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Frankly, My Dear...

Frankly, My Dear...
buried beside him. One must have\r\nfaith, but haunting me is the endless\r\njourney, faster than the speed\r\nof Hght, of the soul into infinit)-.\r\n(There is still much speculation about\r\nwhether Alan Clark converted to Catholicism\r\njust before he died; he was an\r\nunexpectedly religious man, who often\r\nmentions God in the Diaries.)\r\nHis book ends on a high note, with\r\nClark v\\Titing of his October 1982 visit to\r\nthe Falklands, which he describes as "the\r\nmost memorable and invigorating experience\r\nof my entire Parliamentary career."\r\nSuch moments of unadulterated delight\r\nwere all too rare in a career full of cares\r\n(usually self-inflicted), conspiracies (usually\r\nunsuccessful), and compromise\r\n(usual). Yet, when he was out of Parliament\r\nbetween 1995 and 1997, all he\r\ncould think about was how to get back in.\r\nBv then, he had long since given up any\r\nidea of doing anything; he just wanted\r\none more go at playing the "game."\r\nDerek iunier is the editor of Right Now!,\r\npublished in London.\r\nFrankly, My Dear\r\nby J.O.Tate\r\nThe Wind Done Gone\r\nby Alice Randall\r\nNew York: Houghton Mifflin;\r\n208 pp., $22.00\r\nThe publication of Gone With the\r\nWind in 1936 was a major event in\r\npublishing —if not literary —history,\r\ncompounded by the overblown movie of\r\n1939 and by worldwide sales that continue\r\nto this day. Margaret Mitchell was\r\noverwhelmed b\\' the reaction, which was\r\ncomplex and multifold. The novel was\r\nread...

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