 01, 2019

    Silicon Valley Insider

    The three articles about the destructive character of Silicon Valley (Chronicles, August 2019) were right on the mark and reminded me of how the area has changed over the years.
  • Democrats Adrift
    Editorials
    August 01, 2019

    Democrats Adrift

    The field of Democrats aspiring to be their party’s presidential nominee resembles what the Republican field of four years ago would have been, had Donald Trump not entered the race.
  • Trump's China Strategy
    Editorials
    August 01, 2019

    Trump's China Strategy

    Many years ago, Nobel laureate Paul Samuelson was challenged by a mathematician to name a single proposition in all social science that was both true and nontrivial. Samuelson proposed the principle of comparative advantage, first developed by...
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Editorials
    August 01, 2019

    What the Editors Are Reading

    During Russell Kirk’s fruitful lifetime I regularly took his sage advice concerning books I ought to read. Dr. Kirk had seemingly perused everything worth perusing. Thus, on his say-so in 1968, I read, marked, learned, and inwardly...
  • In Fair Verona, a Fight for Family
    Correspondence
    August 01, 2019

    In Fair Verona, a Fight for Family

    My husband and I touched down in Venice in late March, rented a Fiat 500, and drove through a rolling Italian countryside spotted with vineyards. Our destination was the medieval town of Verona. Verona has become something of a political...
  • California Apocalypse Now
    Correspondence
    August 01, 2019

    California Apocalypse Now

    Just about everybody I know, especially Republicans, is planning an exit strategy from California. A Los Angeles County firefighter I met at a party said all those guys, too, are planning to leave, despite their high salaries and pensions. Many...
  • The British Invasion of the Ozarks
    Correspondence
    August 01, 2019

    The British Invasion of the Ozarks

    Chronicles readers may recall my “Old Route 66” (September 2013) and “Keep the Water on Your Right” (February 2015) motorcycle travelogues, in which I rode through small towns and rural areas to reconnect with the land and people of America. A...
  • Noble Savages
    Polemics & Exchanges
    August 01, 2019

    Noble Savages

    Allensworth and Frye do a wonderful job dispelling human ignorance concerning the walls that have protected civilizations from barbarians (“Against the Barbarians,” Chronicles, July 2019). But, one thing mentioned bothers me:...
  • Ride On, Proud Boys!
    Society & Culture
    August 01, 2019

    Ride On, Proud Boys!

    Canada has not done much to assure the world it is anything other than a dog in search of a lap. Americans declared independence from England in 1776, but Canadians still haven’t mustered the gumption to cut ties with the mother island 522 years...
  • Spying on the American Remnant
    Reviews
    August 01, 2019

    Spying on the American Remnant

    As a boy, your author lived in a working-class neighborhood just outside Houston’s city limits. My parents were the children of rural people who had come to Houston looking for work during the Great Depression. They lived in frame houses sitting...
  • The Crucible of Innovation
    Reviews
    August 01, 2019

    The Crucible of Innovation

    It is an inconvenient fact—and one studiously neglected by proponents of unrestricted global migration—that the main military participants in the politically incorrect and toxically masculine medieval Crusades were migrants. Nubian infantry,...
  • Emperor of Imagination
    Reviews
    August 01, 2019

    Emperor of Imagination

    Charles the Great looms out of the swirling obscurity of post-Roman Europe like the Great Lighthouse of Alexandria, signaling simultaneously radical renewal and an alteration of everything that came before. As Janet Nelson illuminates in her new...
  • Hazardous Do-Overs
    Column
    August 01, 2019

    Hazardous Do-Overs

    America was founded on the idea of the second chance. People unhappy with their lives in Europe sailed to the New World, where they hoped they could escape oppression and failure. This gave rise to the peculiarly American idea that it is possible...
  • Five Modest Swamp-Draining Proposals
    Column
    July 01, 2019

    Five Modest Swamp-Draining Proposals

    How many times will naive voters fall for the old “When elected I will shrink the federal government” lie? If our Solipsist-in-Chief can’t “drain the swamp,” you can bet your last VHS Jazzercise tape that myriad new laws, middle-class tax cuts,...
  • Cold War Comfort
    Column
    July 01, 2019

    Cold War Comfort

    To say I was a difficult child is something of an understatement: I was a wild child. In retrospect, I can only feel sorry for my poor parents, who had no idea what to do with me. I was simply unmanageable. Unwilling to sit still in class, or...
  • The Naked and The Veiled
    Column
    July 01, 2019

    The Naked and The Veiled

    German director Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck’s new film, Never Look Away, now available for online streaming, considers the Nazi and communist twin ideologies that strove to perfect the human species via sterilization, euthanasia, and mass...
  • Interview With a Condemned Academic
    Society & Culture
    July 01, 2019

    Interview With a Condemned Academic

    Michael Millerman was a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Toronto when he got into trouble. The trouble wasn’t drugs or alcohol, debt, or academic improprieties. Nor was he troubled by poor academic performance. The trouble was that he was...
  • Cop in the SPLC's Crosshairs
    Correspondence
    July 01, 2019

    Cop in the SPLC's Crosshairs

    Schoolchildren all across America are taught they live in the Land of the Free and that freedom of speech is a bedrock right. This is patently untrue, especially if one falls into any of these unfortunate demographic categories: Christian, white,...
  • How Online Censorship Works
    Views
    July 01, 2019

    How Online Censorship Works

    The first level of online censorship happens without the victims even knowing it’s happening. Tweets, posts, articles, videos, comments, and websites of political content are all uploaded without resistance. But they aren’t seen, aren’t...
  • Rethinking Big Tech’s Legal Immunity
    Society & Culture
    July 01, 2019

    Rethinking Big Tech’s Legal Immunity

    Should Facebook, Google, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram or other purveyors of internet content be liable for damages if they fail to ensure that what they disseminate is not inaccurate, libelous, or otherwise dangerous and pernicious? There is a...
  • Silicon Valley Is Dumbing Down Kids
    Correspondence
    July 01, 2019

    Silicon Valley Is Dumbing Down Kids

    When I caught a seventh student in the classroom trying to bury his Chromebook in his crotch, clumsily angling the screen below the desk to hide the networked game he was playing, I wondered whether there’s any evidence that Chromebooks actually...
  • Wake-Up Call to the Scared Bunnies
    Reviews
    July 01, 2019

    Wake-Up Call to the Scared Bunnies

    A MarketWatch story this summer let us in on why millennials stash so little cash in 401(k) accounts. Like, given climate change, what’s the point? “The weather systems are already off,” a woman named Lori Rodriguez told a MarketWatch reporter,...
  • Supreme Court's Drifting Days Are Done
    Reviews
    July 01, 2019

    Supreme Court's Drifting Days Are Done

    This scrupulously objective book may be considered a gift to conservatives who have long despaired about the possibility of principled legal tenets regularly prevailing in Supreme Court opinions. For decades this long-suffering group has watched...
  • Let Us Now Praise Famous G-Men
    Reviews
    July 01, 2019

    Let Us Now Praise Famous G-Men

    Over the past few years, the United States federal government attempted a coup d’état against its own chief executive. Working from “opposition research” paid for by Hillary Clinton and the Democratic Party, the Deep State and its partners in the...
  • Justin Raimondo: Anti-War Crusader
    In Memoriam
    July 01, 2019

    Justin Raimondo: Anti-War Crusader

    Justin Raimondo, long-time Chronicles columnist, vociferous anti-war activist, and a leading member of the paleolibertarian political movement, died June 27 at age 67 after a long battle with lung cancer.
  • Remembering Slavery
    Column
    July 01, 2019

    Remembering Slavery

    The topic of slavery and reparations has been much in the news of late and might feature prominently in next year’s presidential elections. Slave ownership taints the reputations of historical figures, to the point of provoking campaigns against...
  • A Tale of Two Borders
    Column
    July 01, 2019

    A Tale of Two Borders

    One clear winner of the recent European Parliament elections was Italian Interior Minister Matteo Salvini, whose party won roughly a third of the votes, finishing well ahead of any other party. Salvini’s party, the Lega, began as a regional party...
  • The Old West's Deadly Doctor
    Column
    July 01, 2019

    The Old West's Deadly Doctor

    Most Americans know of Doc Holliday only as Wyatt Earp’s sidekick. He was much more than that. He was not only one of the most colorful characters in the Old West but also one of the most feared. He acquired the nickname “Doc” honestly, earning a...
  • Wasted Youth
    Column
    July 01, 2019

    Wasted Youth

    A wise man recently said: Our youth love luxury, they have bad manners, contempt for authority, they show disrespect for their elders, and no longer rise when a lady enters the room. They chatter instead of exercising, gobble up their food,...
  • Whither Chronicles?
    Polemics & Exchanges
    July 01, 2019

    Whither Chronicles?

    I have been a subscriber to Chronicles for roughly twenty-five years. I love the print magazine, which I intend to take until I pass on to my reward, its publication ceases, or its “voice” becomes indistinct from that of National Review,...
  • That Culture Thing
    Polemics & Exchanges
    July 01, 2019

    That Culture Thing

    We have been long-time subscribers and readers. Chronicles is one of many periodicals, newspapers, journals, magazines, books we read expressing thoughts that span the political idea spectrum. You state that you are a magazine of American...
  • Trump's Last Chance
    Editorials
    July 01, 2019

    Trump's Last Chance

    As President Donald Trump starts his reelection campaign in earnest, a major segment of his 2020 platform remains ambiguous. In the field of foreign and security policy, the next five or six months present Trump with the last opportunity to...
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    July 01, 2019

    What the Editors Are Reading

    Dostoevsky’s great 1866 novel Crime and Punishment and Aldous Huxley’s 1939 novel After Many a Summer Dies the Swan.
  • Books in Brief
    Reviews
    June 14, 2019

    Books in Brief

    I read Dan-el Padilla Peralta’s memoir of his illegal residency in the United States last week while on vacation in Germany, another country arguing about immigration.
  • Of Infants and Geezers
    Column
    June 14, 2019

    Of Infants and Geezers

    Unplanned is a remarkable piece of cinematic propaganda that seeks to tell the truth about abortion and Planned Parenthood. It’s based on a memoir of the same title written by Abby Johnson, who is played in the film by Ashley Bratcher.
  • Republic of War
    Reviews
    June 14, 2019

    Republic of War

    For a pacific, commercial republic protected by two giant oceans and two peaceful neighbors with small militaries, America sure has fought a lot of wars. Michael Beschloss’s Presidents of War details eight American leaders beginning in 1807 who...
  • We Ought to Like Ike
    Reviews
    June 14, 2019

    We Ought to Like Ike

    As a second-year West Point cadet in March 1969, I was returning to my room after chemistry class midafternoon on a Friday. As I stepped inside Pershing Barracks, I saw a number of cadets huddled around a note posted on the stairway railing.
  • Revisiting Suffrage
    Views
    June 14, 2019

    Revisiting Suffrage

    One hundred years have now passed since both houses of Congress passed the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution granting women the right to vote. For a long time, both major parties were ready to grant the suffrage, should American women...
  • 'Brazilian Trump' Rides Wave of Low Expectations
    Correspondence
    June 14, 2019

    'Brazilian Trump' Rides Wave of Low Expectations

    Jair Bolsonaro’s election to the presidency of Brazil last year provoked a media meltdown similar to Donald Trump’s victory in 2016.
  • Farage’s European Victory Upends British Politics
    Correspondence
    June 14, 2019

    Farage’s European Victory Upends British Politics

    When the 751 Members of the new European Parliament (MEPs) gather in the French city of Strasbourg on July 2, the largest national group present in all the EU will be the MEPs of Britain’s new Brexit Party led by Nigel Farage.
  • The Word Remains
    Column
    June 14, 2019

    The Word Remains

    The last time I visited John Lukacs at Pickering Close, his home just outside of Phoenixville, Penn., he greeted me in Hungarian. My knowledge of that language is confined to goulash and paprikash and the proper pronunciation of Budapest, so I...
  • Gun Grabbers Wave the Red Flag
    Society & Culture
    June 14, 2019

    Gun Grabbers Wave the Red Flag

    Every man, whether he is conscious of it or not, has drawn a line in the sand behind which he will not retreat. Most Americans have ancestors who defended that line when it was crossed by government tyranny. It is now being crossed in Colorado.
  • U.S. Economy Nears Growth Record
    Society & Culture
    June 14, 2019

    U.S. Economy Nears Growth Record

    The U.S. economy, absent a precipitous decline in payroll employment this quarter, will set a momentous record in July: the longest economic expansion in the nation’s 243-year history.
  • Against the Barbarians
    Reviews
    June 14, 2019

    Against the Barbarians

    The 21st century is a return to the Age of Walls. As historian and archeologist David Frye writes in his important new book, Walls: A History of Civilization in Blood and Brick, few have noticed that a new era of wall building is now upon us,...
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    June 14, 2019

    What the Editors Are Reading

    I’m enmeshed in reading all of Shakespeare, using the The New Oxford Shakespeare: Modern Critical Edition (Oxford University Press, 2016). Within 3,180 pages, it contains all the Bard’s writing in chronological order, from The Two Gentlemen of...
  • The Price of Overstretch
    Column
    June 14, 2019

    The Price of Overstretch

    “Everything in strategy is very simple,” Carl von Clausewitz wrote almost two centuries ago, “but that does not mean that everything is very easy.” The author of On War said it is easy to chart the course of a war once begun, but “great strength...
  • Orange Monster Charms the Brits
    Column
    June 14, 2019

    Orange Monster Charms the Brits

    In early June, British Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt stood on the airport tarmac waiting to greet President Donald Trump. Following the resignation of Theresa May, a Conservative leadership competition was underway, and Hunt was desperate to...
  • Belgians and Bureaucrats
    Column
    June 14, 2019

    Belgians and Bureaucrats

    Some years ago my friend and neighbor Baron Philip Lambert had my wife and me to dinner in his chalet in Gstaad, Switzerland, and the talk turned to Belgian history. Philip’s grandfather, a banker, had lent money to King Leopold II of Belgium to...
  • Big Tech Joins the Culture War
    Editorials
    June 14, 2019

    Big Tech Joins the Culture War

    The Silicon Valley censors have struck again. This time it’s against James O’Keefe’s Project Veritas for sins related to the practice of journalism, namely publishing documents allegedly exposing anti-Christian bias on the social media platform...
  • Camp of the Saints, Stateside
    Editorials
    June 14, 2019

    Camp of the Saints, Stateside

    In early June, border agents near San Diego did what they do a lot these days. They collared two previously deported sex criminals who had re-entered the United States illegally. Both men were convicted of sex crimes against children, Customs and...
  • Pious Tariffs
    Polemics & Exchanges
    June 14, 2019

    Pious Tariffs

    In “Protectionism as a Path to Piety” (May 2019 issue), John Howting appears to assert that protective tariffs are acts of piety.
  • A Memorable Secession
    Polemics & Exchanges
    June 14, 2019

    A Memorable Secession

    I haven’t read The Land We Love: The South and Its Heritage, and judging by Donald Livingston’s review (May 2019 issue) I probably won’t. Why? Because it sounds like yet another attempt to defend “Lost Cause” ideology.
  • Homo Economicus
    Polemics & Exchanges
    June 14, 2019

    Homo Economicus

    I want to thank Greg Kaza for his review of “Globalists” in the June issue. He has called to attention some extremely relevant points, which are necessary for understanding current events.
  • College Admissions and Other Rites of Fragility
    Reviews
    May 17, 2019

    College Admissions and Other Rites of Fragility

    Think of the angst the recent college admissions scandal has caused in wealthy households from Greenwich to La Jolla, and nowhere in between, except maybe Winnetka.
  • Getting Real About Reparations
    Column
    May 17, 2019

    Getting Real About Reparations

    The call for slavery reparations is reverberating throughout the land once again. It will be entertaining to watch the Democratic presidential candidates for 2020 position themselves on this topic.
  • Tethered and Beleaguered
    Column
    May 17, 2019

    Tethered and Beleaguered

    Jordan Peele is the executive producer of the revived Twilight Zone series now streaming on CBS All Access. The original series fascinated him when he was a boy and he was determined to revive it.
  • In This Number
    In This Number
    May 17, 2019

    In This Number

    John Elliott leads this issue’s compilation of tributes to Aaron Wolf, which also includes pieces from many long-time Chronicles contributors.
  • The Art of the No-Deal
    Editorials
    May 17, 2019

    The Art of the No-Deal

    Trump’s decision to walk away from the Hanoi Summit in February and reject the terms of a possible deal—ending all sanctions in return for a partial denuclearization—was a disappointment for his supporters. But it is only the beginning of a...
  • Anglo-Apologia
    Polemics & Exchanges
    May 17, 2019

    Anglo-Apologia

    Can reviewer Ralph Berry find nothing in the public life of Winston Churchill that was negative, or was there nothing of that nature in Andrew Robert’s new book: Churchill: Walking with Destiny?
  • Aaron D. Wolf: A Man of Faith and Family
    In Memoriam
    May 17, 2019

    Aaron D. Wolf: A Man of Faith and Family

    The executive editor of Chronicles, Aaron Wolf, died suddenly and tragically on Easter Sunday. He left behind a loving wife and six children, and colleagues and contributors to this magazine who admired him greatly.
  • Farewell to My Fellow Traveler
    In Memoriam
    May 17, 2019

    Farewell to My Fellow Traveler

    Whatever libertarians and Marxists say, human experience is neither the pursuit of self-interest nor is it class struggle. Man is made for the worship of God and for human friendship. Anyone who knew Aaron Wolf knows this truth.
  • Notre Dame and the Lost ‘Means of Culture’
    Correspondence
    May 17, 2019

    Notre Dame and the Lost ‘Means of Culture’

    The fire that gutted Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris during Holy Week was no doubt caused by nothing more banal than negligent builders doing restoration work on the roof. Nevertheless it compelled all of us to search for a deeper explanation.
  • Sweetness
    In Memoriam
    May 17, 2019

    Sweetness

    Easter 2019 was a vivid reminder that Good Friday still precedes Easter Sunday. The global news machine brought us horrific images of Christians massacred in their churches by Islamic terrorists in Sri Lanka.
  • Covington Catholic and the Hour of Decision
    Correspondence
    May 17, 2019

    Covington Catholic and the Hour of Decision

    Except for my time in college and a few years living in Washington, D.C., I have spent my entire life in Central Kentucky. I live less than 90 miles from Covington Catholic High School, and like most Kentuckians, I was familiar with the school ...
  • Let’s Stop Equating Slavery and Abortion
    Society & Culture
    May 17, 2019

    Let’s Stop Equating Slavery and Abortion

    Frequently, pro-life leaders draw a parallel between slavery and abortion. “You Say Abortion Is Legal? The Supreme Court Also Legalized Slavery,” reads one popular bumper sticker.
  • The War of Nihilisms
    Reviews
    May 17, 2019

    The War of Nihilisms

    The first English translation of Ernst Jünger’s journals from the Second World War is a cause for celebration. The journals were like treasures stashed away in an old castle, behind a door that could be unlocked only if one learned to read...
  • The Other Road to Serfdom
    Reviews
    May 17, 2019

    The Other Road to Serfdom

    The World Trade Organization (WTO) has been criticized since its founding in 1995. Leftists claim that free trade places the Third World at a disadvantage, while President Donald Trump and paleo conservatives argue that some WTO policies threaten...
  • Unconscious Beauty
    Reviews
    May 17, 2019

    Unconscious Beauty

    This handsome hardbound volume, an authoritative study in art history that can pass as a coffee-table book, is billed by its publisher as “the first-ever history of the representation of dreams in Western painting.”
  • The Death of Comedy
    Society & Culture
    May 17, 2019

    The Death of Comedy

    The left hates comedy. It subverts and challenges the dicta of the liberal hegemony, and is closed down whenever possible. The Left has had notable successes, especially in Britain, where I can point precisely to the roughly two decades in which...
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    May 17, 2019

    Books in Brief

    In this second volume of the Age of the French Revolution series, first published in 1978, Manceron explores the influence on Europe of both American democratic thought and politics during the American Revolution and early nationalist periods.
  • Missing the Main Story
    Column
    May 17, 2019

    Missing the Main Story

    In 1946, the U.S. intelligence community published a series of studies on the current and future dangers threatening global peace, and among these was a surprisingly detailed essay entitled, “Islam: A Threat to World Stability.”
  • Not ‘Woke’ and Not Sorry
    Column
    May 17, 2019

    Not ‘Woke’ and Not Sorry

    “Woke” is the concept that everything must be inclusive and inoffensive. Oh dear! Being hyperaware of everyone’s sensitivities makes one a hell of a bore. I recently flew down to Charlottesville, Virginia, where I had gone to university, to speak...
  • We Happy Few
    Polemics & Exchanges
    May 17, 2019

    We Happy Few

    Regarding Jeff Minick’s April 2019 article, “Happy Warriors:” The reason the Left is winning is because they actually fight for their side in the culture war while the Right does not.
  • The Lady of the Camellias
    Column
    May 17, 2019

    The Lady of the Camellias

    I once asked a most discriminating gentleman, who had studied singing, which opera he would call his favorite. He named La traviata. Since then, René Weis has lent support to his opinion at fascinating length in his book, The Real Traviata: The...
  • Cuba: What’s Next?
    Views
    May 17, 2019

    Cuba: What’s Next?

    What are the effects of John Bolton’s “Troika of Tyranny” approach, lumping Cuba together with Venezuela and Nicaragua, and ramping up sanctions?
  • Bibi’s Reelection Nixes Peace Plan
    Column
    May 17, 2019

    Bibi’s Reelection Nixes Peace Plan

    Early legislative elections in Israel on April 9 have not changed the country’s political landscape. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has been reelected for an unprecedented fourth consecutive term and will soon exceed the late David...
  • Healthcare in a Humane Society
    Correspondence
    April 04, 2019

    Healthcare in a Humane Society

    The night had started off great. A few weeks earlier I had agreed to speak at the New York premiere of the American Enterprise Institute President Arthur Brooks’s forthcoming documentary The Pursuit.
  • The Left: A History of Violence
    Society & Culture
    April 04, 2019

    The Left: A History of Violence

    The sight of American leftists getting on their moral high horses to attribute blame to conservatives for the growth of political violence in America is exasperating, to say the least.
  • The Little Guy and the Right
    Society & Culture
    April 04, 2019

    The Little Guy and the Right

    To judge from what is going on in Italy, the only major European country where populists are in power, right-wing populism works, but left-wing populism does not.
  • Rough Men, Rough Language
    Society & Culture
    April 04, 2019

    Rough Men, Rough Language

    My father is an Army veteran, a former auto-body worker, and a retired policeman who for many years worked undercover in vice and narcotics. Needless to say, associating with his friends and colleagues and loitering around the body shop while...
  • Manifest(o)
    Column
    April 04, 2019

    Manifest(o)

    Whenever an act of violence is committed against Muslims by a non-Muslim, as Brenton Tarrant did in March when he viciously gunned down 50 Muslims at prayer in Christchurch, New Zealand, the left-liberal elites of the West and their...
  • An Understandable Curiosity
    Reviews
    April 04, 2019

    An Understandable Curiosity

    This is a massive biography of an economic historian whose popular fame rests on his having been made one of 65 Companions of Honour by the Queen while remaining a member of the Communist Party of Great Britain.
  • The Winds of Time
    Column
    April 04, 2019

    The Winds of Time

    The wind roared all night, darkness in furious motion that yet held solidly in place. It was still gusting hard when Harlan Edmonds’ Dodge pickup pulled into the drive beside the house at ten in the morning and stopped behind my Ford standing...
  • The End of Politics
    Editorials
    April 04, 2019

    The End of Politics

    Politics are over in America. Political maneuvering will go on, of course, but the old civics-class view of American political life was based on a set of assumptions that are no longer operative.
  • In This Number
    In This Number
    April 04, 2019

    In This Number

    Here at the beginning of the May issue, I am pleased to introduce a new feature, In This Number, which will henceforth introduce each new issue of Chronicles.
  • Opera Managed and Mismanaged
    Column
    April 04, 2019

    Opera Managed and Mismanaged

    Heidi Waleson’s Mad Scenes and Exit Arias: The Death of the New York City Opera and the Future of Opera in America (2018) is a challenging and enlightening work—one which dares much and succeeds remarkably well.
  • Monarchs and Pretenders
    Column
    April 04, 2019

    Monarchs and Pretenders

    The story of Mary Queen of Scots makes you wonder why anyone would aspire to be a monarch. Mary was an accomplished woman. She had mastered five languages, English being the third; was schooled in the classics; had traveled extensively in...
  • Protectionism as a Path to Piety
    Views
    April 04, 2019

    Protectionism as a Path to Piety

    Frédéric Bastiat’s Candlestick Makers’ Petition, an open letter to the French Parliament written in 1845, gets trotted out by free-trade fundamentalists every time anyone says the word tariff.
  • Christchurch: The Sharia Enabling Act
    Column
    April 04, 2019

    Christchurch: The Sharia Enabling Act

    Violent incidents, perpetrated by the opponents of a tyrannical regime, tend to enable such regimes to become openly terrorist. They may have been on a brutal trajectory all along, but their enemies’ acts of desperate defiance (or plain...
  • Faithful Son
    Reviews
    April 04, 2019

    Faithful Son

    Boyd Cathey is an 11th generation Carolina Tar Heel who was mentored by and worked with Russell Kirk. The Land We Love: The South and Its Heritage is written reverentially, just as one might reflect on the memory of one’s mother.
  • Bodio’s Country
    Reviews
    April 04, 2019

    Bodio’s Country

    Stephen Bodio is a memoirist, journalist, critic, sportswriter, naturalist, outdoorsman, hunter, falconer, bird breeder, dog breeder, and now a novelist.
  • <em>Books In Brief</em>
    Reviews
    April 04, 2019

    Books In Brief

    The French dislike what they call “Anglo-American economics” even more than they dislike English and American cookery; also, more recently, progressive Anglo-American views regarding the supposed identicality between the sexes.
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    April 04, 2019

    What the Editors Are Reading

    Always keen to read travel books about Mexico, I picked up an elderly copy (printed by A. Appleton & Company in 1921) of Viva Mexico! by Charles Macomb Flandrau that I came across in a local bookshop.
  • Sufficient to the Day
    Column
    April 04, 2019

    Sufficient to the Day

    I take a lot of pictures. I am old enough to have spent thousands of dollars on film and photo developing over three decades, from my late single digits up until about the age of 35.
  • Not Like the Other
    Column
    April 04, 2019

    Not Like the Other

    We often hear opponents of U.S. action abroad denounced as “anti-American.” On the other hand, these alleged anti-Americans present themselves as anti-interventionists—opponents of the policy and not the country. So how to tell the difference?
  • Stuck in the Middle With May
    Column
    April 04, 2019

    Stuck in the Middle With May

    I’m quite moved these days when I meet Americans and they ask me, ever so delicately, “How’s Brexit?” Or: “How’s that Brexit thing going?” Or, “Are you guys going to be OK with the Brexit?”
  • Deplorable Duke
    Column
    April 04, 2019

    Deplorable Duke

    In 1979, as John Wayne was dying, his friend and costar in five movies, Maureen O’Hara, went to Capitol Hill to urge Congress to issue a medal honoring Wayne.
  • Unplug Your P.C.
    Column
    April 04, 2019

    Unplug Your P.C.

    OK, sport fans, get your wallets out and start giving. That’s the latest brainstorm from a New York Times columnist who makes an unconvincing case for reparations to black people.
  • We’ll Get Him Next Time
    Editorials
    April 04, 2019

    We’ll Get Him Next Time

    After two years and tens of millions of dollars, the Mueller investigation ended in a shattering anticlimax for Democrats. On March 22, Special Counsel Robert Mueller sent Attorney General William Barr his report, and Barr promptly informed...
  • The Crisis in the Anglosphere
    Editorials
    April 04, 2019

    The Crisis in the Anglosphere

    Pro-democratic ideological think tanks that evaluate the future of democracy by the extent of its global spread and the fortunes of relatively insignificant countries around the world should be far more concerned with events currently occurring...
  • Sex Erased
    Polemics & Exchanges
    April 04, 2019

    Sex Erased

    George McCartney is usually right on in his cultural analyses of current films, but he made a couple of statements in his review of Boy Erased (“Mortal Coils,” In the Dark, January) that must be addressed.
  • Liar From the Beginning
    Polemics & Exchanges
    April 04, 2019

    Liar From the Beginning

    Aaron D. Wolf is absolutely right to argue that, from a Christian perspective, J.J. Rousseau is the fountainhead of political evil in our day (“Ignoble Savages,” January-March, Heresies).
  • Borders and Other Silly Concerns
    Society & Culture
    March 07, 2019

    Borders and Other Silly Concerns

    My housekeeper personifies the American Dream. Her journey from rags may not have ended in riches. But she now enjoys a solid middle-class existence after decades of backbreaking labor. Born and raised in the Mexican state of Puebla, Laura...
  • The Long Apocalypse
    Reviews
    March 07, 2019

    The Long Apocalypse

    Today, a century after the close of the “war to end all wars,” the prospect of achieving what the U.N. and other such garrulous bodies call “global peace” seems ever more remote.
  • No Justice, No Peace
    Reviews
    March 07, 2019

    No Justice, No Peace

    There is no pleasing Duke University law professor Brandon L. Garrett, author of the death-penalty-abolishment screed End of Its Rope: How Killing the Death Penalty Can Revive Criminal Justice, though much about the current state of criminal...
  • <em>Books In Brief</em>
    Reviews
    March 07, 2019

    Books In Brief

    It is expected of an author that he say something new and big about someone or something new and big, even should it have been so for two years already. President Trump remains something new and big, though his detractors by now appear old and...
  • Happy Warriors
    Society & Culture
    March 07, 2019

    Happy Warriors

    For decades, conservative commentators and writers have told anyone who would listen that America is going to hell in a handbag. James Burnham’s Suicide of the West, John Derbyshire’s We Are Doomed, Pat Buchanan’s Suicide of a Superpower, Mark...
  • The Wall: Moral and Good
    Column
    March 07, 2019

    The Wall: Moral and Good

    President Donald Trump’s predecessors have circumvented Congress before on issues the legislative branch had tried to stop. They have redirected resources appropriated by lawmakers.
  • Returning to Earth
    Column
    March 07, 2019

    Returning to Earth

    What lies at the root of the abstractionism that I discussed last month, which afflicts the modern world like a mania, especially here in the United States? Walker Percy dubbed the phenomenon angelism, by which he did not mean that those who...
  • NeverTrump, No Reserve
    Column
    March 07, 2019

    NeverTrump, No Reserve

    The enormity of what we’re up against is something I acknowledge in the abstract, but blank out of my consciousness 99 percent of the time. It’s only when I come across an article like Alexander Rubinstein’s and Max Blumenthal’s recent exposé of...
  • Opera Near & Far
    Column
    March 07, 2019

    Opera Near & Far

    My relationship with Barnes & Noble is fraught with emotion simply because it is a big bookstore, among other things. And I am one of those types—an inveterate reader—who is easily hooked.
  • Uncle Sap Mans Up
    Column
    March 07, 2019

    Uncle Sap Mans Up

    Hold the presses! More Germans trust Vladimir Putin’s Russia than Trump’s United States. This is earth-shattering news, a scoop like no other. If this were 1969, the moon landing would be a smaller headline.
  • Ideologies and Priorities
    Editorials
    March 07, 2019

    Ideologies and Priorities

    Now here’s a headline: “Blackface, sexual assault scandals don’t appear to have tarnished Virginia’s image,” the Washington Post declared on March 3. The story referred to controversies surrounding each of the commonwealth’s three top statewide...
  • The U.S. and the E.U.
    Editorials
    March 07, 2019

    The U.S. and the E.U.

    Washington never made any particular secret of its jaundiced view of Brexit as suggested succinctly by President Obama when he warned that Great Britain, if she voted to leave the European Union, would need to go to “the back of the queue” of...
  • Poet Against Empire
    Views
    March 07, 2019

    Poet Against Empire

    When I mention that I am reading Robinson Jeffers, even cultivated and well-read people look bemused; the name seems obscure. By way of explanation, I borrow the closing words of the classic gangster film The Roaring Twenties: “He used to be a...
  • Migrant Dreams and Nightmares
    Correspondence
    March 07, 2019

    Migrant Dreams and Nightmares

    On Thursday January 17, news broke in the Netherlands that a Dutch journalist had been expelled from Turkey. Ans Boersma, 31, had been detained the day before in Istanbul when she applied to renew her residence visa.
  • James Howard: Two-Theater Double Ace
    Column
    March 07, 2019

    James Howard: Two-Theater Double Ace

    One would think the only American fighter pilot to earn the Medal of Honor in World War II in Europe would be remembered and honored, or at least mentioned in history textbooks in high school and college. No such luck today.
  • The Thousand Faces of “Me”
    In Our Time
    March 07, 2019

    The Thousand Faces of “Me”

    In 1976 New York published a lengthy essay, “The ‘Me’ Decade and the Third Great Awakening,” by the reporter and novelist Tom Wolfe, who died last year, aged 88. Wolfe argued that mass prosperity in the postwar era had erased the historical...
  • Democracy and Infanticide
    Column
    March 07, 2019

    Democracy and Infanticide

    During the polar vortex of 2019 the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act had its day in the United States Senate but, thanks to the opposition of Democrats, failed to meet the required number of votes necessary to end debate and call the...
  • Culture Wars!
    Correspondence
    March 07, 2019

    Culture Wars!

    The bitter war of words that has taken place the best part of this past year between France and Italy culminated in the French government taking the extraordinary step of withdrawing its ambassador to Rome in February.
  • Replacement Theories
    Reviews
    March 07, 2019

    Replacement Theories

    In 2004, Dutch political scientist Cas Mudde published The Populist Zeitgeist, an attempt to define the growingly important but haphazardly applied concept of “populism.” He had an emotional as well as an academic interest, because “far-right”...
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    March 07, 2019

    What the Editors Are Reading

    When I was in my middle teens I read all or most of Sinclair Lewis’s work. It seems impossible, but it is a fact nevertheless that Main Street will be a century old next year, and Babbitt in 2022.
  • Race and the Classless Society
    Society & Culture
    March 07, 2019

    Race and the Classless Society

    A few months ago I was on a long plane ride when something rather startling happened: Someone sitting near me was actually polite. He was in the seat immediately in front of mine, and before reclining he turned to look over his shoulder and...
  • No Message Could’ve Been Any Clearer
    Editorials
    March 07, 2019

    No Message Could’ve Been Any Clearer

    Michael Jackson is the mirror of the children of liberal America, even though he is dead. Obsessed with their appearance, they keep hacking away at their features until they are unrecognizable as humans.
  • Breeze Over the Border With Me
    Society & Culture
    February 07, 2019

    Breeze Over the Border With Me

    Let’s conduct a thought experiment. Imagine that you have just landed at New York’s JFK International Airport after a 15-hour flight from Mumbai.
  • Nationalism: More to Learn
    Reviews
    February 07, 2019

    Nationalism: More to Learn

    However much they may enjoy watching Captain von Trapp sing “Edelweiss” in The Sound of Music, most Catholic intellectuals nowadays are squeamish about delving too deeply into the production’s historical background.
  • Winter of Our Discontent
    Column
    February 07, 2019

    Winter of Our Discontent

    As fall turned into winter, there were unmistakable signs of paleoconservative dissatisfaction with President Trump.
  • Power and Betrayal
    Column
    February 07, 2019

    Power and Betrayal

    In Vice, director Adam McKay takes a hatchet to Dick Cheney, joining a long line of detractors of our 46th Vice President. This is too bad. Not because Cheney deserves better.
  • Ireland’s Anti-Christian Revolution
    Views
    February 07, 2019

    Ireland’s Anti-Christian Revolution

    Secular anti-Catholicism can fairly be described as the ruling ideology of the modern Republic of Ireland. In no other country do politicians and the media so openly, persistently, and savagely attack the Catholic Church.
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    February 07, 2019

    Books in Brief

    This is the second volume of the author’s biography of Saul Bellow, a massive and no doubt definitive work, minutely researched and very well written.
  • Homage to Edward Abbey
    In Our Time
    February 07, 2019

    Homage to Edward Abbey

    The March issue of Chronicles coincides with the 30th anniversary of the passing of novelist, essayist, poet, and conservationist Edward Abbey.
  • Steve Bannon’s Gladiator School: A View From Within
    Correspondence
    February 07, 2019

    Steve Bannon’s Gladiator School: A View From Within

    Here, in this huge deserted monastery founded in 1204, which has 15,000 square meters of roof, President Donald Trump’s former chief strategist and the former chief executive of Breitbart News, Stephen K. Bannon, has founded what he told me will...
  • Secular Nationalism Is Not Enough
    Correspondence
    February 07, 2019

    Secular Nationalism Is Not Enough

    The Turkic peoples began as steppe nomads, then became soldiers and eventually farmers and city-dwellers. As they made these transitions they came to dominate ancient centers along the Silk Road.
  • Ignoble Savages, Part 3
    Column
    February 07, 2019

    Ignoble Savages, Part 3

    Toxic is the combination of equality and evolution, of Rousseau and Darwin. Blended together and served upon the paps of public schools, television, and social media, they are the essential ingredients of the gall-milk of the postmodern world.
  • Life Is Not a Fantasy
    Column
    February 07, 2019

    Life Is Not a Fantasy

    The reality of place has weighed heavily on me from a very young age. My knowledge of self has always been inseparable from the place in which I live.
  • From Such Turn Away
    Reviews
    February 07, 2019

    From Such Turn Away

    Dr. Daniel Mahoney, the Augustine Chair in Distinguished Scholarship at Assumption College, has written a most scholarly and challenging book, in which he argues that “humanitarianism” without grounding in faith is a danger to our civilization.
  • Chief of Men
    Reviews
    February 07, 2019

    Chief of Men

    Of the making of books about Churchill there is no end. The latest is the best to date. Andrew Roberts reduces Churchill’s epic life to some 1,100 pages, offering a précis of the great events in which he was involved while drawing on 40 new...
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    February 07, 2019

    What the Editors Are Reading

    I’m rereading large portions of Ed Abbey’s books (of course) as Chronicles goes to press: Desert Solitaire, Black Sun and The Fool’s Progress (both novels), Abbey’s Road, One Life at a Time, Please, Down the River, Beyond the Wall, The Journey...
  • Opera Without Meaning
    Column
    February 07, 2019

    Opera Without Meaning

    Last year, in a January 3 review published by the Daily Telegraph, Hannah Furness made some remarkable assertions concerning the presentation of traditional operas on the modern stage.
  • Your Pink Hat Is Transphobic
    Society & Culture
    February 07, 2019

    Your Pink Hat Is Transphobic

    If Madonna were a standard white person, her appearance at the August 2018 MTV Video Music Awards . . . would have brought the leftist brownshirts snarling like rabid coons into the streets and onto the Sunday talk shows.
  • The Pope and the Art of Self-Deception
    Column
    February 07, 2019

    The Pope and the Art of Self-Deception

    Pope Francis, the first Pontiff to visit the Arabian Peninsula, attended a hugely publicized interfaith meeting in the United Arab Emirates on February 4 as part of what the Vatican described as his “outreach to the Muslim world.”
  • Proceed With the Neverendum
    Column
    February 07, 2019

    Proceed With the Neverendum

    It would be fun to write a Westminster column that wasn’t about Brexit. I’m afraid I can’t. Brexit is Britain, to a large extent, these days, at least as far as the news is concerned.
  • Gillette Meets Dick the Butcher
    Column
    February 07, 2019

    Gillette Meets Dick the Butcher

    Everyone’s rather angry nowadays. Women, gays, lesbians, bisexuals, blacks, Hispanics, American Indians, college students, college professors, Hollywood stars, Democratic politicians—you name them, they’re upset.
  • Blackface—and White
    Editorials
    February 07, 2019

    Blackface—and White

    Dr. Ralph Northam, the Democratic governor of Virginia, aetat. 59, is under enormous pressure to resign his position after a conservative website revealed the fact that his page in his medical school yearbook from 1984 carries a photograph of two...
  • The Belligerent Advantage of Congress
    Editorials
    February 07, 2019

    The Belligerent Advantage of Congress

    The way foreign-policy mavens in Washington, D.C., talk about Afghanistan, you would think that country had successfully launched a ballistic-missile attack against us on 9/11.
  • Trump and the Right
    Editorials
    February 07, 2019

    Trump and the Right

    It seems that a part of Donald Trump’s base—the part that writes and otherwise comments on him, anyway—is angry with the President for having reopened the portions of the federal government he had shut down for 35 days after failing to obtain...
  • Angels of Death, Arrayed in White
    Editorials
    February 07, 2019

    Angels of Death, Arrayed in White

    The state of the Union is divided, as we were reminded not only after but during the President’s speech of February 5. Republicans chanted “USA! USA!” several times in response to lines delivered to elicit the same; Democrats (upon whom the...
  • An Infrastructure of Crumbs and Bananas
    Society & Culture
    January 10, 2019

    An Infrastructure of Crumbs and Bananas

    The current American cultural and economic transformation, which arguably started in the late 20th century, is now approaching its nadir. Americans will more likely mourn this transition than celebrate it.
  • Ignoble Savages, Part 2
    Column
    January 10, 2019

    Ignoble Savages, Part 2

    The body of the hapless American missionary John Chau has been abandoned to the North Sentinelese. By the lights of the Indian government and the leaders of the Western world, the savages may do with it as they please.
  • What Beto Revealed
    Correspondence
    January 10, 2019

    What Beto Revealed

    For Texas conservatives, a surprisingly strong showing by Democrats in their deep-red state in November’s midterm election was an unexpected wake-up call. The results also set me to thinking about my own personal history with the Lone Star State.
  • Dowering Our Daughters
    Society & Culture
    January 10, 2019

    Dowering Our Daughters

    The world lacks drinking games relating to women’s studies, so here’s a suggestion: If you can get a women’s studies stalwart to say the word coverture before the conversation’s second minute elapses, throw one back for the 21st Amendment.
  • Brexit’s Bitter Irony
    Correspondence
    January 10, 2019

    Brexit’s Bitter Irony

    One of the easiest-to-diagnose symptoms of the existential crisis that is causing the decline and fall of Western civilization is the deepening disconnect between peoples and governments.
  • Designer Asylum
    Editorials
    January 10, 2019

    Designer Asylum

    Because of the Internet, old-fashioned travel agents are nearly as obsolete as ocean-going passenger liners. In their place a new sort of agent is arising: the migrant or asylum agent, formerly known as the people smuggler.
  • The Fatherland and the Nation
    Views
    January 10, 2019

    The Fatherland and the Nation

    Allen Tate, in 1952, argued that the first duty of the man of letters in the postwar world was to purify the language from the corruptions introduced by ideology and the destruction, more than physical, wrought by the recent world war.
  • What Is Populism?
    In Our Time
    January 10, 2019

    What Is Populism?

    Dining out with my wife in a restaurant in Paris recently, I became aware of the well-dressed Frenchman seated with his wife two tables away from us listening in on our conversation. The table for two between us was unoccupied.
  • Glimpses Delightful and Rare
    Reviews
    January 10, 2019

    Glimpses Delightful and Rare

    One of the root problems facing our beleaguered world is that many of our contemporaries are belaboring the past as a burden, believing that the legacy and traditions of Western Civilization are a millstone around modernity’s neck.
  • The Iceberg Cometh
    Reviews
    January 10, 2019

    The Iceberg Cometh

    Throughout the Introduction and into the first chapter of Ship of Fools you seem to be seated before a television screen listening to, and watching, Tucker Carlson in his nightly broadcast.
  • March On
    Reviews
    January 10, 2019

    March On

    What you might find on a long walk, a determined walk, a walk of exploration, you never know, of course, until you take the next step. And the next; and the next—in Rory Stewart’s case, across the constantly revelatory terrain of the borderlands...
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    January 10, 2019

    Books in Brief

    Here is no doubt the best, most comprehensive, most politically balanced and appropriately distanced of the now four notable biographies of Charles de Gaulle.
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    January 10, 2019

    What the Editors Are Reading

    In its issue for December 20, 2018, the New York Review of Books published an essay by Mark Lilla, a professor at Columbia University, titled “Two Roads for the New French Right.”
  • William Lundigan
    Column
    January 10, 2019

    William Lundigan

    Of our 20th-century wars World War II stands alone. In a sneak attack early on Sunday morning, December 7, 1941, Japanese naval forces bombed Pearl Harbor. As reports were broadcast throughout the day American shock turned to anger.
  • Adieu to the “Adults in the Room”
    Column
    January 10, 2019

    Adieu to the “Adults in the Room”

    President Donald Trump’s announcement last December 19 that he would immediately withdraw all U.S. forces from Syria (and one-half of the Afghan contingent) is the most important single decision of his presidency.
  • Picture This
    Column
    January 10, 2019

    Picture This

    Last year, just before his 21st birthday, my son Jacob learned of a condition called aphantasia. In its strictest form, aphantasia is the inability to create mental images.
  • Throwing Off the Albatross
    Column
    January 10, 2019

    Throwing Off the Albatross

    It came as a bolt of lightning out of the blue. One moment the Trump administration was besieged on all sides. The media were accusing him of treason, and the Democrats, having just taken control of the House of Representatives, were promising...
  • The <em>Carnaval</em> Prank Was On Me
    Column
    January 10, 2019

    The Carnaval Prank Was On Me

    Sometimes the best things come in distorting packages, no matter how good they are. And sometimes that good is itself misleading when it has great appeal, or even particularly then.
  • Mortal Remains
    Column
    January 10, 2019

    Mortal Remains

    Near the end of The Ballad of Buster Scruggs, the Coen brothers’ latest cinematic whimsy being shown on Netflix, Brendan Gleeson sings a ditty (a British ballad called “The Unfortunate Lad,” on which “The Streets of Laredo” was based) that...
  • AOC and GOP Suicide
    Editorials
    January 10, 2019

    AOC and GOP Suicide

    As the new Congress was sworn in early in January, the Republican Party unveiled a plan for its own assisted suicide. In fact, Mitt Romney got started before he was even seated as the latest senator from Utah.
  • Tucker Carlson’s Firebell
    Editorials
    January 10, 2019

    Tucker Carlson’s Firebell

    Tucker Carlson shook the punditariat, liberal and conservative alike, with his incisive analysis, delivered during one of his show monologues, of the breakdown of the American family, a genuine four-alarm crisis that cannot be exaggerated.
  • Appropriating Culture
    Polemics & Exchanges
    January 10, 2019

    Appropriating Culture

    Thank you for publishing the piece by David B. Schock on the Elkhart Jazz Festival of 2018 (“Blowing for Elkhart,” Correspondence, December). As a longtime resident of New Orleans in the past, I have particular reasons to savor his reports and...
  • Trump’s Razor
    Society & Culture
    December 07, 2018

    Trump’s Razor

    Blame everything on Trump. Your car won’t start? It’s Trump’s fault. Your dog threw up in the living room? It’s Trump’s fault. The media have lost their collective mind. That’s definitely Trump’s fault. And the blame game seems to get worse by...
  • Ignoble Savages, Part 1
    Column
    December 07, 2018

    Ignoble Savages, Part 1

    Hardly anyone thought much about the mysterious inhabitants of North Sentinel Island, whom we call the Sentinelese (because we have no idea what else to call them), until the close of November in the Year of Our Lord 2018.
  • The Faults of Woodward and Trump
    Reviews
    December 07, 2018

    The Faults of Woodward and Trump

    There’s a lot of buncombe in Bob Woodward’s Fear: Trump in the White House. Doubtless Chronicles readers heard some of it when the book was released on September 13, as the mainstream media played and replayed on the hour reports of Chief of...
  • The Empty Plinth
    Reviews
    December 07, 2018

    The Empty Plinth

    With the Midterm Elections safely behind us, should we count on the left to renounce the fun of castigating nonleft types for their racism, sexism, and hetero normativism? Not on a bet.
  • Displaced Persons
    Reviews
    December 07, 2018

    Displaced Persons

    In an age of anti-elite anger, it might seem otiose to publish an academic analysis of aristocratic ideas in Western thought. But as the post-1945 order rattles itself to pieces, it is time to look past its bankrupted beliefs and discredited...
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    December 07, 2018

    Books in Brief

    Andrew Jackson ran for President in 1824 and was defeated by John Quincy Adams, the son of former President John Adams.
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    December 07, 2018

    What the Editors Are Reading

    I expected something quite different than I got when I began reading As A City on a Hill: The Story of America’s Most Famous Lay Sermon, by Daniel T. Rodgers and just released by Basic Books. I am not yet very far into it, but plan on taking it...
  • A Century of Disorder
    Column
    December 07, 2018

    A Century of Disorder

    The Paris Peace Conference opened at the Palace of Versailles 100 years ago (January 18, 1919). It was the most ambitious gathering of its kind in history: Leaders and diplomats of 27 nations convened to shape the future, a mere ten weeks after...
  • Pontius Pilate, Ora Pro Nobis
    Column
    December 07, 2018

    Pontius Pilate, Ora Pro Nobis

    To the leaders of the Free Speech Movement of the 1960’s, self-censorship was as dangerous as the social enforcement of civility by private organizations and by public educational institutions, and those social norms were, in turn, just as...
  • Muse of Apollo
    Column
    December 07, 2018

    Muse of Apollo

    Is it really necessary to explain why President Trump’s proposed Space Force would be a boon to humankind? Do I have to contrast such a noble project with the other possible uses to which our tax dollars would be put?
  • Chopin’s Life and Times
    Column
    December 07, 2018

    Chopin’s Life and Times

    Alan Walker has insisted, at the very beginning of his massive new biography of Chopin, that the composer has today a unique global reputation and appeal. And when we consider the evidence that justifies his claims, we must admit that this...
  • Mortal Coils
    Column
    December 07, 2018

    Mortal Coils

    Homosexuals make up two-to-four percent of the population, yet many assume their number is higher, much higher: 23 percent, according to a 2015 Gallup poll. It’s easy to understand why.
  • Reform Now!
    Editorials
    December 07, 2018

    Reform Now!

    The left can nearly always be relied upon to recognize a new and unprecedented situation when it arises, and to propose that it be met resolutely and “creatively,” as it likes to say. The exceptions come when holding fast to the status quo and...
  • A Foreign-Policy Quagmire
    Editorials
    December 07, 2018

    A Foreign-Policy Quagmire

    Foreign policy has been a stumbling block to Democrats for fully 50 years now. In 1968, the party of Lyndon Johnson was the party of the Vietnam War, and replacing Johnson with Hubert Humphrey at the top of the ticket that November was not...
  • Not Prudent at That Juncture
    Editorials
    December 07, 2018

    Not Prudent at That Juncture

    Following the death of President George Herbert Walker Bush at age 94, the mainstream press and the television punditariat began treating the occasion as the passing of America’s grandpa.
  • Deal or No Deal
    Column
    December 07, 2018

    Deal or No Deal

    David Cameron, the former Prime Minister, once mocked his fellow Tories for “banging on about Europe.” He meant that the European Union had become a tedious right-wing obsession—the root of all governmental problems, the enemy without, the...
  • Degenerate <em>Homo</em>
    Column
    December 07, 2018

    Degenerate Homo

    Let’s begin 2019 with some truths and a few admissions: We humans have been evolving for some time now, but not really. Only a few decades ago we were certain that the oldest human fossil was a small-brained female by the name of Lucy.
  • May, Macron—TRUMP
    Editorials
    December 07, 2018

    May, Macron—TRUMP

    Immediately after Emmanuel Macron was elected president of France in May 2017, progressive Americans fairly swooned with envy. If only they could have a president like M. Macron: young, handsome, progressive, cosmopolitan, polished, globally...
  • Seize No Day
    In Our Time
    December 07, 2018

    Seize No Day

    When one is tired of London, said Dr. Johnson, one is tired of life. I spent a week in London last November, a city I have visited many times and know well having lived a year there with my family while I was growing up.
  • Africa: The Wind of Change
    Views
    December 07, 2018

    Africa: The Wind of Change

    “A Manifesto for Renewing Liberalism” is the title of a recent issue (September 13, 2018) of the house journal of liberalism, The Economist. I read this confessional admission with amazement.
  • Clashes of Cultures
    Correspondence
    December 07, 2018

    Clashes of Cultures

    Events this past week in Paris remind me of my step-sister Amanda, Lady Harlech, who is usually described—much to her chagrin—as the “muse” of the 85-year-old gay kaiser of the fashion world, Karl Lagerfeld.
  • #MeToo: Stalinism in Drag
    Society & Culture
    December 07, 2018

    #MeToo: Stalinism in Drag

    We live in a Puritan country, in which self-righteousness is eternally wedded to cheap theatrics. This explains the dual phenomena of Meryl Streep and Hollywood’s earnest commitment to distributing her films to every country on the planet.
  • Lost and Found in America
    Society & Culture
    December 07, 2018

    Lost and Found in America

    One Saturday night last summer I found myself sitting on a warm, grassy knoll outside Missoula, Montana, watching a blood-red sun set behind a cup in the hills with the snow-fringed Bitterroot Mountains beyond, while in the foreground an elfin,...
  • Citizen Sunflower and America’s Future
    Society & Culture
    November 08, 2018

    Citizen Sunflower and America’s Future

    Cancer imposes innumerable indignities on its victims. In addition to possible death, the disease, its complications, and its treatment also force patients through the most inhumane gauntlet of our health-care system.
  • Brazil’s Exceptional President
    Column
    November 08, 2018

    Brazil’s Exceptional President

    Jair Bolsonaro won the presidential election in Brazil on October 28 with 55 percent of the vote. The former army captain triumphed over Fernando Haddad of the leftist Workers’ Party pledging to fight crime and corruption, to end affirmative...
  • Too Dangerous to Read
    Column
    November 08, 2018

    Too Dangerous to Read

    I offer a moral dilemma. Are there books or fictional works so dangerous that they should not be taught in school or college, and that should as far as possible be kept from a general audience?
  • The Boot-Licker
    Column
    November 08, 2018

    The Boot-Licker

    A fifth columnist is a supporter or secret sympathizer of an enemy nation, and the phrase was coined by Spanish nationalist general Emilio Mola.
  • Middle Eastern Blood and Dirt
    Editorials
    November 08, 2018

    Middle Eastern Blood and Dirt

    For over three years Saudi Arabia has been fighting a war in Yemen with little regard for civilian suffering. The war itself has been deadly for thousands of bystanders, but far worse has been the famine the conflict has brought about, which has...
  • Meet the Tiger
    Views
    November 08, 2018

    Meet the Tiger

    “When I was young and stupid,” said George W. Bush, and we have no reason to doubt him on it, “I was young and stupid.” It is a double tautology. He might as well have said, “When I was young,” and left it at that.
  • All the World’s a Migrant Utopia
    Correspondence
    November 08, 2018

    All the World’s a Migrant Utopia

    The writing is at long last on the wall for a world-famous migrant utopia that was founded in a tiny medieval town overlooking the Ionian Sea. It has been a con from start to finish.
  • Blowing for Elkhart
    Correspondence
    November 08, 2018

    Blowing for Elkhart

    Hobbled as I am by residual injury—I wear an ankle brace and limp a bit—and wheeling a large cornet/flugelhorn case, I was grateful when a man much younger than I held open a door for me as I entered the lobby for Elkhart’s Lerner Theatre.
  • Using the N-word
    Column
    November 08, 2018

    Using the N-word

    At a raucous campaign rally in Houston, President Trump laid his ideological cards on the table for all to see. If the Democrats take the House and/or the Senate, he told the crowd, they’ll carry out the agenda of “corrupt, power-hungry globalists.”
  • Lost Generations
    In Our Time
    November 08, 2018

    Lost Generations

    “You are all a lost generation,” Gertrude Stein is said to have told Ernest Hemingway when he and his first wife were living in Paris after the Great War.
  • Christmas in Sodom
    Column
    November 08, 2018

    Christmas in Sodom

    How do you celebrate Christmas in Sodom? I know—it’s not a cheery thought. And by posing the question, I run the risk of anachronism.
  • Quod Scripsi, Scripsi
    Column
    November 08, 2018

    Quod Scripsi, Scripsi

    Words have meaning. We live our lives, for the most part, in a world in which, on a clear spring day, one can say, “The sky is blue,” and everyone else will cheerfully agree (or wonder why you’re bothering to state the obvious).
  • Obama’s Pope
    Reviews
    November 08, 2018

    Obama’s Pope

    Mr. Neumayr’s comprehensive and exhaustive work, a fine example of investigative journalism, should deeply worry Catholics, laity and clerics alike.
  • The Fable of the Glorious
    Reviews
    November 08, 2018

    The Fable of the Glorious

    British journalist Peter Hitchens is a great controversialist. His most famous work remains his 1999 Abolition of Britain, which lamented the decline of Britain since the 1960’s, focusing particularly on the decay of morals and the rise of pop...
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    November 08, 2018

    Books in Brief

    I need to be fair to this book, because the author, a concert pianist and writer who worked for a decade as a classical-music critic for the New York Times, certainly knows her stuff so far as opera goes.
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    November 08, 2018

    What the Editors Are Reading

    Seeking relief from the midterm madness, I’ve been rereading H.L. Mencken’s political reportage and commentary, selections from which have been published in most Mencken anthologies.
  • Sex, Drugs, and Classical Music
    Column
    November 08, 2018

    Sex, Drugs, and Classical Music

    I had long been in search of a pretext for writing a column on sex, drugs, and classical music when I discovered that, by extraordinary coincidence, just such a subtitle adorned Blair Tindall’s memoir, Mozart in the Jungle (2005).
  • The Undaunted
    Column
    November 08, 2018

    The Undaunted

    Chuck Yeager, the much-celebrated Air Force test pilot, derisively referred to NASA’s original astronauts as “spam in a can.” He meant that once these extraordinarily brave men were strapped into their modules, they practically had no agency.
  • Six Midterm Reflections
    Editorials
    November 08, 2018

    Six Midterm Reflections

    As the Midterm Election returns came in, one thing became clear: There would be no “blue wave.” The Democrats secured the House of Representatives, though not by a wide margin, and the Republicans held the Senate, gaining a few seats.
  • The Mightiest Midterm Win
    Editorials
    November 08, 2018

    The Mightiest Midterm Win

    As the Midterm Apocalypse was sliced and diced on the Day After, pundits noted the “Kavanaugh Effect,” whereby Senate Democrats who joined in the smear-and-delay campaign against then-nominee Brett Kavanaugh lost their bids for reelection in...
  • Out of Troy
    Reviews
    November 08, 2018

    Out of Troy

    Author of several novels and a memorable autobiographical work entitled Our Father’s Fields (1998), as well as a leading light of the Abbeville Institute, James Kibler has produced in the present work an indispensable study of the classical...
  • Butch Cassidy, Part 2
    Column
    November 08, 2018

    Butch Cassidy, Part 2

    A station agent tried to telegraph Price, Utah—the direction the outlaws were headed—but Butch Cassidy and Elzy Lay had cut the wires. The paymaster had the train’s engine uncoupled.
  • What Leads to What
    Reviews
    October 11, 2018

    What Leads to What

    When Adam Tooze’s latest book, Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World, hit bookstores this past August, I suggested I review it to Chilton. He immediately agreed. Within days the gargantuan review copy landed with a thud...
  • Obsession!
    Reviews
    October 11, 2018

    Obsession!

    Reading Ann Coulter’s newest polemical masterpiece brings to mind one of her previous ones. I don’t mean her sparkling In Trump We Trust, published just before the 2016 election (and reviewed in this magazine), in which she predicted that the...
  • A Matter of Necessity
    Reviews
    October 11, 2018

    A Matter of Necessity

    God, War, and Providence approaches the story of Roger Williams by exploring the relationship between Puritan Massachusetts and Williams’s Rhode Island, and the relations both colonies had with the Indian tribes inhabiting these regions.
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    October 11, 2018

    What the Editors Are Reading

    As a means to a brief escape from the (so far) miserable 21st century I picked up and began reading The Reason Why, an excellent work of nonacademic history published in 1953 by Cecil Woodham-Smith . . .
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    October 11, 2018

    Books in Brief

    Not only is Father Rutler one of the most brilliant priests in the country; he is also one of the finest writers of the English language today.
  • Trump’s Doctrinal Problem
    Column
    October 11, 2018

    Trump’s Doctrinal Problem

    President Donald Trump’s speech to the U.N. General Assembly on September 25 was met with audible disrespect from some of the assembled globalist cognoscenti (representatives of many barbarous regimes included), and with blind hostility from the...
  • A Moment of Anticipation
    Column
    October 11, 2018

    A Moment of Anticipation

    Are we tired of winning yet? This is the question Donald Trump kept telling us we’d be asking ourselves if he succeeded in taking the White House—and I have to confess the answer is an emphatic “No!”
  • Thanks, Christine
    Column
    October 11, 2018

    Thanks, Christine

    The ugliness displayed by the media and Democrats during the fight over Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court is yet another indicator of how far we have come from Hamilton’s conception of the federal judiciary as “the least...
  • A Tour of Overtures
    Column
    October 11, 2018

    A Tour of Overtures

    We somehow owe it to ourselves to contemplate the useful word sinfonia, one that once denoted the overture to an opera and suggested a pleasing combination of sounds. So yes—the term that denotes the tradition of symphony is derived from another...
  • Lilliputian Fantasies
    Column
    October 11, 2018

    Lilliputian Fantasies

    I’m late commenting on Alexander Payne’s Downsizing for the simple reason that the film became all but unavailable within what seemed a couple of weeks of its opening in December 2017.
  • Tears for Fears
    Editorials
    October 11, 2018

    Tears for Fears

    “A good name is rather to be chosen than great riches,” said wise King Solomon. In the fall of 2018, Democrats pressed with all their might to take Brett Kavanaugh’s good name away, in an effort to retake control of Congress.
  • Cradle of Empire
    Editorials
    October 11, 2018

    Cradle of Empire

    As of October, the U.S. has been fighting a war in Afghanistan for fully 17 years. Young men who were not even born when the war started are now almost of an age to serve and be deployed.
  • Defying the Determinists
    Editorials
    October 11, 2018

    Defying the Determinists

    President Donald Trump is unique among post-NAFTA presidents for rejecting the economic determinism that has dominated U.S. economic policy since 1993.
  • From Silent Sam to Screaming Selfies
    Correspondence
    October 11, 2018

    From Silent Sam to Screaming Selfies

    In the wake of the August 20 toppling of Silent Sam, a monument to North Carolina students who volunteered to become Confederate soldiers in 1861-65, our television screens were filled with images of scraggly, rough-bearded Millennial men and...
  • A Generation in Need of Editing
    Column
    October 11, 2018

    A Generation in Need of Editing

    As I noted last month, conservatives in the United States have long ceded the realms of literature and art (here broadly construed to include all forms of imaginative media, including music, theater, and film) to the forces of the left.
  • The Patriot
    Correspondence
    October 11, 2018

    The Patriot

    Italian journalists are forbidden these days from using the Italian word for foreign migrants who have stolen their way by subterfuge into Italy. By controlling which words people can use you can control their thought. It is a thoroughly fascist...
  • American Babel
    Society & Culture
    October 11, 2018

    American Babel

    Back in June, a belligerent New York City attorney briefly became a symbol of “xenophobia” for those who make it their business to deconstruct what’s left of American identity.
  • Our Inner Mason-Dixon
    Society & Culture
    October 11, 2018

    Our Inner Mason-Dixon

    About a hundred years before the Civil War, two British surveyors, Jeremiah Mason and Charles Dixon, with a crew of ax-men, marked out 270 miles of wilderness. They set a stone at every mile, and another grander one embossed with the arms of the...
  • Vengeance Is Mine, Saith Ms. Jeong
    In Our Time
    October 11, 2018

    Vengeance Is Mine, Saith Ms. Jeong

    In Europe some time during the 17th and 18th centuries the class of people who were known after 1789 as “the left” made the shocking discovery that the world is not perfect: not even all it might be but should be and, indeed, can be.
  • Age of the F-Bomb
    Views
    October 11, 2018

    Age of the F-Bomb

    The suppression of manners and the power of the halfwit elite
  • Campaigning for Narcissists
    Society & Culture
    October 11, 2018

    Campaigning for Narcissists

    On even-numbered years, particularly the ones coinciding with a presidential midterm, my Deep South home county undergoes the grotesque onslaught of local elections.
  • Existential Threat
    Column
    October 11, 2018

    Existential Threat

    At present, two themes dominate British political news. One is Brexit, which never ends. The other is antisemitism in the Labour Party, which sucks up enormous amounts of media oxygen. It is not clear how much the public cares that much about...
  • Kavanaugh in Retrospect
    Editorials
    October 11, 2018

    Kavanaugh in Retrospect

    Hours after the U.S. Senate voted to confirm Judge Kavanaugh as the 114th Supreme Court Justice, a commentator on FOX News remarked that no winners had emerged from the legislative ordeal.
  • Double-Blind in Academia
    Society & Culture
    September 06, 2018

    Double-Blind in Academia

    There are many ways to commit suicide in academia today. Bret Weinstein, a biology professor at Evergreen State College, opted not to take part in the school’s annual “Day of Absence” celebration.
  • Egon Richard Tausch, R.I.P.
    In Memoriam
    September 06, 2018

    Egon Richard Tausch, R.I.P.

    Chronicles has lost a longtime writer and friend, Egon Richard Tausch, who passed away on July 27. In Egon was found both brilliance and humility, a rare combination reflecting his Christian faith.
  • Stepping Up to the Plate
    Column
    September 06, 2018

    Stepping Up to the Plate

    At the end of Garet Garrett’s Rise of Empire, the grizzled old prophet of the dystopia we’re living in held out hope to his conservative comrades and their intellectual descendants.
  • The Legacy of Leon Redbone
    Column
    September 06, 2018

    The Legacy of Leon Redbone

    Leon Redbone left the scene in 2015—I don’t mean that he expired, but simply that he retired. There was mention at the time of health concerns, but he was through with television appearances and concerts and touring, and with recording as well.
  • Butch Cassidy, Part 1
    Column
    September 06, 2018

    Butch Cassidy, Part 1

    Starring Paul Newman and Robert Redford, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid was a smash success when it was released in 1969. Surprisingly, the movie generally follows the actual events of Butch Cassidy’s outlaw life.
  • Racing
    Column
    September 06, 2018

    Racing

    Spike Lee’s latest film, BlacKkKlansman, is an adaptation of Ron Stallworth’s memoir of his experiences as Colorado Springs’ first black policeman in 1972. As you might imagine his tenure was not without its trials.
  • The Angry Summer
    Views
    September 06, 2018

    The Angry Summer

    According to the Washington Post, McAllen, Texas is an “all-American city,” albeit one “that speaks Spanish.” So it’s small wonder that “immigration isn’t a problem for this Texas town—it’s a way of life.”
  • The Catfish Binary, Part 2
    Column
    September 06, 2018

    The Catfish Binary, Part 2

    Aquaculture—farming water for food as opposed to fishing it—is as old as civilization. The Romans did it; so did Mrs. Martin Luther. But catfish farming is an American industry, something of a native-born wonder.
  • Acts of God and Others
    Correspondence
    September 06, 2018

    Acts of God and Others

    The collapse of the Morandi Bridge in Genoa on the motorway that links Italy to Monte Carlo and the French Riviera reminds me of one of the great American novels: The Bridge of San Luis Rey.
  • An American Non-Hero
    Column
    September 06, 2018

    An American Non-Hero

    Sen. John McCain’s death at 81 on August 25 was followed by effusive praise from everyone who is anyone in the Permanent State. His memorial service at Washington’s National Cathedral on September 1 confirmed that, inside the Beltway, even death...
  • The Enemy of the People
    In Our Time
    September 06, 2018

    The Enemy of the People

    Of all the epithets Donald Trump has delivered over the last 24 months (“Mexican immigrant thieves and rapists,” “shithole countries,” the “Mueller Witch Hunt,” etc.), none has provoked greater outrage on the part of liberals than his...
  • The Establishment
    Correspondence
    September 06, 2018

    The Establishment

    We need a word for the forces that govern our lives. Establishment, a term popularized by Henry Fairlie in the 1950’s, is common currency. He meant by it “the whole matrix of official and social relationships within which power is exercised.”
  • Chewing the Toad
    Society & Culture
    September 06, 2018

    Chewing the Toad

    There’s a sucker born every minute. For just $99.00 and a used ticket stub for Wonder Woman, if you order by midnight tonight, you can enroll in a course on Healing Toxic Whiteness.
  • What Really Happened
    Reviews
    September 06, 2018

    What Really Happened

    I call 2016 the Chronicles Election. The issues discussed in this magazine, often a lonely voice in the wilderness, for more than 30 years finally caught up with the national political discourse and got a president elected.
  • “Yet Britain Set the World Ablaze . . . ”
    Reviews
    September 06, 2018

    “Yet Britain Set the World Ablaze . . . ”

    The untidy title—the “century” is really a century-and-a-bit—signals the complexity of that far-off, still close country so sentimentalized by the right and impugned by the left.
  • Not Just Any Book
    Reviews
    September 06, 2018

    Not Just Any Book

    Two questions immediately suggest themselves regarding this work: Who was (or is) Pandora (and her box), and do we really need yet another book on World War I, detailing its causes, alliances, generals, battles—replete with maps, photos, charts...
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    September 06, 2018

    Books in Brief

    The author is chief executive of Humanists UK, president of the International Humanist and Ethical Union, and a former director of the European Humanist Foundation.
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    September 06, 2018

    What the Editors Are Reading

    Ortega y Gasset (1883-1955) was one of the most important philosophers and authors of the 20th century. Camus called him, “after Nietzsche, . . . perhaps the greatest ‘European writer.’”
  • Drain the Swamp
    Column
    September 06, 2018

    Drain the Swamp

    The most remarkable aspect of Bruce Springsteen’s performance at the 2018 Tony Awards wasn’t what he said or that he said it, but the unanimous acclaim with which it was greeted by both the assembled audience and those who viewed it at home.
  • More Crime, Fewer Cops
    Column
    September 06, 2018

    More Crime, Fewer Cops

    Some of you oldsters will never believe this, but London is no longer the place where The Blue Lamp and other black-and-white golden oldies were made.
  • The Church Afire
    Editorials
    September 06, 2018

    The Church Afire

    As of the start of September, it seemed no week was complete without another scandal breaking within the Church of Rome, considered by Her members to be the Mystical Body of Christ.
  • No Free Ride for Bezos Socialism
    Editorials
    September 06, 2018

    No Free Ride for Bezos Socialism

    Imagine an economic system in which government pays the wages of workers, but the businesses where they work remain privately owned, and profits accrue to the owners. Could this fairly be called free-market capitalism?
  • Capitol Obsequies
    Editorials
    September 06, 2018

    Capitol Obsequies

    It used to be said of the Anglican Church that it was “the Tory Party at prayer.” On the occasion of Sen. John McCain’s funeral service in Washington National Cathedral last September 1, the United States and the world were given another...
  • The Voice of Democracy
    Editorials
    September 06, 2018

    The Voice of Democracy

    “Democracy Dies in Darkness,” declares the Washington Post. With apologies to Alexis de Tocqueville, I reply: Doesn’t something have to live first before it can die?
  • What Good Poetry Can Be
    Editorials
    September 06, 2018

    What Good Poetry Can Be

    A long and distinguished literary career ended on June 23, 2018, with the death of New England poet Donald Hall. A versatile and prolific author, he served in 2006-07 as poet laureate of the United States.
  • Selling Them the Rope
    Society & Culture
    August 09, 2018

    Selling Them the Rope

    The United States recently came under an attack by an activity so insidious that Democratic leader Chuck Schumer and his Wisconsin colleague Tammy Baldwin joined forces in an effort to demand it be “reined in.”
  • Teddy Wilson and the Swing Era Vocalists
    Society & Culture
    August 09, 2018

    Teddy Wilson and the Swing Era Vocalists

    Midway through Billie Holiday’s plaintive 1941 recording of “Jim,” there is a short piano solo barely 25 seconds in length—not even a full 32-bar chorus—by Teddy Wilson.
  • Foregone Conclusions
    Column
    August 09, 2018

    Foregone Conclusions

    Here’s a question for you: Could the “monster” of the #MeToo movement get a fair trial anywhere in these United States? Is there a potential jury member that has not made up his mind that Harvey Weinstein raped, mistreated, and oppressed women?
  • Teddy Rebel in Portland
    Editorials
    August 09, 2018

    Teddy Rebel in Portland

    The political establishment in California has become self-admittedly secessionist in recent months, rebelling specifically against federal immigration policy and more broadly by raising the possibility of leaving a backward and reactionary...
  • The Death Penalty Is Good
    Editorials
    August 09, 2018

    The Death Penalty Is Good

    Pope Francis is wrong to change the Catechism of the Catholic Church to suit his postmodern, antibiblical leanings, making capital punishment utterly “inadmissible” in civil society, like hearsay evidence in court.
  • Ask Jeeves
    Reviews
    August 09, 2018

    Ask Jeeves

    Some of the best-loved characters in English literature are observed only dimly through the eyes of an unreliable first-person narrator; like fish seen through the glass of a tank, they swim toward us, momentarily dazzling in their colors, before...
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    August 09, 2018

    What the Editors Are Reading

    Every morning I go through the New York Times (faster and more selectively with each week that passes), the (London) Daily Telegraph, and Le Figaro (it has some strong conservative writers, like Luc Ferry, and interesting essays and well-done...
  • Fascism, Real and Imagined
    Views
    August 09, 2018

    Fascism, Real and Imagined

    Twenty years ago I somehow managed to get my act together and get out of Paris, where I had haunted a cheap hotel for a year in the wake of the death of Princess Diana like the ghost of the Marlon Brando character in Last Tango in Paris.
  • I Hate
    In Our Time
    August 09, 2018

    I Hate

    A book faces me across the room from a bookcase in my office. It has a blood-red and black cover. The author’s name is printed in black down the upper part of the spine and the title in white below that.
  • The Ethnic Partitioning of England
    Correspondence
    August 09, 2018

    The Ethnic Partitioning of England

    Londonistan: The content is in the book’s title. Melanie Phillips, the author, had great difficulty in finding a publisher; no main house would take it, even though she is a distinguished and successful writer, and in the end it came out in 2006...
  • The Battle for America’s Mind
    Society & Culture
    August 09, 2018

    The Battle for America’s Mind

    Heralding the rise of the daily newspaper in 1831, French poet and politician Alphonse de Lamartine declared journalism would emerge as “the whole of human thought,” but that thought itself “will not have time to ripen, to accumulate into the...
  • An Unsatisfying Quexit
    Column
    August 09, 2018

    An Unsatisfying Quexit

    The first problem with Brexit is the word Brexit—one of those stupid portmanteau words, like motel or brunch. It is a joined-up abbreviation of “Britain’s” and “exit from the European Union.”
  • After Helsinki: A Coup in the Making
    Column
    August 09, 2018

    After Helsinki: A Coup in the Making

    President Donald Trump’s meeting with President Vladimir Putin of Russia and their joint press conference in Helsinki on July 16 have ignited an ongoing paroxysm of rage and hysteria in the U.S. media.
  • Schizophrenic Citizens
    Column
    August 09, 2018

    Schizophrenic Citizens

    The very idea of dual citizenship is downright absurd. It’s a contradiction that cannot be resolved. The concept of citizenship is based on the expectation of loyalty to the country, and this, in turn, means that citizens owe their exclusive...
  • A View From Across the Pond
    Reviews
    August 09, 2018

    A View From Across the Pond

    If ever there was a democratic election in a giant modern nation-state, it was Donald J. Trump’s victory in 2016. And I’ve closely watched every presidential election since I was nine in 1964, when Lyndon Johnson lied his way to a landslide...
  • A Man of Inaction
    Reviews
    August 09, 2018

    A Man of Inaction

    In 1912, at dusk walking home, Henry Adams spotted something he thought to be a hippopotamus in the nation’s capital. As he drew nearer he saw it was President Taft.
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    August 09, 2018

    Books in Brief

    In 1935, as president of France, Pierre Laval banned “weapons of war” and decreed that all firearms should be registered with the government.
  • The Last of the Royals
    Column
    August 09, 2018

    The Last of the Royals

    When historians survey Europe’s 20th century, rarely do they question the fundamental evil of the old irrelevant monarchies and aristocratic regimes, and the obvious necessity of replacing them with progressive socialist and nationalist...
  • Claude Polin: A Remembrance
    In Memoriam
    August 09, 2018

    Claude Polin: A Remembrance

    My wife and I shall visit Paris again this fall, as we have done for years, but the city will be an empty place for us following the death of our dear friend and my revered colleague, Claude Polin, on July 23.
  • The Pavarotti Effect
    Column
    August 09, 2018

    The Pavarotti Effect

    I have been told that there is something called the “Pavarotti Effect,” and that this phenomenon is observable and definable. Perhaps sometimes the Pavarotti Effect was an affect, or perhaps it was subsumed by the “Superstar Effect,” as Sherwin...
  • Desperate Fatties
    Column
    August 09, 2018

    Desperate Fatties

    This month we have two—you’ll excuse the expression—art-house films: You Were Really Never Here and Tully. Both feature actors—Joaquin Phoenix and Charlize Theron—who heroically gained 50 pounds to play their roles.
  • Steeling Ourselves for the Future
    Editorials
    August 09, 2018

    Steeling Ourselves for the Future

    Many a new genre of journalism has sprung up thanks to President Trump. The latest is the “victims of tariffs” industry profile.
  • Uber Über Odor
    Society & Culture
    July 12, 2018

    Uber Über Odor

    My wife and I obey a simple rule regarding our leisure travel: She makes the plans; I follow them. Since she enjoys researching hotels and locations, and my tastes overlap with hers, we find it easier for her to do all the planning without any...
  • Erdogan Unleashed
    Column
    July 12, 2018

    Erdogan Unleashed

    A successful national leader (“good” or “bad”) is able to redefine the terms of what is politically possible in accordance with his values, and to produce durable desired outcomes. Lincoln, FDR, and Reagan come to mind at home, and Churchill, De...
  • Simon Pure and Impure
    Column
    July 12, 2018

    Simon Pure and Impure

    The other day I came across the pianist Simon Barere on YouTube, and I was glad to see him there—the recognition he has received is certainly deserved, though it is hard to know what would be the appropriate reward to a performer who never got...
  • The Libertarian Trajectory
    Editorials
    July 12, 2018

    The Libertarian Trajectory

    NeverTrump really means “forever war.” Proof of this could be seen in the 2016 election, where anti-Trump Republicans fielded a candidate of their own, ex-CIA man Evan McMullin, rather than casting their votes for a third-party ticket with two...
  • The Partisans Are Coming!
    Editorials
    July 12, 2018

    The Partisans Are Coming!

    The Referendum that took Great Britain out of the European Union by a large popular majority occurred two years ago. President Trump was elected two years ago this coming November in something like a landslide in the Electoral College.
  • The Children of Eden
    Views
    July 12, 2018

    The Children of Eden

    All of us, I imagine, are granted from time to time moments of uninvited insight that will, for years to come, provide a basis for reflection and a more penetrating glimpse of the forces that shape the realms in which we live and labor.
  • Fighting for Their Homeland
    Correspondence
    July 12, 2018

    Fighting for Their Homeland

    South Africa has rarely been out of the headlines in 2018. In late February, the South African government voted to amend the constitution to allow for the expropriation of land from white farmers without compensation.
  • American Shakespeare
    Correspondence
    July 12, 2018

    American Shakespeare

    Shakespeare contains the cultural history of America. From first to last, Shakespeare is the graph of evolving American values. He early made the transatlantic crossing: It is thought that Cotton Mather was the first in America to acquire a...
  • Catch, Release, Repeat
    Column
    July 12, 2018

    Catch, Release, Repeat

    The photo went viral: a little girl crying after she’d been separated from her mother at the U.S.-Mexican border. Time photoshopped it so that the little girl was crying while the Evil Donald Trump looked down at her, looming over her like some...
  • The Presidential Style
    In Our Time
    July 12, 2018

    The Presidential Style

    “Never lose your temper except on purpose” was a firm maxim of Dwight Eisenhower’s. Donald Trump seems generally to observe the same rule, though certainly not always.
  • Hungry Heart
    Column
    July 12, 2018

    Hungry Heart

    The Hollywood elite has been painfully boring and predictable for decades, and the use of awards ceremonies to deliver political messages is nothing new. But like everything else in the Age of Trump (with the exception of civility), this...
  • The Truth About Hungary
    Reviews
    July 12, 2018

    The Truth About Hungary

    I met Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbàn in May of last year. With a few others, we shared breakfast before the opening session of the second Budapest Demographic Forum. He was every bit the “footballer” I had been told to expect.
  • Law and Liberty
    Reviews
    July 12, 2018

    Law and Liberty

    Let’s say that a state passed a statute proscribing teachers from teaching reading in a language other than English until the student had passed the eighth grade. Violation of the statute was a misdemeanor.
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    July 12, 2018

    Books in Brief

    Mark Atkins describes himself as a “failed Marine” who has never been in combat and who writes “with the same authority as that little boy who cried, “The Emperor has no clothes!” He is also a businessman who is fully aware that he is neither a...
  • From Russia, With Love­—and Hate
    Correspondence
    July 12, 2018

    From Russia, With Love­—and Hate

    Russian sexuality and the country’s general mores have become a topic of conversation in the United States, mostly in relation to President Trump’s alleged connections with the Kremlin and his behavior during his trip to Russia some time ago,...
  • In Praise of Cultural Appropriation
    Society & Culture
    July 12, 2018

    In Praise of Cultural Appropriation

    Recently I read of a 67-year-old woman who wanted to run in a marathon. She had never run for exercise in her life, but her desire and passion led her to put on a pair of sneakers, leave the house, and walk a mile.
  • The Catfish Binary, Part 1
    Column
    July 12, 2018

    The Catfish Binary, Part 1

    Summer is the time for lazy fishing in the hot sun. That calls for a fish story. And what follows is no tall tale, although I think the moral of the story is quite significant. For I am now willing to say, without exaggeration, that catfish...
  • Britons at War
    Reviews
    July 12, 2018

    Britons at War

    Is there a distinctly British brand of heroism? That is the implicit question running through Christopher Sandford’s Zeebrugge, a gripping new history of the British naval raid in April 1918 on the German-held Belgian port of that name.
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    July 12, 2018

    What the Editors Are Reading

    When the review copy of A Savage War of Peace: Algeria 1954-1962, by Alistair Horne, hit my desk at National Review in 1977, I found a reviewer immediately and waited for a second copy to follow from the publisher (as is so often the case in the...
  • Ministering
    Column
    July 12, 2018

    Ministering

    Fashionable reviewers have brought out the heavy artillery to praise director Paul Schrader’s latest film, First Reformed, calling it transcendent, uncompromising, soaring, etc, etc. Maybe they saw a different film from the dank, pretentious one...
  • David Crockett
    Column
    July 12, 2018

    David Crockett

    “Watch what people are cynical about,” said General Patton, “and one can often discover what they lack.” Since the 1960’s I’ve been watching what are often called revisionist historians trying to destroy the American heroes I grew up admiring.
  • Aegean Idyll
    Column
    July 12, 2018

    Aegean Idyll

    August is the time for cruising. Once upon a time, cruising the Med was fun, especially around the French Riviera. Now the sea is full of garbage, the ports packed with horror megayachts owned by horrid Arabs and eastern oligarch gangsters,...
  • Kavanaugh and the Roe Dance
    Editorials
    July 12, 2018

    Kavanaugh and the Roe Dance

    Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination by President Trump for the blessed vacancy left by retiring justice Anthony Kennedy, author of the civilization-defying Obergefell opinion, supplied the heat necessary to cause the vaunted American melting pot to boil...
  • Jacob Rees-Mogg’s Conservative Clinic
    Views
    June 07, 2018

    Jacob Rees-Mogg’s Conservative Clinic

    As a political phenomenon, “the Moggster,” as he is known, is quite Trumpian. He is wildly popular in a way that the experts cannot understand. As Trump was in 2015, he is dismissed as a ridiculous figure who can’t win.
  • Those Oldies But Goodies
    Column
    June 07, 2018

    Those Oldies But Goodies

    An Italian-American restaurant I count on features sound reasons for my presence there, and that of others. I like the tone in that environment. There is an aspect of 1950’s atmosphere—the place is quiet, the lighting subdued, and the manners...
  • How the Crusades Were Won
    Column
    June 07, 2018

    How the Crusades Were Won

    The Christian Crusades of the Middle Ages are today deployed for a wide range of political and rhetorical purposes—to make claims about the Church’s betrayal of Christ’s teaching, the evils of European imperialism, or the inextricable link...
  • The Unmet Mentor
    Society & Culture
    June 07, 2018

    The Unmet Mentor

    Life changed forever for me and my family on June 19, 2015, when tragedy struck suddenly. In the aftermath, I turned to an old mentor. In the ashes of our loss and dismal emptiness, I opened A Grief Observed, by C.S. Lewis. The first...
  • The Politics of Morbid Fascination
    Society & Culture
    June 07, 2018

    The Politics of Morbid Fascination

    Rafael Palmeiro has ED. How do I know? He told me. He told you, too. Heck, he told the whole country about 15 years ago. He went on national television to say that he was having a bit of trouble with his slugging percentage, and that Viagra...
  • Neocons in the Dark
    Column
    June 07, 2018

    Neocons in the Dark

    Republican politicians are all Trumpier-than-thou these days, if they know what’s good for them. The GOP wing of the “Resistance,” represented by Jeff Flake and Bob Corker, are retiring from the field, defeated.
  • Darwinian Liberalism
    In Our Time
    June 07, 2018

    Darwinian Liberalism

    A brief article in The Spectator (May 19) by Fredrik Erixon speculates that President Emmanuel Macron of France, generally considered a liberal centrist énarque, seems to be reconsidering his position following the anniversary of his first year...
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    June 07, 2018

    Books in Brief

    Theodore Roosevelt always considered himself a man of letters, and indeed he was one. He began reading widely and writing at an early age, and a day never seems to have passed when he did not read and write, even in circumstances fiercely...
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    June 07, 2018

    What the Editors Are Reading

    Ross Douthat, who converted to Catholicism as a teenager, performed a great service to the Church when he wrote To Change the Church, his assessment of Pope Francis’s pontificate thus far.
  • The Essential Sector
    Column
    June 07, 2018

    The Essential Sector

    One of Donald Trump’s signature issues during the presidential campaign was his assertion that bad trade deals had cost millions of American manufacturing jobs, and his promise to do something to reverse that doleful trend.
  • Trump’s Iranian Gamble
    Column
    June 07, 2018

    Trump’s Iranian Gamble

    The conventional view among antiglobalist conservatives is that President Donald Trump’s nixing of the Iran nuclear deal, coupled with the much-heralded relocation of the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem, is bad news.
  • Families
    Column
    June 07, 2018

    Families

    On July 18, 1969, Sen. Edward Kennedy infamously drove off a bridge on Chappaquiddick Island. He had left a late-night party with an aide named Mary Jo Kopechne supposedly to take her to the ferry to Martha’s Vineyard.
  • The Telegraph and the Clothesline
    Column
    June 07, 2018

    The Telegraph and the Clothesline

    Communication, in the abstract, is easier today than it has ever been before, largely because of the advance of technology.
  • The Unhelpful Uncle
    Column
    June 07, 2018

    The Unhelpful Uncle

    I recently had a spirited discussion with the British historian James Holland, brother of Tom Holland, also a distinguished man of letters, about FDR, his oil embargo of Japan, and the root causes of World War II.
  • Immigration and the GOP (Again!)
    Editorials
    June 07, 2018

    Immigration and the GOP (Again!)

    The Republican candidate for President of the United States in 2016 made major immigration restriction the broadest and thickest plank in his platform. That candidate went on to defeat 16 other GOP candidates, all of them to a greater or lesser...
  • Tom Wolfe, R.I.P.
    Editorials
    June 07, 2018

    Tom Wolfe, R.I.P.

    When Tom Wolfe’s debut novel, The Bonfire of the Vanities, was published in November 1987, the book was greeted with effusive praise and became a best-seller, although some literati seemed offended by Wolfe’s highly descriptive prose, the...
  • Faith Whittlesey, R.I.P.
    Editorials
    June 07, 2018

    Faith Whittlesey, R.I.P.

    The mice had a problem with Faith Whittlesey. These mice were not the four-legged kind; they were Chief of Staff Donald Regan’s functionaries in the Reagan White House, scurrying around and gnawing away at conservative policy efforts.
  • The Siege of Sweden
    Correspondence
    June 07, 2018

    The Siege of Sweden

    In an era of political correctness, “safe spaces,” and “trigger warnings” for the constitutionally feeble, there are plenty of things we are not supposed to talk about. Increasingly in recent months, this seems to include crime and immigration...
  • Requiem for a Remainer
    Correspondence
    June 07, 2018

    Requiem for a Remainer

    It is time to ring down the curtain on the troubled rule of Theresa May. May became Prime Minister as the result of a series of flukes, which a scriptwriter would have dismissed as too implausible to work.
  • Jordan Peterson and the Unknown God
    Reviews
    June 07, 2018

    Jordan Peterson and the Unknown God

    To some, Jordan Peterson is a breath of fresh air. To others, a guru. Many find him and his ideas to be dangerous. Still others see him as a sign of the times. In a sense, they’re all right.
  • The Anatomy of Color
    Reviews
    June 07, 2018

    The Anatomy of Color

    History can be refracted through countless prisms—cultural, economic, environmental, ideological, moral, national, racial, religious—but one has been oddly unexplored, despite being not just obvious but ubiquitous.
  • Anglo Magic
    Reviews
    June 07, 2018

    Anglo Magic

    Field of Blood is one of the best new novels I have read in many a year, a superbly written book by a Russian scholar and analyst who is also a careful artist, a stylist, and a poet in prose and in form who has accomplished what few essayists and...
  • Syria and Our Deaths of Despair
    Society & Culture
    May 10, 2018

    Syria and Our Deaths of Despair

    Just two days after the alleged April 9 chemical attack in Douma, Syria, TV host Tucker Carlson asked Mississippi Republican Sen. Roger Wicker, “What is the American national security interest that would be served by regime change in Syria?”
  • Cultural Marxists and the Stranglehold of “Race”
    Society & Culture
    May 10, 2018

    Cultural Marxists and the Stranglehold of “Race”

    One of the subjects that most self-styled conservatives seem incapable of discussing in any depth—indeed, it is one they often flee from like mice before the hungry house cat—is race.
  • One Nation Divided
    In Our Time
    May 10, 2018

    One Nation Divided

    Since 1892, when the original text was composed, the Pledge of Allegiance has been revised three times. Viewed chronologically, the alterations appear to have aimed at a greater specificity, but also a wider and deeper self-assurance.
  • Homesick in America
    Correspondence
    May 10, 2018

    Homesick in America

    “Darlin,’” she said, “I’ll get that. Go ahead and take it.” She was a weathered-looking woman with mousy light brown hair drawn back in a bun and the plain, honest look of one of those faces you see in Depression-era photos from the Dust Bowl,...
  • Syria: A Deep State Victory
    Column
    May 10, 2018

    Syria: A Deep State Victory

    The latest escalation of the Syrian crisis started with the false-flag poison gas attack in Douma on April 7. It was followed a week later by the bombing of three alleged chemical-weapons facilities by the United States, Britain, and France.
  • The Managerial Racket
    Reviews
    May 10, 2018

    The Managerial Racket

    Life in America these days has become a vast numbers racket. That is, most Americans are, cannily or not, ensnared in the numbers game called metrics, or what Jerry Muller in his latest book terms the “metrics fixation.”
  • All About Trump
    Reviews
    May 10, 2018

    All About Trump

    Today, all books by liberals really are about President Trump. Such is Playing With Fire: The 1968 Election and the Transformation of American Politics, by MSNBC far-left fake-news host Lawrence O’Donnell.
  • A Stretch and a Temptation
    Reviews
    May 10, 2018

    A Stretch and a Temptation

    Next year marks the 900th anniversary of Roger of Salerno’s defeat at Ager Sanguinis, the Field of Blood. The battle raged near Sarmada, west of Aleppo, on June 28, 1119. Roger, regent of Antioch (for the child Bohemond II), led his smaller...
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    May 10, 2018

    Books in Brief

    This excellent and timely book is of great interest as informed speculation on the future of the United States; at a secondary level, it is a meditation on empire in history.
  • California Dreaming
    Column
    May 10, 2018

    California Dreaming

    You never know what Lady Fortuna has in store for you next. Having quit college—after all, I knew what I wanted to do, and didn’t need lessons from some hippie in how to do it—I was shuttling between New York City and my parents’ house in the...
  • Parry O’Brien
    Column
    May 10, 2018

    Parry O’Brien

    It’s difficult to explain today that, from the 1920’s through the mid-1960’s, track and field was a major sport in Southern California. There were several reasons for this.
  • Adolf Busch & Colleagues
    Column
    May 10, 2018

    Adolf Busch & Colleagues

    Some two decades ago, I found myself preparing for a trip to Niagara Falls, where I was to meet a lady. I had not been to Niagara Falls before, though I was familiar with the movie Niagara (Hathaway, 1953), which has sometimes been called the...
  • Racial Follies
    Column
    May 10, 2018

    Racial Follies

    I had never heard of the 1957 film Band of Angels directed by Raoul Walsh until I came upon it while sampling YouTube’s holdings. When I saw that it was an adaptation of Robert Penn Warren’s novel of the same title, I decided to give it a try.
  • Iran and Nuclear Hubris
    Editorials
    May 10, 2018

    Iran and Nuclear Hubris

    The “Iran Nuclear Deal” was killed by President Trump on May 8, which came as no surprise to anyone who had heard a Trump campaign speech in 2016 or to those who were aware that Trump had recently hired John Bolton and Mike Pompeo. Surprise or...
  • Calling the Deomocrats’ Bluff
    Editorials
    May 10, 2018

    Calling the Deomocrats’ Bluff

    Rep. Adam Schiff knows something about impeachment. The California Democrat first won his seat in Congress in 2000, when he defeated a Republican incumbent, James Rogan, who two years earlier had been one of the “managers” acting for the House...
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    May 10, 2018

    What the Editors Are Reading

    I discovered only by accident a week ago a little book called Liberalism, by the English philosopher John Gray, published originally in 1986 and in its second edition in 1995.
  • Impossible Dreams: The West’s Undying Love Affair With Marx
    Views
    May 10, 2018

    Impossible Dreams: The West’s Undying Love Affair With Marx

    Is Marxism Dead? If the average citizen of a Western society were asked that question, it seems to me he would readily answer that Marxism is indeed a very dead idea surviving only in improbable boondocks like North Korea or Cuba, and even there...
  • Lessons From Libya: How Not to Ruin Syria
    Society & Culture
    May 10, 2018

    Lessons From Libya: How Not to Ruin Syria

    In the aftermath of the U.S.-led air and missile strikes on Syria for the April incident in which Bashar al-Assad’s government allegedly used chemical weapons against innocent civilians, calls are growing for the Trump administration to deepen...
  • Monumental Stupidity
    Society & Culture
    May 10, 2018

    Monumental Stupidity

    There is a scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1959 classic North by Northwest in which the characters look out at a brooding Mount Rushmore from the dining-room terrace of the Sheraton-Johnson Hotel in Rapid City, South Dakota (since renamed the Hotel...
  • Can We Talk?
    Column
    May 10, 2018

    Can We Talk?

    A few months after we moved to Huntington, Indiana, I was inducted into the Cosmopolitan Club, one of the country’s oldest extant discussion societies. Chartered on January 18, 1894, the Cosmopolitan Club convenes on the fourth Tuesday of every...
  • Nothing to Protest
    Column
    May 10, 2018

    Nothing to Protest

    Bonjour, mes amis! Fifty years ago this month, I was living in Paris, and life was, shall we say, grand. Back then there was nothing like Paris in the spring and early summer, with formal balls galore, polo in the Bois de Boulogne, and...
  • Going in the Wrong Direction
    Editorials
    May 10, 2018

    Going in the Wrong Direction

    Of the more than 1,000 migrants from Central America who set out in “caravan” to traverse the length of Mexico to seek asylum in the United States, a couple of hundred arrived at Tijuana on the American border.
  • Hogging the Guns
    Society & Culture
    April 05, 2018

    Hogging the Guns

    Facts ruin bad arguments. So let these facts sink in for a minute. According to the FBI, in 2016 murderers using handguns killed 7, 105 Americans. That same year, murderers using any kind of rifle killed only 374 Americans.
  • The Lesson From Pennsylvania
    In Our Time
    April 05, 2018

    The Lesson From Pennsylvania

    It’s likely that psephologists will discover from their postmortems on the recent primary election in Pennsylvania’s 18th Congressional District that the barely victorious candidate, Conor Lamb, won by appealing to the “nice” Republican portion...
  • Speaking of Hell
    Column
    April 05, 2018

    Speaking of Hell

    Did Pope Francis deny the existence of Hell? If previous episodes in this pontificate are any guide, those who earnestly seek a definitive answer will likely discover that, much like the natural fate of the Tootsie Pop, the world may never know.
  • The Last Ideology
    Reviews
    April 05, 2018

    The Last Ideology

    “Liberalism has failed,” writes University of Notre Dame political-science professor Patrick Deneen in his new book with a related title. “Nearly every one of the promises . . . made by the architects and creators of liberalism has been...
  • Bannon and the Inquisition
    Column
    April 05, 2018

    Bannon and the Inquisition

    There’s nothing more boring than journalists writing about journalism. Please let me tell you, though, about The Spectator’s interview with Steve Bannon, which we published in March.
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    April 05, 2018

    Books in Brief

    Rémi Brague, the French Catholic historian and political philosopher, made his wider reputation in the early 1990’s with his book Europe, la voie romaine, in which he attempted a sketch of what Europe should be following its reunification after...
  • The Center Doesn’t Hold Here
    Views
    April 05, 2018

    The Center Doesn’t Hold Here

    How do you make sense of New York? There’s lots of intelligence, talent, and ambition here. There’s also a lot of insanity. When Barack Obama won his first presidential election people in my neighborhood partied in the streets all night.
  • March Against Middle America
    Society & Culture
    April 05, 2018

    March Against Middle America

    In March, Americans braced for the nationwide “March for Our Lives,” and what they witnessed was the latest battle in the culture war, with children paraded through the capital as nouveaux Jacobins.
  • Anniversary of the Modern West
    Views
    April 05, 2018

    Anniversary of the Modern West

    Some of the greatest events in human history simply fail to register in popular consciousness. Last year, we rightly heard a terrific amount about the Reformation, or at least, about its early Lutheran phase.
  • Alien Nation
    Column
    April 05, 2018

    Alien Nation

    The idea of a nation (natio) that is rootless—not tied to a particular land (patria)—is an absurdity. It is the flip side of the idea of a “nation of immigrants,” which arose in the late 19th century and took hold on the American imagination...
  • The High Price of Wealth
    Reviews
    April 05, 2018

    The High Price of Wealth

    This is no conspiracy theory. There is no secret group that meets secretly to make secret plans to run the global economy. All is done in the open.
  • Thank You, Auden!
    Reviews
    April 05, 2018

    Thank You, Auden!

    With the publication of volumes V and VI, the Princeton edition of W.H. Auden’s collected prose is complete in almost 5,000 pages, covering over 45 years of a writing life.
  • The Court in Quandary
    Reviews
    April 05, 2018

    The Court in Quandary

    When the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the trial court’s preliminary injunction against President Trump’s executive order restricting immigration from certain countries, it cited Trump’s statements about Islam as its rationale.
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    April 05, 2018

    What the Editors Are Reading

    I have been reading through, here and there at odd moments as I find the time, the Fall/Winter number of The Chesterton Review, generously sent me by Fr. Ian Boyd, C.S.B., the journal’s editor, and designated its Special Journalism Issue.
  • Taiwan, China, and Unnecessary War
    Society & Culture
    April 05, 2018

    Taiwan, China, and Unnecessary War

    While America’s attention remains focused on the North Korea crisis, another dangerous East Asia confrontation has re-emerged. The People’s Republic of China (PRC) is taking new steps to intimidate Taiwan and force the island’s leaders to move...
  • Worse Than a Neocon
    Column
    April 05, 2018

    Worse Than a Neocon

    Until March 22, when the White House announced that John Bolton would replace H.R. McMaster as national security advisor, it was still possible to imagine that President Donald Trump’s many compromises with the globalist-hegemonist establishment...
  • The Liars and the Credulous
    Column
    April 05, 2018

    The Liars and the Credulous

    I am writing this very close to March 20, the 15th anniversary of the start of the Iraq war, and I’m wondering: Have we learned anything from that experience?
  • The Electric Conductor
    Column
    April 05, 2018

    The Electric Conductor

    Back in the day, was there anyone more famous than Arturo Toscanini? Everyone knew who he was, what he did, and what he looked like. He was more famous than Walt Disney and got coverage like a movie star.
  • Bursting the Wineskin
    Column
    April 05, 2018

    Bursting the Wineskin

    Growing up in the 1950’s, I was regaled with many stories about nuns and their punishing ways. Having attended Roman Catholic grammar school through the third grade, I did some regaling myself despite knowing full well that my tales were just...
  • Take Off Your Hat
    Column
    April 05, 2018

    Take Off Your Hat

    I have been a member of a private club up in the Alps since 1959. Its name is the Eagle Ski Club, and I joined it when I was 20 years of age. Sixty years later I’ve resigned as a life member because of an incident I won’t go into, as things...
  • The Logic of Liberalism
    Editorials
    April 05, 2018

    The Logic of Liberalism

    Writing in this issue of Chronicles, Frank Brownlow, the scholar and literary critic, quotes W.H. Auden as having described logic as “a condition of the world,” like aesthetics and ethics. Auden was right, which makes advanced liberalism’s...
  • GOP National Stage Fright
    Editorials
    April 05, 2018

    GOP National Stage Fright

    Democrats are feeling overconfident. They won a hard-fought special election in Pennsylvania’s 18th Congressional District in early March, then saw over a million people take to the streets in cities across the country to march for gun control...
  • All Against Russia
    Editorials
    April 05, 2018

    All Against Russia

    On any subject other than Russia, unanimity between the United States and her European “allies” has been impossible to achieve since Donald Trump was sworn in as President.
  • Our Sanctuary Census
    Editorials
    April 05, 2018

    Our Sanctuary Census

    Paroxysms of liberal outrage gripped denizens of the Swamp when the Commerce Department announced that it plans to find out the citizenship status of U.S. residents by asking them directly via the 2020 Census and the U.S. Mail.
  • Venting Is Not Enough: Nassar and Injustice
    Society & Culture
    March 08, 2018

    Venting Is Not Enough: Nassar and Injustice

    Imagine a justice system that functioned as follows. While awaiting sentencing after conviction, the vilest criminals would be put in the public dock, surrounded by angry spectators.
  • Mencken and After
    Correspondence
    March 08, 2018

    Mencken and After

    If Noah Webster was the father of English-language spelling reform, H.L. Mencken was the strong son making good his inheritance. Mencken’s claim was to be the father of the American language.
  • Large Is Ugly: Why America Is Not a Democracy
    Society & Culture
    March 08, 2018

    Large Is Ugly: Why America Is Not a Democracy

    Of course it is ludicrous for anyone to consider the government in Washington, D.C., a democracy, no matter how often it is declared to be one. The reason is perfectly obvious: With a population of nearly 330 million people, no nation could have...
  • The Pursuit of Happiness
    In Our Time
    March 08, 2018

    The Pursuit of Happiness

    Mass shootings of the sort that happened recently in Florida and Nevada, whose only conceivable motive is the perpetrator’s compulsion to make his satanic and nihilistic hatred of other people and of existence itself a compelling item in the...
  • Immigration and Citizenship: Ancient Lessons for the American People
    Society & Culture
    March 08, 2018

    Immigration and Citizenship: Ancient Lessons for the American People

    Americans have been debating immigration since the Founding era. Congress passed the first Naturalization Law in 1790, which it amended and fine-tuned in 1795, 1798, and 1802.
  • Lies and Consequences
    Column
    March 08, 2018

    Lies and Consequences

    The Post is Steven Spielberg’s account of the Washington Post’s 1971 decision to publish the Robert McNamara-ordered report United States-Vietnam Relations, 1945-1967: A Study Prepared by the Department of Defense.
  • Hang ’Em High
    Column
    March 08, 2018

    Hang ’Em High

    I was recently watching Westward Ho, one of the many dozens of B Westerns I have in my collection, and it struck me that until the 1940’s vigilantes were most often portrayed in the movies as the good guys.
  • Lost Near the Beltway
    Column
    March 08, 2018

    Lost Near the Beltway

    Whatever happened to the libertarian movement? Since the age of 14 I have been a self-conscious libertarian. That’s when I started reading libertarian tracts (Rand, Mises, Hayek).
  • Muslim Migrants and the Religious Left
    Views
    March 08, 2018

    Muslim Migrants and the Religious Left

    Why are so many Western Christians either silent about, or actually complicit in, the Muslim hegira to the West? One would think Christians would be at the forefront of opposition.
  • Hour of Decision
    Column
    March 08, 2018

    Hour of Decision

    Looking objectively at the legacy of Billy Graham in the wake of his passing is virtually impossible, especially for me personally. I know several people who answered the altar call at a Graham crusade, “just as I am without one plea, but that...
  • A Ruthless Charm
    Reviews
    March 08, 2018

    A Ruthless Charm

    Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. was bred in the bone for his role on the stage of 20th-century American history.
  • A Billion Sordid Images
    Reviews
    March 08, 2018

    A Billion Sordid Images

    "Disconnected" is not an amusing book. The subtitle’s “digitally distracted” doesn’t hint at its grim findings. This short text—a long one might be too dispiriting—is nevertheless lengthy enough to expose the digital revolution as an outright...
  • “Only Connect!”
    Reviews
    March 08, 2018

    “Only Connect!”

    Niall Ferguson is a distinguished historian of Scottish origin who specializes in big arguments, and contrarian claims. His books are always provocative, frequently infuriating, and often (if not always) correct in their analyses.
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    March 08, 2018

    What the Editors Are Reading

    Not a find, but an old friend, is Malcolm Muggeridge. I am reading a collection of his essays called Time and Eternity, and his golden spiritual autobiography, Confessions of a Twentieth-Century Pilgrim, written after he and his wife, past their...
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    March 08, 2018

    Books in Brief

    George Liebmann, an attorney and historian, argues that Friedrich Hayek’s definition of the rule of law (“uniform rules laid down in advance”) has not been observed recently by federal and state governments.
  • Fiddling on the Brink
    Column
    March 08, 2018

    Fiddling on the Brink

    A standard theme in the literature on the Great War is that hardly anyone expected it at the time. Europe’s last summer, balmy and idyllic, suddenly brought the guns of August.
  • The Great Clarifier
    Column
    March 08, 2018

    The Great Clarifier

    Not even President Trump’s most ardent admirers would claim that he is a “Great Communicator,” the title bestowed on the last resident of the White House who could plausibly be seen as governing, at least in some respects, as a conservative.
  • The Quest for Community
    Column
    March 08, 2018

    The Quest for Community

    The trouble with labels—whether adopted voluntarily or applied by others—is that they are inherently limiting. Robert Nisbet is often described as a sociologist or a libertarian, and sometimes as a libertarian sociologist, depending on what the...
  • The Lowdown on Music Appreciation
    Column
    March 08, 2018

    The Lowdown on Music Appreciation

    Music Appreciation is a revealing phrase: It doesn’t mean what it says. It doesn’t mean that music is getting more expensive, though it is true that music is appreciating. It doesn’t mean even a proper regard, as in “I appreciate your efforts.”
  • Blame Poland
    Column
    March 08, 2018

    Blame Poland

    OK, all you readers: You are weak, easily manipulated, led by the nose to the gutter, susceptible to the devils of your diabolical urges, and you are crazy. In fact you are the unspeakables, the deplorables who voted for Trump, and a bald, ugly...
  • Tariffs and Delusions
    Editorials
    March 08, 2018

    Tariffs and Delusions

    Lenin may or may not have said that the capitalists would sell him the rope by which he would hang them, but the proverb is assigned to him for good reason. Any revolutionary who dreams of destroying the free-enterprise system can count on a...
  • America’s Death Wish
    Editorials
    March 08, 2018

    America’s Death Wish

    Parkland, Florida, came and went, bringing a new St. Valentine’s Day massacre, another unspeakable horror, and another opportunity for hashtags and political maneuvering over guns in America.
  • The Second Risorgimento
    Editorials
    March 08, 2018

    The Second Risorgimento

    The national Italian elections so feared by Brussels, European liberals, and other would-be unifiers across the Continent have come and gone after having given the officials of the European Union “une mauvaise soirée,” as Marine Le Pen expressed it.
  • An Unexpected Journey
    Society & Culture
    February 08, 2018

    An Unexpected Journey

    I’ve spent the last few months hobbling around Manhattan, one of America’s last walkable cities. In keeping with New Yorkers’ well-deserved stereotype for brusqueness, strangers on the sidewalk frequently ask me, “Why are you limping?”
  • Islam, Europe, and Slavery
    Column
    February 08, 2018

    Islam, Europe, and Slavery

    At Midsummer 1631, Barbary pirates from North Africa raided the Irish village of Baltimore, and took several hundred local people into lifelong captivity. Such a distant projection of Islamic power might seem extreme and even bizarre, but it was...
  • The Two Lhevinnes
    Column
    February 08, 2018

    The Two Lhevinnes

    Though too many years have gone by since I last crossed paths with Robert K. Wallace, that doesn’t mean I have forgotten that gifted and accomplished man.
  • Trump’s Understatement
    Column
    February 08, 2018

    Trump’s Understatement

    Gee, this is the worst news I’ve had since the defeat at Stalingrad. More than 80 former ambassadors to African nations sent a letter of protest to The Donald. Even worse, Botswana, Ghana, Haiti, Namibia, Senegal, and the African Union have all...
  • A Song That Will Linger
    Polemics & Exchanges
    February 08, 2018

    A Song That Will Linger

    Since he is my favorite American composer, I appreciated James O. Tate’s discussion of the music of Stephen Foster (“My Old Kentucky Home, Good Night!,” The Music Column, January), and thereby discovered the fine music offered by Thomas Hampson...
  • New Light on the Lakes
    Correspondence
    February 08, 2018

    New Light on the Lakes

    We had been dreaming about Andalusia. But plans sometimes must be altered, and so one August evening we found ourselves instead entering into Ulverston, 1,300 miles from Andalusia, and even more distant climatically, culturally, and historically.
  • A Wrinkle in Time
    Column
    February 08, 2018

    A Wrinkle in Time

    I took the diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (Stage 4) quite well, I thought. Except for occasional bouts of hysterical self-pity and thankfully rare gestures of melodrama.
  • Tucker Carlson’s “Change of Heart”: The Chronicles Interview
    Interview
    February 08, 2018

    Tucker Carlson’s “Change of Heart”: The Chronicles Interview

    From his perch at FOX News, Tucker Carlson was beating back criticism from liberals and neoconservatives at the same time. The subject was immigration.
  • Is Trump “Normal”?
    Editorials
    February 08, 2018

    Is Trump “Normal”?

    The debate regarding President Trump’s sanity is echoed at a slightly less hyperbolic level by liberals’ fervent insistence that he is “not a normal president.” What, exactly, does this mean?
  • An Honest Reckoning
    Editorials
    February 08, 2018

    An Honest Reckoning

    John le Carré could hardly imagine a better scenario: a spy-for-hire—once a servant of Her Majesty’s government, now selling his services in a foreign market—takes payouts from two masters simultaneously, as both a police informant and a...
  • Will Democrats Learn?
    Editorials
    February 08, 2018

    Will Democrats Learn?

    Year after year, a president gives a State of the Union Address, and year after year the minority party’s response is predictably awful.
  • Crashing Under the Fourth Wave
    Column
    February 08, 2018

    Crashing Under the Fourth Wave

    Professional Democrats, like the proverbial dog who returns to his vomit, cannot quit the idea that their grotesque caricatures of those who hold traditional views of marriage and family, men and women, borders and citizenship, and meaningful...
  • “Little Democracies”: The Disunification of Italy
    Correspondence
    February 08, 2018

    “Little Democracies”: The Disunification of Italy

    I’ve been sent on a fool’s errand: to explain Italian politics. As those of you who have spent extended periods of time in the “Mediterranean boot” know, this is a challenging task.
  • Politics Is Policy
    Reviews
    February 08, 2018

    Politics Is Policy

    “Drain the swamp!” Donald Trump declared in every campaign speech of 2016. He meant, of course, the Swamp of Washington, D.C., home of the labyrinthine network of centralized bureaucracies that control our lives. It’s also called the Deep State...
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    February 08, 2018

    What the Editors Are Reading

    Outside of my regular reading for the courses I’m teaching—this semester, this week, Livy’s History of Rome, Books 1-5, and Spenser’s The Faerie Queene, Book 1—I have been reading mainly books and articles with some relation to nostalgia, broadly...
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    February 08, 2018

    Books in Brief

    The author of this engaging, highly interesting, and extremely well-written book is senior fellow and Hyde Park Resident Historian at the Roosevelt Institute, in addition to holding academic professorships at both Marist and Bard College.
  • Hawks Win
    Column
    February 08, 2018

    Hawks Win

    The Pentagon’s National Defense Strategy, which Defense Secretary James Mattis presented on January 19, envisages aggressive measures to counter Russia and China and instructs the military to refocus on Cold War-style competition with them, away...
  • Special Again
    Column
    February 08, 2018

    Special Again

    The British, like everyone else, enjoy feigning horror at President Donald Trump. Deep down, however, we know we need him, and we like him a lot more than we let on.
  • Welcome Back, Potter
    Column
    February 08, 2018

    Welcome Back, Potter

    Several years ago, aided by the wonders of modern technology and the principle of fair use, a number of people independently produced remixes of It’s a Wonderful Life as a horror movie.
  • Rising to the Occasion
    Column
    February 08, 2018

    Rising to the Occasion

    Toward the end of Darkest Hour, we watch Gary Oldman as Winston Churchill board a train car on the London Underground and begin talking to passengers, all of whom rather wondrously recognize him.
  • Choosing Caliphs
    Polemics & Exchanges
    February 08, 2018

    Choosing Caliphs

    After reading Aaron D. Wolf’s “Prince of Darkness” (Heresies, January) I can see that the author knows very little about Muslims. In every Islamic country, the strong rule.
  • To Serve and Be Served
    Polemics & Exchanges
    February 08, 2018

    To Serve and Be Served

    If you will forgive my dampening of Chilton Williamson’s Schadenfreude slightly (“The Job of Sex,” Editorials, January), I feel a need to note that there were women in the workplace long before the feminist movement insisted on putting them there.
  • Two Friends, Two Americas
    Reviews
    February 08, 2018

    Two Friends, Two Americas

    Gordon Wood, regarded as the foremost historian of the American Revolution, has written a very fine account of the friendship between John Adams and Thomas Jefferson.
  • Not Your Brain
    Reviews
    February 08, 2018

    Not Your Brain

    Let’s give credit where it’s due. Linda Greenhouse, retired Supreme Court correspondent for the New York Times, is a brilliantly qualified journalist: hard-working, creative, dedicated to the needs of her profession as she understands them.
  • The Loss of the Familiar
    In Our Time
    February 08, 2018

    The Loss of the Familiar

    From the late 19th or early 20th century down to the present day, liberalism has been progressively oriented to psychology and therapeutic technique.
  • A Patriotic Tax Plan
    Society & Culture
    January 11, 2018

    A Patriotic Tax Plan

    Aside from its sheer incomprehensibility, the U.S. federal tax code is immoral, by design. Its 75,000 pages exceed its 1917 length 187-fold. Paradoxically, even though the tax code contains more than four million words, the United States...
  • “The World’s Greatest Pianist”
    Column
    January 11, 2018

    “The World’s Greatest Pianist”

    The lives of musicians can be more than a bit repetitive. The same patterns are repeated again and again, as is the case with athletes—with all people who master a particular art or calling.
  • American Artisan
    Society & Culture
    January 11, 2018

    American Artisan

    Whenever Robert Valade embarked on a commissioned piece, or simply took his hammer and chisel to cut an exquisitely fashioned design into a gift for a friend, he first bowed his large head and prayed to God to help him finish the job right.
  • The Klondike Stampede, Part II
    Column
    January 11, 2018

    The Klondike Stampede, Part II

    The 250 Indians who inhabited Dyea on the eve of the gold rush were Chilkats, members of the Tlingit tribe. They were short and stocky, and excellent packers. They commonly carried packs of 100 pounds or more.
  • Campus Utopias
    Column
    January 11, 2018

    Campus Utopias

    As we gathered in the gazebo, sitting on the hard white benches with the paint peeling off in strips, nursing Marlboros—the girls wielding cigarette-holders, like scepters—we decided then and there who and what was the main obstacle to our goal.
  • Big Tech as Big Brother
    Reviews
    January 11, 2018

    Big Tech as Big Brother

    Conservatives more than anyone else view with a gimlet eye the rise of the Internet and the gigantic tech companies that are taking over ever larger parts of our lives.
  • What Mean Ye By These Stones?
    Correspondence
    January 11, 2018

    What Mean Ye By These Stones?

    Pro-slavery or no, a single one of Fitzhugh’s works is easily worth all the publications of a dozen 21st-century mainstream conservatives—neo-or crunchy. Who believes that modern man is so enlightened that he has nothing to learn from Fitzhugh,...
  • Chained Bible
    Correspondence
    January 11, 2018

    Chained Bible

    The Church of England is now a citadel of advanced liberalism. It went over to secularism long ago, and its zealots intensify their hold upon doctrine and practice. The charge sheet includes, but is not confined to, support for the transgender...
  • Freedom From Monopolies
    Society & Culture
    January 11, 2018

    Freedom From Monopolies

    In June 2017, the European Union fined Google a record-breaking €2.42 billion for abusing the dominance of its popular search engine while building its online shopping service.
  • Shepherd in a Strange Land
    Reviews
    January 11, 2018

    Shepherd in a Strange Land

    “I’m a pastor, not a scholar,” Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, head of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia since 2011, said when I interviewed him earlier last year for Catholic World Report about his new book. “A bishop’s job is helping people get to...
  • Signs and Revelations
    Column
    January 11, 2018

    Signs and Revelations

    Three Billboards is hilarious; yet it could hardly be sadder. How can it be both at once? That’s director Martin McDonagh’s signature move. He’s a practitioner of a Swiftian satire that’s blacker than pitch and thus guaranteed to delight some...
  • Beyond Imagination: Uranium One
    Views
    January 11, 2018

    Beyond Imagination: Uranium One

    The multilayered story surrounding Uranium One—the former South African, then Canadian, and now Russian company, of which both Bill and Hillary Clinton and their family foundation are the enriched beneficiaries—has all the usual elements of a...
  • The Long Retreat Through the Institutions
    In Our Time
    January 11, 2018

    The Long Retreat Through the Institutions

    Twenty-sixteen was the year when American liberals confidently expected to consolidate the quiet political and cultural revolution they had been conducting for decades in the coming national elections.
  • Return of the Kings
    Editorials
    January 11, 2018

    Return of the Kings

    In a television appearance on January 7, President Emmanuel Macron of France, rather than addressing his compatriots exclusively, directed his remarks to his “fellow citizens of the E.U.,” saying, “2018 is a very special year, and I will need you...
  • Shoes to Fill
    Editorials
    January 11, 2018

    Shoes to Fill

    America is a nation of normal people who find themselves thrust into increasingly abnormal situations. Left-wing ideologues want to take a country of families, churches, and businesses and turn it into a playpen of radical identities.
  • Trump, Beating the Odds
    Editorials
    January 11, 2018

    Trump, Beating the Odds

    U.S. employment increased over President Trump’s first year in office, expanding from 145,541,000 in January to 147,380,000 in December, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Thus, amid the sound and fury of #NeverTrump media coverage,...
  • Feds: Stop “Helping”
    Editorials
    January 11, 2018

    Feds: Stop “Helping”

    Student-loan debt in the United States is now $1.48 trillion. That incredible sum is a heavy drag on the economy and a burden on young people. And federal intervention in education is the cause.
  • Cult of America, Part I
    Column
    January 11, 2018

    Cult of America, Part I

    Whether or not America is or ever was a Christian nation is hotly debated. It is fashionable today on the left to ascribe whatever currently is deemed by it to be unacceptable to the legacy of privileged patriarchal white men whose Christianity...
  • Drain the Racket
    Reviews
    January 11, 2018

    Drain the Racket

    When Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was first passed, “help wanted: men” and “help wanted: women” ads were common in newspapers. Private employers could hire and fire for discriminatory reasons.
  • Time’s Terpsichorean
    Reviews
    January 11, 2018

    Time’s Terpsichorean

    Anthony Powell’s million-word, 12-volume novel sequence, A Dance to the Music of Time, is one of the great achievements of postwar English literature, attracting near-universal praise for its subtle and textured evocation of England between World...
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    January 11, 2018

    Books in Brief

    This is an excellent account—part social, part military, and part political—of the Mexican-American War, fought between 1846 and 1848 and concluded by the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo in 1849 that ceded, essentially, the northern half of Mexico to...
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    January 11, 2018

    What the Editors Are Reading

    Anthony Powell’s 12-volume Dance to the Music of Time is a work I’ve had in mind to look into for decades without ever having done so, until the publication last year of Hilary Spurling’s biography of the late English novelist.
  • Neocon Security Strategy
    Column
    January 11, 2018

    Neocon Security Strategy

    Devising a great power’s national-security strategy is serious business. When external challenges are properly evaluated, tasks prioritized, and resources allocated, the results can be impressive.
  • Freedom From Obligation
    Column
    January 11, 2018

    Freedom From Obligation

    For many Americans at or near the mid-century mark of their lives, Frank Capra has shaped their understanding of the meaning of Christmas in a way that only Charles Dickens could possibly rival.
  • The New Deplorables
    Column
    January 11, 2018

    The New Deplorables

    After Roy Moore secured the Republican nomination to fill Jeff Sessions’ seat in the U.S. Senate, the Washington Post ran an article claiming that, roughly four decades ago, Moore had dated two teenage girls and asked out a third in front of her...
  • Never Be Royals
    Column
    January 11, 2018

    Never Be Royals

    Had she claimed to be 100-percent African-American, or to be a lesbian, transgender, or simply bisexual, the adoration would have been even more pronounced. If she had a criminal record, the perverse New York Times would have gone bananas,...
  • Afghanistan’s Depraved Opportunism
    Society & Culture
    December 08, 2017

    Afghanistan’s Depraved Opportunism

    In “Staying the Course in Afghanistan: How to Fight the Longest War,” published in the November/December 2017 Foreign Affairs, retired Army Gen. Stanley McChrystal and one Kosh Sadat, both employed by the eponymous McChrystal Group, argue for the...
  • Get Big or Get Out
    Column
    December 08, 2017

    Get Big or Get Out

    Most people think of E.F. Schumacher today (to the extent that they think of him at all) as some sort of vaguely leftist harbinger of the environmentalist movement.
  • John di Martino
    Correspondence
    December 08, 2017

    John di Martino

    In the early days of his career in 1982, jazz pianist John di Martino was a member of the house trio accompanying such internationally famous vocalists as Billy Daniels and Keely Smith at Steve’s Lounge and Elaine’s Lounge, two of the show rooms...
  • Orbán: Building the Wall
    Correspondence
    December 08, 2017

    Orbán: Building the Wall

    Situated between Austria and Rumania, Hungary has a rich history worthy of many books. And though this country of less than ten million people is the size of the state of Maine, her role on the world stage is only increasing.
  • Fire in the Minds of Men
    Reviews
    December 08, 2017

    Fire in the Minds of Men

    Recently, we marked the 100th anniversary of the 1917 Russian Revolution, an event sparked by the revolutionary fire in the minds of men that has burned for as long as there have been men on the earth.
  • What’s Sweet and Proper
    Reviews
    December 08, 2017

    What’s Sweet and Proper

    Joseph Pearce has created what he calls a “verse tapestry,” a weaving together of the poetry of Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen, two English poets whose experiences in World War I brought them to profound anger and despondency, each of them...
  • Mission Accomplished
    Reviews
    December 08, 2017

    Mission Accomplished

    Gary Sheffield is an old hand at writing the history of World War I. In addition to being a professor of war studies at the University of Wolverhampton, he was co-editor of Douglas Haig: War Diaries and Letters, 1914-18.
  • An Age of Indoor Cats
    Society & Culture
    December 08, 2017

    An Age of Indoor Cats

    Cats, I’ve sometimes been told, make better pets than dogs, because cats are more independent, which is just another way of saying that dogs have been domesticated for so many thousands of years, they are genetically the kinds of creatures that...
  • Blame Us!
    Column
    December 08, 2017

    Blame Us!

    Only the most delusional limey would deny that, when it comes to popular culture, Britain is downstream from America. In politics, too, we follow your lead. Tony Blair pursued Bill Clinton’s middle way; David Cameron adopted George W. Bush’s...
  • Throw in the Towel
    Column
    December 08, 2017

    Throw in the Towel

    If you thought comedy was dead, take a look at the newest Napoleon on the block, the one wearing sandals on his feet and a tablecloth on his head, and striking an heroic pose with his hairy legs wrapped around a camel’s hump.
  • Cultural Notes, in Two Keys
    In Our Time
    December 08, 2017

    Cultural Notes, in Two Keys

    The liberal print media, like all things liberal, are never more themselves than when searching out, discovering, and deploring violence in America while remaining blissfully unaware of the verbal violence they commit every minute of the day in...
  • Prince of Darkness
    Column
    December 08, 2017

    Prince of Darkness

    As the calendar rolls over to 2018, we need to take stock of where we are as Americans, noting the dangers that lie ahead. Those dangers involve politics, culture, economics, foreign policy, and religion, as well as our capacity as postmodern...
  • Trump’s First Year
    Column
    December 08, 2017

    Trump’s First Year

    A key source of volatility in today’s international system is the propensity of the U.S. government to reject any conventionally ordered hierarchy of American global interests. Washington’s deterritorialized policy of full-spectrum dominance is...
  • How to Live
    Reviews
    December 08, 2017

    How to Live

    In her Preface to this collection, Catharine Savage Brosman tells the reader that these essays are of three kinds: recollections of her own life and family, commentaries on literature, and examinations of the current state of American culture.
  • <em>Book in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    December 08, 2017

    Book in Brief

    At the center of the controversy were Burr himself, Jefferson, and James Wilkinson, then ranking general in the U.S. Army and governor of the Louisiana Territory.
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    December 08, 2017

    What the Editors Are Reading

    Alexandre Dumas, born the grandson of a French nobleman and an African slave in Saint-Domingue (today Haiti) in 1802 and son of one of Napoleon’s officers in Italy and Egypt, accomplished a prodigious amount of work in his 68 years.
  • Cold War Comfort
    Column
    December 08, 2017

    Cold War Comfort

    To say I was a difficult child is something of an understatement: I was a wild child. In retrospect, I can only feel sorry for my poor parents, who had no idea what to do with me. I was simply unmanageable.
  • My Old Kentucky Home, Good Night!
    Column
    December 08, 2017

    My Old Kentucky Home, Good Night!

    History is rewritten, memory is transformed, recognition is withdrawn, and the cultural context is recast. The recent toppling of historical statues has proceeded so effectively that we can hardly remember a previous period of statue erection or...
  • The Weight of the Past
    Column
    December 08, 2017

    The Weight of the Past

    Two years ago, I swore off Marvel films. With the exception of Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man (2002), there’s not a one of the 50 or so other superhero productions that exhibits a scrap of genuine wit, despite the actors cocking their eyebrows to say...
  • Obama’s Manufacturing Bust
    Editorials
    December 08, 2017

    Obama’s Manufacturing Bust

    Barack H. Obama left office as the first Democratic president to preside over a net loss of domestic manufacturing jobs since the U.S. government started compiling records in the late 1930’s.
  • Politicians #NeverLearn
    Editorials
    December 08, 2017

    Politicians #NeverLearn

    Donald Trump’s first year as President is drawing to a close, and it’s been rough. The Republican Congress proved unequal to the task of repealing Obama Care. The border wall hasn’t been built.
  • The Job of Sex
    Editorials
    December 08, 2017

    The Job of Sex

    The lares and penates of post-Christian (actually postpagan) America are Money, Sex, and Power, not necessarily in that order but rather according to individual taste and proclivity.
  • We Will Fight Like Lions
    Polemics & Exchanges
    December 08, 2017

    We Will Fight Like Lions

    A few years ago, a respected Chronicles editor disagreed with my judgment on the behavior of a deceased Trappist abbot who had repeatedly bowed down in a mosque to the god of the unhappy Saracens in order to chum it up with his Mohammedan neighbors.
  • Trump, NAFTA, and America First
    Views
    December 08, 2017

    Trump, NAFTA, and America First

    President Donald Trump has made the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) a cornerstone of his economic policy. Signed into law by Democrat Bill Clinton in 1993 with Republican support, NAFTA created a managed trade...
  • Weinstein: Who Cares—and Why
    Society & Culture
    November 02, 2017

    Weinstein: Who Cares—and Why

    The public support of Weinstein, along with the deafening silence and lack of pity for his forsaken wife and young children, stand as testament to a sick subculture where families, and family, have never jibed with Hollywood’s libertine agenda.
  • Surrounded by Books
    Society & Culture
    November 02, 2017

    Surrounded by Books

    Surrounded by books has been a main circumstance of my long life. So it is now, near the end of my 94th year, when I am in my large library of perhaps 18,000 books in the western wing of my house in Chester County, Pennsylvania.
  • Hollywood and Bethlehem
    Column
    November 02, 2017

    Hollywood and Bethlehem

    Hollywood loves Christmas, or Winterfest, or whatever they’re calling it these days. This is because many Americans make it the most wonderful time of the year for the studios, offering them gifts of gold.
  • Regional Anthem
    Reviews
    November 02, 2017

    Regional Anthem

    A century ago, the American Midwest was in the ascendant, widely acknowledged as the nation’s vital Heartland, a place characterized by a morally strong and independent populace, a relatively egalitarian distribution of wealth in land (the...
  • Why Are We Here?
    Reviews
    November 02, 2017

    Why Are We Here?

    Where does life come from, and why is it what it is? These are great mysteries. Even so, Darwinian theorists tell us it is nothing but a mechanical process that in principle is entirely explicable by reference to biochemistry, and thus to...
  • Stupid Is Not Enough
    Reviews
    November 02, 2017

    Stupid Is Not Enough

    Annals of the Stupid Party is more than a blistering critique of Republican ineptitude. Wilson is delivering one last two-by-four to the elephant: Donald Trump has taught you how to win again, by confronting such crucial issues as trade and...
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    November 02, 2017

    Books in Brief

    Professor Lilla’s book, which appeared originally as an essay in the New York Review of Books, has received much attention (almost all of it bad) from liberals angered by its thesis that identity politics as it has developed over the past couple...
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    November 02, 2017

    What the Editors Are Reading

    When I was in my teens I read a good deal in the realist school of American fiction: Theodore Dreiser, Upton Sinclair, Frank Norris, and so on. As a more mature reader, I found their work hopelessly dreary, dull, and dead.
  • Transgender: At Odds With Reality
    Society & Culture
    November 02, 2017

    Transgender: At Odds With Reality

    In his infamous work The Myth of Mental Illness, the late Dr. Thomas Szasz argued that psychiatry was not a branch of medicine concerned with treating real illness, but rather an institution of social control.
  • Chronicles of Culture
    Column
    November 02, 2017

    Chronicles of Culture

    For there to be a “context of social relationships,” there must be at least two people. And those people must be part of a society, because that is what social, as an adjective, not only implies but demands, the fantasy worlds constructed by...
  • Operation Cotton Mather
    Column
    November 02, 2017

    Operation Cotton Mather

    The country is currently suffering through a series of moral panics—or, more precisely, the coastal elites are, while the rest of us go about the business of ordinary living.
  • Race, Genocide, and Memory
    Column
    November 02, 2017

    Race, Genocide, and Memory

    In 2012, U.S. historian William H. Frederick sparked a fierce controversy about a horrible if largely forgotten episode in Asian history, the so-called Bersiap movement of the 1940’s.
  • Whither Europe?
    Column
    November 02, 2017

    Whither Europe?

    That Europe is in mortal danger from the ongoing, overwhelmingly Muslim immigrant deluge and from its ruling elites’ spiritual degeneracy is beyond dispute.
  • Of Death and Birth
    Column
    November 02, 2017

    Of Death and Birth

    Watching director Angela Robinson’s Professor Marston and the Wonder Women, I was reminded of Oscar Wilde’s comment concerning sexual tact. “I have no objection to anyone’s sex life,” he once revealed, “as long as they don’t practice it in the...
  • The Politics of Peace
    Editorials
    November 02, 2017

    The Politics of Peace

    Step by step America is being primed for war with Iran. President Trump has not actually torn up the “Iran deal,” but he “decertified” it in October, and his administration is under constant pressure from the war lobby.
  • On the Altar of Empire
    Editorials
    November 02, 2017

    On the Altar of Empire

    The GOP-controlled Congress has received a report from the Pentagon advocating the conscription of women—the daughters, young wives, and young mothers of America, ages 18 to 25—according to the Washington Times.
  • Is Europe Burning?
    Editorials
    November 02, 2017

    Is Europe Burning?

    In 1966 a film called Is Paris Burning?, based on a novel of the same name, was a cinematic sensation. Its subject was the liberation of Paris by the French Free Forces and the French Resistance in 1944.
  • Camps & Nature Abhors
    Polemics & Exchanges
    November 02, 2017

    Camps & Nature Abhors

    Let me begin by thanking Chilton Williamson, Jr., for the many enjoyable hours spent reading his columns, which are always one of the highlights of Chronicles. His recent article “The Anti-Prometheans” (In Our Time, October) similarly has much...
  • Maria Callas, Four Decades On
    Column
    November 02, 2017

    Maria Callas, Four Decades On

    Many’s the person who can tell you what he was doing on November 22, 1963, when he heard the news. Many more can tell you what they were doing on the morning of September 11, 2001. And there are also quite a few who remember September 16, 1977,...
  • Fact-Free: Where No Center Holds
    Views
    November 02, 2017

    Fact-Free: Where No Center Holds

    Facts were fuzzy in the ancient world. From Homer to Herodotus, . . . myth, science, and history met and mingled, merging into amalgams that were almost invariably greater than the sum of their parts and yet less than what might pass our...
  • Twin Threats to the Land of Fire
    Correspondence
    November 02, 2017

    Twin Threats to the Land of Fire

    My first stroll through Fountain Square in the walking district of Baku, Azerbaijan, revealed the warp and woof of the city. If I didn’t know otherwise, had someone told me that I was on the Zeil promenade in Frankfurt, Germany, rather than in a...
  • The Pronouns of Bedlam
    Society & Culture
    November 02, 2017

    The Pronouns of Bedlam

    Jordan Peterson and others like him understand in their bones one great truth: Language matters. The names by which we call people, places, and things are vital both to our perceptions of reality and to reality itself.
  • The Klondike Stampede, Part I
    Column
    November 02, 2017

    The Klondike Stampede, Part I

    It has always surprised me that the last great gold rush in North America is mostly absent from American history textbooks, especially those of more recent vintage. It’s as if the stampede to the Klondike never happened.
  • Harvey and Teddy
    Column
    November 02, 2017

    Harvey and Teddy

    I was walking up Madison Avenue when I spotted two comely young women having tea at a sidewalk café. It was a couple of days after the scandal, so I stopped and introduced myself as Harvey Weinstein and asked them if they wanted a drink back at...
  • The Engineered Empathy Gene
    In Our Time
    November 02, 2017

    The Engineered Empathy Gene

    The “death of God” thesis encourages people to consider what we owe to other people in a world in which only human beings can help themselves, and others. In a God-forsaken universe, sharing others’ sufferings (though much less their joys)...
  • America Mispriced
    Society & Culture
    October 05, 2017

    America Mispriced

    Warren Buffett once joked that only when the tide goes out do we realize who’s been swimming naked. Hurricane Harvey’s gale force winds and 50-plus inches of rain will give Houstonians a similarly embarrassing realization.
  • Recessional
    Correspondence
    October 05, 2017

    Recessional

    P.G. Wodehouse reached for Keats to describe his emotions when he read the first of George MacDonald Fraser’s Flashman saga. Fraser had already joined the glorious company of famously successful authors who were turned away from the doors of...
  • Worse at What It Is
    Correspondence
    October 05, 2017

    Worse at What It Is

    New York is always changing: It’s the city that never sleeps. When local writer Kay Hymowitz wrote a book about Brooklyn recently she talked about “creative destruction” on almost every other page. She had a point, and the city has seen both...
  • An Uncertain Trump
    Column
    October 05, 2017

    An Uncertain Trump

    During the seemingly endless presidential campaign, Donald Trump was often both courageous and decisive, repeatedly refusing to back down from “gaffes” that were unpopular with the media because they were actually expressions of the populist...
  • No Time for Indulgences
    Column
    October 05, 2017

    No Time for Indulgences

    [W]e cannot afford to set aside our differences: We need to rediscover them, defend them vigorously and magnanimously, teach them to our children, celebrate them in worship and festival, and nail them to the church door when necessary.
  • Bleached Chicken, Brexit, and Trump
    Column
    October 05, 2017

    Bleached Chicken, Brexit, and Trump

    Will he? Won’t he? Ever since Donald Trump emerged as a serious presidential contender last year, the British have been excited at the thought of his arrival in the motherland.
  • Checkmating Middle America
    Column
    October 05, 2017

    Checkmating Middle America

    America’s descent into banana republicanism continues apace, and on two fronts. To begin with, we learn that President Trump’s much-disdained assertion that Trump Tower was being wiretapped during the election campaign turns out to be absolutely...
  • Breeding Mosquitos
    Column
    October 05, 2017

    Breeding Mosquitos

    “Where there’s no solution,” James Burnham used to remark, “there’s no problem.” That’s easy for him to say, the modern populist conservative replies. Burnham died while Reagan was still in office! What did he know about problems?
  • Stepping Ashore
    Reviews
    October 05, 2017

    Stepping Ashore

    The best poetry—great poetry—happens when sound, rhythm, and image bring about a mysterious feeling of wholeness that somehow draws mind, body, and spirit together in what both Yeats and Eliot envisioned as a unified dance.
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    October 05, 2017

    Books in Brief

    As readers and critics had learned everything that is important to know about Hemingway and his work decades ago, subsequent books about the novelist have concentrated on viewing and re-viewing him from various angles.
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    October 05, 2017

    What the Editors Are Reading

    When I was growing up in Manhattan the generational text for the generation immediately before mine was The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger. My tastes in high school ran to Thomas Wolfe (of course), Sherwood Anderson, Sinclair Lewis, Ernest...
  • The Birth of National-Globalism
    Column
    October 05, 2017

    The Birth of National-Globalism

    Following President Trump’s maiden speech to the U.N. General Assembly on September 19, ideologically incompatible analysts have found similar reasons to cheer or condemn the 40-minute oration.
  • Mad Bombers of the Amazon
    Column
    October 05, 2017

    Mad Bombers of the Amazon

    Instead of getting life without parole in one of those white isolation cells in the toughest of jails for aiding and abetting terrorism, he is fêted the world over and is among America’s wealthiest men, after Bill Gates and Warren Buffett.
  • The Trumping of the GOP
    Editorials
    October 05, 2017

    The Trumping of the GOP

    There were two reasons to support Donald J. Trump in the presidential campaign last year. The first was the man himself, whom one could trust to deliver a much needed shock to the utterly narcissistic, self-involved American political system...
  • The Terminal Playboy
    Editorials
    October 05, 2017

    The Terminal Playboy

    When he died on September 27 at the age of 91, Hugh Hefner was no playboy. He was an old man trapped in what amounted to a factory, surrounded by silicone, plastic, and hydrogen compounds.
  • German Shock
    Editorials
    October 05, 2017

    German Shock

    The liberal faith in the power of incantation is but one of many ways in which liberalism reveals its essentially religious nature.
  • Not for Hunting
    Editorials
    October 05, 2017

    Not for Hunting

    The Las Vegas shooter who murdered some five-dozen country-music fans and injured over 500 more had barely cashed in his chips when Democrats, celebrities, and the punditocracy began calling for their favorite gun-control measures and blaming the...
  • Of Places and Ideas
    Polemics & Exchanges
    October 05, 2017

    Of Places and Ideas

    Bravo to Jason Michael Morgan for his essay “The Pernicious Myth of Two Americas” (View, October). I am one of those people who live in America, the place, not America, the idea. Specifically, Middle America—the Heartland, some would say.
  • Unlovable Losers: The Left in Perspective
    Society & Culture
    October 05, 2017

    Unlovable Losers: The Left in Perspective

    Americans are smarter, more intuitive, than many conservatives may think. As time goes by, polls show that they have little tolerance, let alone enthusiasm, for the concepts of “microaggressions” or “safe spaces” or harebrained initiatives to...
  • Too Steep a Price: Why the Liberal Family Died
    Society & Culture
    October 05, 2017

    Too Steep a Price: Why the Liberal Family Died

    Over half a century ago, the family system advocated by John Locke and modeled on Lockean liberalism seemed to have triumphed completely in the United States, in Western Europe, and globally.
  • Rediscovering the Paterfamilias
    Society & Culture
    October 05, 2017

    Rediscovering the Paterfamilias

    Cicero wrote De Officiis to his son, Marcus, a student of philosophy who had just finished his first year in Athens. Though Cicero does not state it directly, the work is meant to supplement what, to his mind, Greek philosophy lacked most: good...
  • The Vocal Scene
    Column
    October 05, 2017

    The Vocal Scene

    Of course my account of “the vocal scene” is not by the late George Jellinek—that cultured gentleman of Hungarian background. He had an extensive, even encyclopedic knowledge of the history of singing.
  • Allegorically Yours
    Column
    October 05, 2017

    Allegorically Yours

    I am about to discuss a truly wretched film: mother!, written and directed by Darren Aronofsky. Before I do I must warn you that I’ll be violating the reviewer’s rule against revealing a film’s central conceit and its ending.
  • Love Thyself: The West’s Fatal Flaw
    Views
    October 05, 2017

    Love Thyself: The West’s Fatal Flaw

    What used to be Western civilization is indeed threatened today with progressive extinction at the hands of Muslim immigration, which considers the West as a worthless relic of a useless past, at best, or, in the minds of Islam’s more or less...
  • The Convenient Religion
    In Our Time
    October 05, 2017

    The Convenient Religion

    Everyone in America today—right, left, or middle, if there still is one—can agree that the explosive political response to Donald Trump’s presidency is unprecedented in American political history.
  • A Great Perhaps
    Reviews
    October 05, 2017

    A Great Perhaps

    Sale’s theme is the restoration of “human scale” in all our works: architectural, political, economic, educational, and technological. His thesis is that only radical decentralization can achieve this aim.
  • The Camelot-Chequers Axis
    Reviews
    October 05, 2017

    The Camelot-Chequers Axis

    At the kernel of this story is the at times ambivalent relationship between JFK and his bluntly outspoken father, whose appointment in 1938 as ambassador to the Court of St. James seemed inexplicable even at the time.
  • Core Values and the Kingdom
    Society & Culture
    September 07, 2017

    Core Values and the Kingdom

    Saudi Arabia’s national oil and natural-gas company, Saudi Aramco, recently announced plans to go public in 2018. Dating back to the fuel shortages of World War I, Saudi Aramco came into existence largely as a result of Standard Oil’s...
  • Very Bad on Both Sides
    Column
    September 07, 2017

    Very Bad on Both Sides

    Charlottesville was a shameful disaster, and the responses from America’s elites were far from encouraging. Most of them amounted to “Who started it?” That is the response of a child.
  • The E.U.’s Soft Underbelly
    Reviews
    September 07, 2017

    The E.U.’s Soft Underbelly

    The key wormhole in the central planners’ tottering but still grand scheme is the troubled euro, which is the handiwork of politicians, bureaucrats, and court economists whose vision proved to be more political than economic.
  • Realism of the Real
    Reviews
    September 07, 2017

    Realism of the Real

    In calendar terms, the novel is set in the early 1990’s, a time that is further away from us than we care to realize. Although many of us remember the early 90’s, we forget how long ago it was, not in terms of years, a quarter of a century being...
  • Making It Close
    Reviews
    September 07, 2017

    Making It Close

    Bearings and Distances is a considerable achievement in construction, technique, narration, drama, characterization, human insight, and most other things I can think of that go to make a novel a fine novel.
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    September 07, 2017

    Books in Brief

    Beethoven wrote his nine symphonies between 1800 and 1824 at the height of the Romantic movement that overlapped the end of the Enlightenment.
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    September 07, 2017

    What the Editors Are Reading

    I’ve at times found the great English writer and apologist G.K. Chesterton wearisome for his seemingly unending parade of paradoxes, some of which strike me as the discovery of paradoxes for paradox’s sake.
  • Zeus Reigns
    Correspondence
    September 07, 2017

    Zeus Reigns

    We don’t need to be convinced of the European Union’s bureaucratic overreach. Its administrative and regulatory impulses, particularly in its largest and wealthiest member states, have long been a problem.
  • The Indians Who Never Were
    Column
    September 07, 2017

    The Indians Who Never Were

    Portland and Seattle have developed sizeable communities of disaffected leftists who are antagonistic toward everything that is traditional America. Hundreds of young folks are ready at a moment’s notice to flood into the streets to protest the...
  • No Good Deed . . .
    Column
    September 07, 2017

    No Good Deed . . .

    Sheriff Joe Arpaio, hated by the open-borders crowd but loved by those who want to uphold America’s immigration laws, has always been surrounded by controversies—they whirl around him like dust storms in the Arizona desert.
  • East of Eden
    Column
    September 07, 2017

    East of Eden

    Russell Kirk frequently warned those who read his essays and books and attended his lectures not to let the perfect be the enemy of the good. Even at the most mundane level of everyday life, the Sage of Mecosta offered good advice.
  • A Tale of Two Revolutions
    Column
    September 07, 2017

    A Tale of Two Revolutions

    A hundred years ago, in the early hours of November 7, 1917, the Bolsheviks grabbed power in Petrograd. Within weeks they took advantage of Russia’s collapsing political and social structure to impose control over the country’s heartland.
  • The Little People
    Column
    September 07, 2017

    The Little People

    You wouldn’t think a director who’s made three extravagantly fanciful Batman movies would be interested in turning his hand to a realistic rendering of a true episode from World War II, but this is what Christopher Nolan has done with his film...
  • You May Say You’re a Dreamer
    Editorials
    September 07, 2017

    You May Say You’re a Dreamer

    The unconstitutional Obama executive order known as DACA was rescinded by the Trump DOJ on September 5. Even as the courageous and unassuming A.G. Jeff Sessions made the announcement, thousands of tweets painted him as a hood-donning...
  • Needed: Hands and Nerves
    Editorials
    September 07, 2017

    Needed: Hands and Nerves

    Decades before Donald Trump vanquished Hillary Clinton, Pat Buchanan heralded the themes that would put Trump in the White House. Yet despite all that lead time, Trump’s victory was still in one sense premature.
  • Trump and the GOP
    Polemics & Exchanges
    September 07, 2017

    Trump and the GOP

    My thanks to Chilton Williamson, Jr., for his excellent article “The Meaning of Donald Trump,” in which he clearly outlines the successes of the candidate and now President in terms of his “demystification and desacralization of the tenets of...
  • The Pernicious Myth of “Two Americas”
    Views
    September 07, 2017

    The Pernicious Myth of “Two Americas”

    Liberalism is not some alternative to family, place, patriotism, and religion: It is a stain on them. Out, damned spot. This land is my land. Not yours.
  • The Anti-Prometheans
    In Our Time
    September 07, 2017

    The Anti-Prometheans

    Barack Obama’s words “We are the ones we’ve been waiting for” have come to stand as the motto of his presidency. (Their author was actually the black Caribbean bisexual poetess June Jordan.)
  • Khrushchev and Me
    Society & Culture
    September 07, 2017

    Khrushchev and Me

    Around 50 years ago Basil D’Oliveira, a South African-born, olive-skinned professional cricketer who emigrated to England and qualified to play for his adopted home’s national team, was as controversial a sportsman in his way as Muhammad Ali, or...
  • The Brave Professor
    Correspondence
    September 07, 2017

    The Brave Professor

    At the University of Toronto, one man has shown us just how uphill the climb is against political correctness, and what sort of reaction we may expect if we fight it. He may also have shown us how to win.
  • Leftists, Creationists, and Useful Idiots
    Correspondence
    September 07, 2017

    Leftists, Creationists, and Useful Idiots

    Not everyone here in the Bluegrass State was delighted by the 2007 opening of the Creation Museum in Boone County. “There’s been such a push in recent years to improve science education,” a representative of the Kentucky Paleontology Society...
  • Choose Your Side
    Reviews
    September 07, 2017

    Choose Your Side

    The first thought that occurred to me upon receiving a review copy of David Garrow’s hefty biography of our former president was, besides its weight (four pounds), how the jacket photograph perfectly expresses what is revealed in 1,084 pages of...
  • Diana
    Society & Culture
    September 07, 2017

    Diana

    “Great is Diana of the Ephesians!” cried the craftsmen of Ephesus. They had heard of the threat to their occupation posed by Paul (Acts 19: 24-29), who was violently against the making of images.
  • The Romantic Revival
    Column
    September 07, 2017

    The Romantic Revival

    The first thing to say about the Romantic Revival is that the phrase itself is a bit ambiguous, though I haven’t meant to be misleading. Romanticism originally had an aspect of revival of the medieval, as in the Gothic revival and the revival of...
  • Who Went Nazi?
    Column
    September 07, 2017

    Who Went Nazi?

    When the Germans smuggled arguably the world’s most evil man into Russia 100 years ago, they did not imagine the harm they were springing on the human race. Once Lenin had prevailed, he decided to forge a new consciousness, a New Man, as the...
  • Who’s the Most Hateful of Them All?
    Editorials
    September 07, 2017

    Who’s the Most Hateful of Them All?

    No studies indicate, let alone demonstrate, that a significant percentage of ordinary white people “hate” black people, or black white, or indeed that an appreciable number belonging to any race in America today “hates” members of any other race.
  • Outdated
    Society & Culture
    August 03, 2017

    Outdated

    Albert and David Maysles’s classic documentary Grey Gardens provided a disturbing snapshot of 1970’s American upper-class life, replete with mentally ill dowagers, feral cats, and a crumbling estate.
  • Taking a Stand in Warsaw
    Column
    August 03, 2017

    Taking a Stand in Warsaw

    With a monument to the 1944 Warsaw Uprising as his backdrop, President Trump delivered a forceful speech on the eve of the G20 Summit, sounding themes that would not be welcome by most other leaders of the world’s most economically powerful...
  • Remembering the Old Russia
    Column
    August 03, 2017

    Remembering the Old Russia

    This Fall marks the centennial of the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution. Although few commentators today are likely to glorify that event or its aftermath, most will assume that the revolution was a regrettable necessity, which swept away a repressive...
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    August 03, 2017

    Books in Brief

    This is an interesting and well-executed account of the compositional, publishing, critical, and popular history of Victor Hugo’s famous novel that may—or may not—be “the novel of the century.”
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    August 03, 2017

    What the Editors Are Reading

    As the author of a travel book as well as many novels, I’ve often suspected that writing a superior work in the first category is a greater challenge than writing one in the second.
  • A Conservative Tax Code
    Society & Culture
    August 03, 2017

    A Conservative Tax Code

    Few American objects attract more scorn than the federal Internal Revenue Code. When initially drafted in 1914, it contained 11,400 words, about the length of a long magazine article.
  • Rumors of War
    Column
    August 03, 2017

    Rumors of War

    By the seventh month of Donald Trump’s presidency a surreal quality to U.S. foreign policy decision-making had become evident. It is at odds with both the theoretical model and historical practice.
  • Unflinching Women
    Column
    August 03, 2017

    Unflinching Women

    You wouldn’t think the life of a poet would make a good film, but Terence Davies’ account of Emily Dickinson’s passage through our world is not only a good film, but one of considerable artistic achievement.
  • Parties and Strange Bedfellows
    Column
    August 03, 2017

    Parties and Strange Bedfellows

    London summer parties are a dime a dozen. The moment the weather turns hot, Englishmen cast aside their brollies and head for a garden party. This year was no different.
  • A Small Victory for Europe
    Editorials
    August 03, 2017

    A Small Victory for Europe

    As the new French President, Emmanuel Macron seems determined to hitch opposites together, combine like with dislike, compatibles with incompatibles, and otherwise fudge his policies as he did during the electoral campaign.
  • Nothing in the Middle
    Editorials
    August 03, 2017

    Nothing in the Middle

    Have you noticed? Newspapers and television channels across the land have discovered a new kind of human-interest story: the business-owning, family-man illegal immigrant who gets deported after living in this country for decades as a productive...
  • The Abnormal Nation
    Editorials
    August 03, 2017

    The Abnormal Nation

    Since the reunification of East and West Germany in 1990, Germans have debated the question of whether their country can ever be a “normal” one again.
  • Still Printing the Legend
    Polemics & Exchanges
    August 03, 2017

    Still Printing the Legend

    I have to admit, I began reading Roger D. McGrath's article “The Real McCoy,” (Sins of Omission, August) about Tim McCoy with the suspicion that he was just pulling my leg, but was drawn in enough to read it to the end.
  • The Future of Politics
    In Our Time
    August 03, 2017

    The Future of Politics

    It is a healthy and encouraging sign when politicians don’t know where they’re going because they have no idea what’s coming next, which pretty much describes the state of politics in the West today.
  • Get Out
    Column
    August 03, 2017

    Get Out

    No matter what follows in Afghanistan after America’s departure, it is immoral to gamble with the lives of our troops for one more minute to provide for the common defense of the Pashtuns.
  • The Tragedy of Richard Nixon
    Reviews
    August 03, 2017

    The Tragedy of Richard Nixon

    Pat Buchanan’s new biography of Richard Nixon’s presidency is the first volume anyone looking at that tumultuous time should turn to. Having served as Nixon’s researcher and speechwriter starting in 1966, Buchanan, not yet 30, followed the...
  • A Terrible Twilight
    Reviews
    August 03, 2017

    A Terrible Twilight

    Douglas Murray makes a ferociously well-argued case that Europe is now engaged on a parallel course: “Europe is committing suicide. Or at least its leaders have decided to commit suicide.
  • Still Unexplained
    Reviews
    August 03, 2017

    Still Unexplained

    Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), dean of St. Patrick’s Church of Ireland cathedral in Dublin, was a most remarkable man.
  • Opposite Directions
    Column
    August 03, 2017

    Opposite Directions

    History not only repeats itself but inverts itself. When these things happen simultaneously, the result is precisely what is happening today, as conservatives return to their “isolationist” roots and progressives return to their warmongering ways.
  • <em>Eine Kleiber Ist Genug—Nicht</em>
    Column
    August 03, 2017

    Eine Kleiber Ist Genug—Nicht

    When Carlos Kleiber died in 2004, the world didn’t find it out until he had been gone for six days. The elusive maestro/uncanny conductor had escaped the exploitative notice of the press for one last time.
  • The Poison and the Antidote
    Views
    August 03, 2017

    The Poison and the Antidote

    No historian worth his honoraria ascribes major social change to a single factor. That is ideology, not history. Nonetheless, an ideology has been and remains a large cause of America’s cultural and moral decline over the past half century.
  • The Meaning of Macron—and the “Right” in the West
    Correspondence
    August 03, 2017

    The Meaning of Macron—and the “Right” in the West

    “He is on the right.” “That party represents the right.” These are standard expressions that are familiar today in the West, including France. But as usual, few understand or even care about the precise meaning of the word.
  • What I Saw (and Prayed) in New Orleans
    Correspondence
    August 03, 2017

    What I Saw (and Prayed) in New Orleans

    At Mayor Landrieu's behest and with the nod of the city council, four commemorative monuments, each over 100 years old, were removed by masked men. Three of their targets were world-class sculptures.
  • Gloriously Complicated
    Column
    August 03, 2017

    Gloriously Complicated

    On June 8, British democracy did everything it wasn’t supposed to do. Having called a snap general election, Prime Minister Theresa May was expected to sweep everything before her. She did not.
  • Make Yourself at Home
    Column
    August 03, 2017

    Make Yourself at Home

    “Unless you were born here, you will never really be at home in this city.” Amy and I heard those words (or a variation thereof) over and over again in early 1996, as we met new people in our adopted hometown of Rockford, Illinois.
  • The Tragedy of Richard Nixon
    Reviews
    August 03, 2017

    The Tragedy of Richard Nixon

    Pat Buchanan’s new biography of Richard Nixon’s presidency is the first volume anyone looking at that tumultuous time should turn to. Having served as Nixon’s researcher and speechwriter starting in 1966, Buchanan, not yet 30, followed the...
  • Managerial Suicide
    Editorials
    June 29, 2017

    Managerial Suicide

    It is increasingly clear that the public and political class of Western countries is simply inadequate to the job of fighting terrorism.
  • Corporate Responsibility: An Indecent Proposal
    Society & Culture
    June 29, 2017

    Corporate Responsibility: An Indecent Proposal

    This past semester a group of bored yet curious students at my university invited faculty to participate in a lunch-hour debate. When the organizers first contacted me they referenced several of my former students who praised my heretical...
  • <em>Books in Brief</em>
    Reviews
    June 29, 2017

    Books in Brief

    This is an excellent and very readable book about the life and work of a man with whose name every educated person is familiar, but about whom (and which) few people in America today know very much, though his 100th birthday in 1869, only a...
  • The Reminiscences of Earl Wild
    Column
    June 29, 2017

    The Reminiscences of Earl Wild

    I was thinking recently about Earl Wild for several reasons: his achievement as a pianist; his substantial and extended contribution to the “Romantic Revival” through his performances and recordings; and my own memories of exchanges with him...
  • Travel Ban, and Beyond
    Column
    June 29, 2017

    Travel Ban, and Beyond

    The Supreme Court decided on June 26 to allow key parts of the Trump administration’s “travel ban” to go into effect temporarily. This was an unexpected victory for the President—and for common sense.
  • If It Leads, It Bleeds
    Column
    June 29, 2017

    If It Leads, It Bleeds

    The bonds that bind us together as a nation are fraying, and this is by design. Divide and rule is the byword of the “Resistance,” but they are banking on a victory that isn’t necessarily in the cards.
  • Wonders
    Column
    June 29, 2017

    Wonders

    Wonder Woman is the first installment of what threatens to be an endless line of sequels. Patty Jenkins directed the movie, an odd choice. Ms. Jenkins directed Monster in 2003, a sympathetic feminist treatment of serial killer Aileen Wuornos, a...
  • Liberals With Money to Burn
    Column
    June 29, 2017

    Liberals With Money to Burn

    Free expression is a double-edged sword. As long as it’s left-wing it should be free, at least according to György Porgie.
  • Snuffed Candle
    Editorials
    June 29, 2017

    Snuffed Candle

    Proclaimed political “dynasties” in American history have never persisted beyond two generations. The Adams family produced two presidents in two generations, followed by an author of significant accomplishments who disdained democracy and never...
  • Losers Double Down
    Editorials
    June 29, 2017

    Losers Double Down

    The party of Hillary Clinton has not stopped losing since last November. This fact is easily overlooked amid all of President Trump’s bad press, but Democrats have reliably come up short in special elections from Montana to Kansas to suburban...
  • The Meaning of Donald Trump
    In Our Time
    June 29, 2017

    The Meaning of Donald Trump

    When one considers the extent and weight of the now-globalized opposition arrayed against him, the fact that Donald Trump should have any solid accomplishments at all to his credit is astonishing, as Susan Rice admits.
  • The Cottingley Fairies, and Fatima
    Correspondence
    June 29, 2017

    The Cottingley Fairies, and Fatima

    Arthur Conan Doyle once wrote that the idea of an acceptable form of public entertainment underwent a rude shock in the years around World War I. By then in his mid-50’s, he had abandoned any pretense of sympathy for modern culture.
  • Man Up
    Column
    June 29, 2017

    Man Up

    Mike Madigan (so the rumor goes) will never leave the Illinois House of Representatives, or even risk vacating the speaker’s chair, because doing so would almost certainly set him on the path trodden by four of the last eight governors of Illinois.
  • Splendid Dishonesty
    Reviews
    June 29, 2017

    Splendid Dishonesty

    Stephen B. Presser, Chronicles’ legal-affairs editor, identifies a crisis in American legal education. In his book Law Professors, he shows us why a newly minted graduate of an elite American law school has no clue how to handle a case or...
  • <em>What the Editors Are Reading</em>
    Reviews
    June 29, 2017

    What the Editors Are Reading

    A casual mention by a friend of The Magnificent Ambersons, the novel by the Midwestern American novelist and playwright Booth Tarking ton (1869-1946) translated to the silver screen by Orson Welles, sent me to my library to renew my acquaintance...
  • The Inevitability of National Politics
    Column
    June 29, 2017

    The Inevitability of National Politics

    Many conservatives have become disenchanted with national politics. This disenchantment is understandable. Strong support for Republicans seeking the White House and seats in Congress has done little to conserve the type of society most of...
  • If We Cared About “Democracy”
    Editorials
    June 29, 2017

    If We Cared About “Democracy”

    Democracy is under attack, we now hear regularly. While Donald Trump, the GOP, and (if you ask Rachel Maddow) the weather have all been identified of late as “threats” to our democracy, the Great Satan is, of course, Russia, pop. 144,498,215.
  • Immeasurable Loss
    Polemics & Exchanges
    June 29, 2017

    Immeasurable Loss

    My thanks to Aaron D. Wolf for his article “The Discarded Image.” It reminded me of G.K. Chesterton’s “The Age of America,” published in The Illustrated London News, December 14, 1929 (The Collected Works of G.K. Chesterton, Vol. 35).
  • The End of Something
    Reviews
    June 29, 2017

    The End of Something

    Kirchick is correct in seeing “the end” of something in Europe. The post-1989 policies of the European elites—which the neoconservatives supported—have brought the Continent to this point.
  • A Long Way Behind
    Reviews
    June 29, 2017

    A Long Way Behind

    Yale’s Little Histories represent an admirable project, whereby true experts perform the exceedingly difficult task of summarizing a large field of knowledge in a short space, and in an accessible manner.
  • The Real McCoy
    Column
    June 29, 2017

    The Real McCoy

    In the early 1950’s when my family got our first TV set—it had a whopping 12" screen with a green tint—we kids tuned in to The Tim McCoy Show, which aired early Saturday evenings on a local Los Angeles station, KTLA, Channel 5.
  • Humane But Not Tame
    Polemics & Exchanges
    June 29, 2017

    H