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Who Decided? And When Did They Decide?

That collecting “the wretched refuse of the earth” was a good thing for the country?  (Certainly, the Founders of the U.S. did not think so.)

That some people should receive special rewards and  preferences because of the assumed sufferings  of their ancestors? (Most of our ancestors suffered. And many of the beneficiaries, not surprisingly, are ungrateful and demand more.)

That Cultural Marxism should be the primary doctrine taught in American institutions of higher education?

That the “conservative” party should nominate a member of a strange religious cult for President?

That unelected financiers of dubious ethics and patriotism would become the true sovereigns (the final, unappealable power) in the U.S. government? (Too Big to Jail; to whom all other interests must be sacrificed.) And that the Secretary of the Treasury who rescued and rewarded the sovereigns for their evil deeds is  to be considered a national hero?

That in order to transact business with a corporation in my own country, which my forebears on both sides helped to found in the 17th century, I must strain to understand  an alien mentality  speaking incomprehensible  subcontinental  English?

That most American college students these days are unable read a 1931 high school anthology of American literature that I have on my desk? (Many would give up on at the first page complaining that too much was being demanded of them.)

That in my own country I should barely escape serious injury when my vehicle is rear-ended by a carload of inebriated Mexicans? (Uninsured, of course)

That the U.S. would become essentially a one-party state? (The Founders hoped for a no-party state, which is something else altogether.)

That killing peasants with high-tech weapons in remote lands would be considered the same as defending America and defending freedom? And that merely questioning this premise would bring down a ton of  hatred from “patriots”?

That “family” could mean Two Mommies?

That newspaper editors and clergymen would go from being well-educated and independent-minded leaders of their local communities to ignorant clones all blabbing the same empty abstractions.

That the ruling class of the U.S. would be mostly made up of  intellectually andn orally shallow people who have never done an honest day’s work? And that  their public discourse would never rise above puerile pseudo-intellectualism?

That my high-scoring children could not be admitted to my alma mater, unlike a recent immigrant from Sierra Leone?

That the collapse of the Soviet Union would not bring joy and an easing of burdens, a peace dividend, but a renewed campaign to make self-liberated Russia an enemy.

That moral depravity, rather than hiding in corners here and there, would become the standard fare of entertainment and politics?

Clyde Wilson

Clyde Wilson

Clyde N. Wilson is a contributing editor to Chronicles. A retired professor of history at the University of South Carolina, he is the author of numerous books, including Carolina Cavalier: The Life and Mind of James Johnston Pettigrew and Defending Dixie: Essays in Southern History and Culture. He is the editor of The Papers of John C. Calhoun.

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