Tom Landess

A true man of letters, Dr. Tom Landess (1931-2012) wrote (and ghostwrote) hundreds of books and articles, as well as poetry.  He was a student and friend of many of the Twelve Southerners and a brilliant storyteller.  He will be missed tremendously. 

Latest by Tom Landess in Chronicles

Results: 39 Articles found.
  • November 2009

    Race and Racism: A Brief History

    Today, many Americans presume that the debate over slavery in the 18th and 19th centuries turned on the question of race. Though race was an ingredient in the Great Debate, it was no more than a pinch of salt.

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  • Another Reason Why the Agrarians Lost
    July 2009

    Another Reason Why the Agrarians Lost

    Andrew Lytle’s “The Hind Tit” is the best essay in I’ll Take My Stand (1930), not only because it focuses on the small, independent farmer, the class the Agrarians most admired, but also because Lytle nails the volume’s primary thesis to the church door, the dilemma his region and nation faced in 1930—the choice between virtue and practicality.

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  • June 2009

    Marvin “Popcorn” Sutton, R.I.P.

    When Popcorn Sutton died in mid-March at the age of 62, the national press ran obituaries. Though he was just an old moonshiner who’d plied his trade for half a century and done nothing else of consequence, a whole bunch of folks in Tennessee and North Carolina grieved more than they would have over the death of a military hero, movie star, or ex-president.

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  • Homage To a Friend
    February 2009

    Homage To a Friend

    Years ago, when a Vanderbilt graduate-school party was careening toward promiscuity, a quiet young woman, an English major, suddenly shocked everyone by saying, “Tell you what let’s do: Let’s all name the books we’ve never read.”

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  • Envy and the Consumerism of the Have—Nots
    January 2009

    Envy and the Consumerism of the Have—Nots

    You can make a good argument that, by the late 20th century, the Seven Deadly Sins had become the Seven Lively Virtues. In the 1960’s, the media lauded the anger of students who bombed police stations and set dormitories on fire. Hollywood glorified lust the way it had once glorified chastity.

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  • Perspectives on RPW
    September 2008

    Perspectives on RPW

    The late Mark Winchell’s recently published Robert Penn Warren: Genius Loves Company is a collection of essays focusing on Warren’s close associations and literary affinities.

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  • Robert Frost: The Definitive Work
    April 2008

    Robert Frost: The Definitive Work

    During much of the 20th century, Robert Frost was widely regarded as our greatest living poet. Yet the Frost poems that students used to read in college English classes were those more easily accessible: “Mending Wall,” “Birches,” “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening.”

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  • With Malice Toward Many: Washington, Lincoln, and God
    December 2007

    With Malice Toward Many: Washington, Lincoln, and God

    Most Americans in the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries believed in the public expression of religious sentiments as surely as they believed in publicly proclaiming their patriotism. Such expression was not merely their right; it was their duty.

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  • Agrarians, Greenies, and Goreites
    November 2007

    Agrarians, Greenies, and Goreites

    Since its publication in 1930, I’ll Take My Stand has never been out of print, and each succeeding generation produces new disciples, though sometimes with a slightly different take on the original document.

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  • Sex, Propaganda, and Higher Education
    September 2007

    Sex, Propaganda, and Higher Education

    Over the past few years, college administrators and faculty committees have been tackling a relatively new ethical question raised on campuses across the nation: What about sex between faculty members and students?

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  • Harry Jaffa and the Historical Imagination
    January 2007

    Harry Jaffa and the Historical Imagination

    In the 1970’s, Mel Bradford and I were teaching at the University of Dallas, which offered a doctoral program in politics and literature. Students took courses in both disciplines. It was a well-designed curriculum and produced some first-rate scholars.

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  • It's Hard Times, Cotton Mill Girls
    October 2006

    It's Hard Times, Cotton Mill Girls

    Historians tend to make the same argument: The South lost the Civil War because its economy was agrarian rather than industrial, with too few munitions factories to supply Confederate troops with weapons and too few textile mills to clothe them.

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  • It’s Hard Times, Cotton Mill Girls
    October 2007

    It’s Hard Times, Cotton Mill Girls

    Historians tend to make the same argument: The South lost the Civil War because its economy was agrarian rather than industrial, with too few munitions factories to supply Confederate troops with weapons and too few textile mills to clothe them.

    Read More
  • The Supreme Court, Globalization, and the Teaching of Religion
    September 2006

    The Supreme Court, Globalization, and the Teaching of Religion

    Public figures talk about globalization as if it were the Rapture. We are told that, unlike Marco Polo and Christopher Columbus, we live in an era of international trade; so these days, we must worry more about what the world thinks and does.

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  • An American Dilemma
    July 2006

    An American Dilemma

    In 1976, the Episcopal Church, U.S.A., met in General Convention to consider, among other things, two questions: the adoption of a new Book of Common Prayer and the ordination of women.

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  • Outgrowing the Past
    January 2006

    Outgrowing the Past

    When the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in the case of Kelo v. City of New London, a chill wind blew across the rural South.

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  • The Old South, the New South, and the Real South
    November 2005

    The Old South, the New South, and the Real South

    In April 1968, the University of Dallas Literature Department hosted an Agrarian reunion. We invited John Crowe Ransom, Robert Penn Warren, Allen Tate, Andrew Lytle, and Donald Davidson to come together in several private sessions to discuss the history and meaning of I'll Take My Stand.

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  • November 2005

    Drifting Away

    As America drifts away from orthodox religious belief, God becomes less and less personal and more and more political. The secular world surrounds and absorbs the spiritual.

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  • December 2000

    Pietas and the Southern Agrarians

    Pietas—the ancient virtue of respect for family, country, and God—is becoming increasingly difficult to practice in a nation driven half mad by guilt. Our nation's past, once uncritically revered, is now uncritically condemned.

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Results: 39 Articles found.



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