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Trump Election: Democracy Versus Populism

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There are at least three striking facts in Mr. Trump’s election.

First there is the geographic distribution of voters: Roughly speaking the East and West coasts voted against Mr. Trump. Then there is the charge leveled at him: He’s a “populist,” whereas Mrs. Clinton is a faithful democrat (no pun intended), a charge supported by demonstrators claiming Trump’s triumph to be a breach of democracy. And thirdly, had the sheer numbers of voters been decisive, Mrs. Clinton would have been elected.

Now, what are the main components of the population of both coasts? Roughly speaking again, first there is the “elite”: the money-making George Soros, Bill Gates, Warren Buffet et al., and the politicians supported by the norm-hating, deviance-loving intelligentsia, all exhibiting their bleeding hearts and their longing for open societies so that they can attract voters. And second, supporting this elite, there is the ever growing crowd of would-be welfare recipients, all too happy to live off the ever heavier tax burden levied on the middle classes (as in “Taxachusetts”).

Adding the first and second points, you suddenly behold what democracy actually is, as contrasted with populism. Democracy is just a tool in the hands of a more or less hidden “elite,” organizing disorder so as to monopolize power, while distributing the wealth accumulated by the common man to their would-be electors. And populism, a derogatory term, is used to define the real people, the hard-working people, unashamed of their creeds, asking for no help other than to be defended against cheap labor unfairly provided by illegal immigrants.

What a lesson! Thank you, Mr. Trump! And hail to the Founding Fathers, oh so wary of direct democracy!

 

[Image credit: By Transition 2017 [CC BY 4.0]]

Claude Polin

Claude Polin

Claude Polin (1937-2018) was professor emeritus of philosophy at the University of Paris-Sorbonne. He was a French political, academic and essayist philosopher. Legitimist royalist, he was a specialist in totalitarianism and liberalism, of which he was also an opponent.

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