Chilton Williamson Jr.

Chilton Williamson, Jr., was the senior editor for books for Chronicles since 1989, and was appointed as editor beginning June 1, 2015.  He is the author of several books, including Mexico Way, The Education of Hector Villa, The Hundredth Meridian, The Immigration MystiqueThe Conservative Bookshelf, and After Tocqueville: The Promise and Failure of Democracy. His latest book, Jerusalem, Jerusalem (Chronicles Press), released in 2017.

Latest by Chilton Williamson Jr. in Chronicles

Results: 572 Articles found.
  • June 2019

    Books in Brief

    In this second volume of the Age of the French Revolution series, first published in 1978, Manceron explores the influence on Europe of both American democratic thought and politics during the American Revolution and early nationalist periods.

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  • May 2019

    The Winds of Time

    The wind roared all night, darkness in furious motion that yet held solidly in place. It was still gusting hard when Harlan Edmonds’ Dodge pickup pulled into the drive beside the house at ten in the morning and stopped behind my Ford standing with the tailgate fastened in place against a full load.

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  • May 2019

    In This Number

    Here at the beginning of the May issue, I am pleased to introduce a new feature, In This Number, which will henceforth introduce each new issue of Chronicles.

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  • Bodio’s Country
    May 2019

    Bodio’s Country

    Stephen Bodio is a memoirist, journalist, critic, sportswriter, naturalist, outdoorsman, hunter, falconer, bird breeder, dog breeder, and now a novelist.

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  • May 2019

    Books In Brief

    The French dislike what they call “Anglo-American economics” even more than they dislike English and American cookery; also, more recently, progressive Anglo-American views regarding the supposed identicality between the sexes.

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  • May 2019

    What the Editors Are Reading

    Always keen to read travel books about Mexico, I picked up an elderly copy (printed by A. Appleton & Company in 1921) of Viva Mexico! by Charles Macomb Flandrau that I came across in a local bookshop.

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  • May 2019

    The Crisis in the Anglosphere

    Pro-democratic ideological think tanks that evaluate the future of democracy by the extent of its global spread and the fortunes of relatively insignificant countries around the world should be far more concerned with events currently occurring in . . . in Westminster and . . . the United States of America.

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  • April 2019

    Books In Brief

    It is expected of an author that he say something new and big about someone or something new and big, even should it have been so for two years already. President Trump remains something new and big, though his detractors by now appear old and small.

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  • April 2019

    The U.S. and the E.U.

    Washington never made any particular secret of its jaundiced view of Brexit as suggested succinctly by President Obama when he warned that Great Britain, if she voted to leave the European Union, would need to go to “the back of the queue” of countries wishing to cut trading deals with the United States.

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  • The Thousand Faces of “Me”
    April 2019

    The Thousand Faces of “Me”

    In 1976 New York published a lengthy essay, “The ‘Me’ Decade and the Third Great Awakening,” by the reporter and novelist Tom Wolfe, who died last year, aged 88. Wolfe argued that mass prosperity in the postwar era had erased the historical American proletariat and replaced it with a lower-middle class whose members, exaggeratedly aware of their status as individuals, formed a national culture centered on the quest for self-development and self-perfection.

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  • April 2019

    What the Editors Are Reading

    When I was in my middle teens I read all or most of Sinclair Lewis’s work. It seems impossible, but it is a fact nevertheless that Main Street will be a century old next year, and Babbitt in 2022.

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  • March 2019

    Books in Brief

    This is the second volume of the author’s biography of Saul Bellow, a massive and no doubt definitive work, minutely researched and very well written.

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  • Homage to Edward Abbey
    March 2019

    Homage to Edward Abbey

    The March issue of Chronicles coincides with the 30th anniversary of the passing of novelist, essayist, poet, and conservationist Edward Abbey.

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  • March 2019

    What the Editors Are Reading

    I’m rereading large portions of Ed Abbey’s books (of course) as Chronicles goes to press: Desert Solitaire, Black Sun and The Fool’s Progress (both novels), Abbey’s Road, One Life at a Time, Please, Down the River, Beyond the Wall, The Journey Home . . .

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  • March 2019

    Blackface—and White

    Dr. Ralph Northam, the Democratic governor of Virginia, aetat. 59, is under enormous pressure to resign his position after a conservative website revealed the fact that his page in his medical school yearbook from 1984 carries a photograph of two men, one in blackface and the other in the robes of the KKK, standing side by side.

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  • Trump and the Right
    March 2019

    Trump and the Right

    It seems that a part of Donald Trump’s base—the part that writes and otherwise comments on him, anyway—is angry with the President for having reopened the portions of the federal government he had shut down for 35 days after failing to obtain congressional funding for his Big Beautiful Wall.

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  • Designer Asylum
    February 2019

    Designer Asylum

    Because of the Internet, old-fashioned travel agents are nearly as obsolete as ocean-going passenger liners. In their place a new sort of agent is arising: the migrant or asylum agent, formerly known as the people smuggler.

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  • What Is Populism?
    February 2019

    What Is Populism?

    Dining out with my wife in a restaurant in Paris recently, I became aware of the well-dressed Frenchman seated with his wife two tables away from us listening in on our conversation. The table for two between us was unoccupied.

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  • The Iceberg Cometh
    February 2019

    The Iceberg Cometh

    Throughout the Introduction and into the first chapter of Ship of Fools you seem to be seated before a television screen listening to, and watching, Tucker Carlson in his nightly broadcast.

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  • February 2019

    Books in Brief

    Here is no doubt the best, most comprehensive, most politically balanced and appropriately distanced of the now four notable biographies of Charles de Gaulle.

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Results: 572 Articles found.



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