Chronicles Magazine Politcs

The Broken Promise of American Cities

There is a saying used in California when the going gets tough: “At least we have the weather.” No matter how expensive, dangerous, unclean, and generally inhospitable the state’s cities become, “at least we have the weather,” Californians say,...

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  • REVIEWS

    We Ought to Like Ike

    As a second-year West Point cadet in March 1969, I was returning to my room after chemistry class midafternoon on a Friday. As I stepped inside Pershing Barracks, I saw a number of cadets huddled around a note posted on the stairway railing.

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  • Heresies

    Democracy and Infanticide

    During the polar vortex of 2019 the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act had its day in the United States Senate but, thanks to the opposition of Democrats, failed to meet the required number of votes necessary to end debate and call the...

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  • Correspondence

    Culture Wars!

    The bitter war of words that has taken place the best part of this past year between France and Italy culminated in the French government taking the extraordinary step of withdrawing its ambassador to Rome in February.

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  • REVIEWS

    No Justice, No Peace

    There is no pleasing Duke University law professor Brandon L. Garrett, author of the death-penalty-abolishment screed End of Its Rope: How Killing the Death Penalty Can Revive Criminal Justice, though much about the current state of criminal...

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  • REVIEWS

    Replacement Theories

    In 2004, Dutch political scientist Cas Mudde published The Populist Zeitgeist, an attempt to define the growingly important but haphazardly applied concept of “populism.” He had an emotional as well as an academic interest, because “far-right”...

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  • Society & Culture

    Happy Warriors

    For decades, conservative commentators and writers have told anyone who would listen that America is going to hell in a handbag. James Burnham’s Suicide of the West, John Derbyshire’s We Are Doomed, Pat Buchanan’s Suicide of a Superpower, Mark...

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  • REVIEWS

    Nationalism: More to Learn

    However much they may enjoy watching Captain von Trapp sing “Edelweiss” in The Sound of Music, most Catholic intellectuals nowadays are squeamish about delving too deeply into the production’s historical background.

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  • REVIEWS

    Chief of Men

    Of the making of books about Churchill there is no end. The latest is the best to date. Andrew Roberts reduces Churchill’s epic life to some 1,100 pages, offering a précis of the great events in which he was involved while drawing on 40 new...

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  • VIEWS

    The Fatherland and the Nation

    Allen Tate, in 1952, argued that the first duty of the man of letters in the postwar world was to purify the language from the corruptions introduced by ideology and the destruction, more than physical, wrought by the recent world war.

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  • IN OUR TIME

    What Is Populism?

    Dining out with my wife in a restaurant in Paris recently, I became aware of the well-dressed Frenchman seated with his wife two tables away from us listening in on our conversation. The table for two between us was unoccupied.

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  • Correspondence

    What Beto Revealed

    For Texas conservatives, a surprisingly strong showing by Democrats in their deep-red state in November’s midterm election was an unexpected wake-up call. The results also set me to thinking about my own personal history with the Lone Star State.

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  • EDITORIALS

    AOC and GOP Suicide

    As the new Congress was sworn in early in January, the Republican Party unveiled a plan for its own assisted suicide. In fact, Mitt Romney got started before he was even seated as the latest senator from Utah.

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  • EDITORIALS

    Tucker Carlson’s Firebell

    Tucker Carlson shook the punditariat, liberal and conservative alike, with his incisive analysis, delivered during one of his show monologues, of the breakdown of the American family, a genuine four-alarm crisis that cannot be exaggerated.

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  • IN OUR TIME

    Seize No Day

    When one is tired of London, said Dr. Johnson, one is tired of life. I spent a week in London last November, a city I have visited many times and know well having lived a year there with my family while I was growing up.

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  • Heresies

    Ignoble Savages, Part 1

    Hardly anyone thought much about the mysterious inhabitants of North Sentinel Island, whom we call the Sentinelese (because we have no idea what else to call them), until the close of November in the Year of Our Lord 2018.

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  • REVIEWS

    The Faults of Woodward and Trump

    There’s a lot of buncombe in Bob Woodward’s Fear: Trump in the White House. Doubtless Chronicles readers heard some of it when the book was released on September 13, as the mainstream media played and replayed on the hour reports of Chief of...

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  • REVIEWS

    The Empty Plinth

    With the Midterm Elections safely behind us, should we count on the left to renounce the fun of castigating nonleft types for their racism, sexism, and hetero normativism? Not on a bet.

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  • REVIEWS

    Displaced Persons

    In an age of anti-elite anger, it might seem otiose to publish an academic analysis of aristocratic ideas in Western thought. But as the post-1945 order rattles itself to pieces, it is time to look past its bankrupted beliefs and discredited...

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  • City of Westminster

    Deal or No Deal

    David Cameron, the former Prime Minister, once mocked his fellow Tories for “banging on about Europe.” He meant that the European Union had become a tedious right-wing obsession—the root of all governmental problems, the enemy without, the...

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  • BETWEEN THE LINES

    Muse of Apollo

    Is it really necessary to explain why President Trump’s proposed Space Force would be a boon to humankind? Do I have to contrast such a noble project with the other possible uses to which our tax dollars would be put?

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  • EDITORIALS

    Reform Now!

    The left can nearly always be relied upon to recognize a new and unprecedented situation when it arises, and to propose that it be met resolutely and “creatively,” as it likes to say. The exceptions come when holding fast to the status quo and...

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  • EDITORIALS

    May, Macron—TRUMP

    Immediately after Emmanuel Macron was elected president of France in May 2017, progressive Americans fairly swooned with envy. If only they could have a president like M. Macron: young, handsome, progressive, cosmopolitan, polished, globally...

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  • BETWEEN THE LINES

    Using the N-word

    At a raucous campaign rally in Houston, President Trump laid his ideological cards on the table for all to see. If the Democrats take the House and/or the Senate, he told the crowd, they’ll carry out the agenda of “corrupt, power-hungry globalists.”

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  • EDITORIALS

    Six Midterm Reflections

    As the Midterm Election returns came in, one thing became clear: There would be no “blue wave.” The Democrats secured the House of Representatives, though not by a wide margin, and the Republicans held the Senate, gaining a few seats.

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  • EDITORIALS

    The Mightiest Midterm Win

    As the Midterm Apocalypse was sliced and diced on the Day After, pundits noted the “Kavanaugh Effect,” whereby Senate Democrats who joined in the smear-and-delay campaign against then-nominee Brett Kavanaugh lost their bids for reelection in...

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  • EDITORIALS

    Middle Eastern Blood and Dirt

    For over three years Saudi Arabia has been fighting a war in Yemen with little regard for civilian suffering. The war itself has been deadly for thousands of bystanders, but far worse has been the famine the conflict has brought about, which has...

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  • Correspondence

    The Patriot

    Italian journalists are forbidden these days from using the Italian word for foreign migrants who have stolen their way by subterfuge into Italy. By controlling which words people can use you can control their thought. It is a thoroughly fascist...

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  • Society & Culture

    Our Inner Mason-Dixon

    About a hundred years before the Civil War, two British surveyors, Jeremiah Mason and Charles Dixon, with a crew of ax-men, marked out 270 miles of wilderness. They set a stone at every mile, and another grander one embossed with the arms of the...

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  • Short Views

    Thanks, Christine

    The ugliness displayed by the media and Democrats during the fight over Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court is yet another indicator of how far we have come from Hamilton’s conception of the federal judiciary as “the least...

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  • City of Westminster

    Existential Threat

    At present, two themes dominate British political news. One is Brexit, which never ends. The other is antisemitism in the Labour Party, which sucks up enormous amounts of media oxygen. It is not clear how much the public cares that much about...

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  • THE AMERICAN INTEREST

    An American Non-Hero

    Sen. John McCain’s death at 81 on August 25 was followed by effusive praise from everyone who is anyone in the Permanent State. His memorial service at Washington’s National Cathedral on September 1 confirmed that, inside the Beltway, even death...

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  • IN OUR TIME

    The Enemy of the People

    Of all the epithets Donald Trump has delivered over the last 24 months (“Mexican immigrant thieves and rapists,” “shithole countries,” the “Mueller Witch Hunt,” etc.), none has provoked greater outrage on the part of liberals than his...

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  • Correspondence

    The Establishment

    We need a word for the forces that govern our lives. Establishment, a term popularized by Henry Fairlie in the 1950’s, is common currency. He meant by it “the whole matrix of official and social relationships within which power is exercised.”

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  • VIEWS

    Fascism, Real and Imagined

    Twenty years ago I somehow managed to get my act together and get out of Paris, where I had haunted a cheap hotel for a year in the wake of the death of Princess Diana like the ghost of the Marlon Brando character in Last Tango in Paris.

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  • IN OUR TIME

    I Hate

    A book faces me across the room from a bookcase in my office. It has a blood-red and black cover. The author’s name is printed in black down the upper part of the spine and the title in white below that.

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  • BETWEEN THE LINES

    Schizophrenic Citizens

    The very idea of dual citizenship is downright absurd. It’s a contradiction that cannot be resolved. The concept of citizenship is based on the expectation of loyalty to the country, and this, in turn, means that citizens owe their exclusive...

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  • REVIEWS

    Ask Jeeves

    Some of the best-loved characters in English literature are observed only dimly through the eyes of an unreliable first-person narrator; like fish seen through the glass of a tank, they swim toward us, momentarily dazzling in their colors, before...

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  • REVIEWS

    The Truth About Hungary

    I met Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbàn in May of last year. With a few others, we shared breakfast before the opening session of the second Budapest Demographic Forum. He was every bit the “footballer” I had been told to expect.

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  • REVIEWS

    Law and Liberty

    Let’s say that a state passed a statute proscribing teachers from teaching reading in a language other than English until the student had passed the eighth grade. Violation of the statute was a misdemeanor.

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  • THE AMERICAN INTEREST

    Erdogan Unleashed

    A successful national leader (“good” or “bad”) is able to redefine the terms of what is politically possible in accordance with his values, and to produce durable desired outcomes. Lincoln, FDR, and Reagan come to mind at home, and Churchill, De...

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  • EDITORIALS

    The Libertarian Trajectory

    NeverTrump really means “forever war.” Proof of this could be seen in the 2016 election, where anti-Trump Republicans fielded a candidate of their own, ex-CIA man Evan McMullin, rather than casting their votes for a third-party ticket with two...

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  • Correspondence

    The Siege of Sweden

    In an era of political correctness, “safe spaces,” and “trigger warnings” for the constitutionally feeble, there are plenty of things we are not supposed to talk about. Increasingly in recent months, this seems to include crime and immigration...

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  • IN OUR TIME

    One Nation Divided

    Since 1892, when the original text was composed, the Pledge of Allegiance has been revised three times. Viewed chronologically, the alterations appear to have aimed at a greater specificity, but also a wider and deeper self-assurance.

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  • Correspondence

    Homesick in America

    “Darlin,’” she said, “I’ll get that. Go ahead and take it.” She was a weathered-looking woman with mousy light brown hair drawn back in a bun and the plain, honest look of one of those faces you see in Depression-era photos from the Dust Bowl,...

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  • REVIEWS

    All About Trump

    Today, all books by liberals really are about President Trump. Such is Playing With Fire: The 1968 Election and the Transformation of American Politics, by MSNBC far-left fake-news host Lawrence O’Donnell.

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  • EDITORIALS

    The Logic of Liberalism

    Writing in this issue of Chronicles, Frank Brownlow, the scholar and literary critic, quotes W.H. Auden as having described logic as “a condition of the world,” like aesthetics and ethics. Auden was right, which makes advanced liberalism’s...

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  • Short Views

    The Great Clarifier

    Not even President Trump’s most ardent admirers would claim that he is a “Great Communicator,” the title bestowed on the last resident of the White House who could plausibly be seen as governing, at least in some respects, as a conservative.

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  • REVIEWS

    Politics Is Policy

    “Drain the swamp!” Donald Trump declared in every campaign speech of 2016. He meant, of course, the Swamp of Washington, D.C., home of the labyrinthine network of centralized bureaucracies that control our lives. It’s also called the Deep State...

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  • THE AMERICAN INTEREST

    Hawks Win

    The Pentagon’s National Defense Strategy, which Defense Secretary James Mattis presented on January 19, envisages aggressive measures to counter Russia and China and instructs the military to refocus on Cold War-style competition with them, away...

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  • Short Views

    The New Deplorables

    After Roy Moore secured the Republican nomination to fill Jeff Sessions’ seat in the U.S. Senate, the Washington Post ran an article claiming that, roughly four decades ago, Moore had dated two teenage girls and asked out a third in front of her...

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  • VIEWS

    Beyond Imagination: Uranium One

    The multilayered story surrounding Uranium One—the former South African, then Canadian, and now Russian company, of which both Bill and Hillary Clinton and their family foundation are the enriched beneficiaries—has all the usual elements of a...

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  • VIEWS

    Trump, NAFTA, and America First

    President Donald Trump has made the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) a cornerstone of his economic policy. Signed into law by Democrat Bill Clinton in 1993 with Republican support, NAFTA created a managed trade...

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  • THE AMERICAN INTEREST

    Trump’s First Year

    A key source of volatility in today’s international system is the propensity of the U.S. government to reject any conventionally ordered hierarchy of American global interests. Washington’s deterritorialized policy of full-spectrum dominance is...

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  • City of Westminster

    Blame Us!

    Only the most delusional limey would deny that, when it comes to popular culture, Britain is downstream from America. In politics, too, we follow your lead. Tony Blair pursued Bill Clinton’s middle way; David Cameron adopted George W. Bush’s...

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  • REVIEWS

    Stupid Is Not Enough

    Annals of the Stupid Party is more than a blistering critique of Republican ineptitude. Wilson is delivering one last two-by-four to the elephant: Donald Trump has taught you how to win again, by confronting such crucial issues as trade and...

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  • REVIEWS

    Choose Your Side

    The first thought that occurred to me upon receiving a review copy of David Garrow’s hefty biography of our former president was, besides its weight (four pounds), how the jacket photograph perfectly expresses what is revealed in 1,084 pages of...

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  • BETWEEN THE LINES

    No Good Deed . . .

    Sheriff Joe Arpaio, hated by the open-borders crowd but loved by those who want to uphold America’s immigration laws, has always been surrounded by controversies—they whirl around him like dust storms in the Arizona desert.

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  • EDITORIALS

    You May Say You’re a Dreamer

    The unconstitutional Obama executive order known as DACA was rescinded by the Trump DOJ on September 5. Even as the courageous and unassuming A.G. Jeff Sessions made the announcement, thousands of tweets painted him as a hood-donning...

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  • Short Views

    Taking a Stand in Warsaw

    With a monument to the 1944 Warsaw Uprising as his backdrop, President Trump delivered a forceful speech on the eve of the G20 Summit, sounding themes that would not be welcome by most other leaders of the world’s most economically powerful...

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  • Breaking Glass

    Remembering the Old Russia

    This Fall marks the centennial of the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution. Although few commentators today are likely to glorify that event or its aftermath, most will assume that the revolution was a regrettable necessity, which swept away a repressive...

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  • The Rockford Files

    Man Up

    Mike Madigan (so the rumor goes) will never leave the Illinois House of Representatives, or even risk vacating the speaker’s chair, because doing so would almost certainly set him on the path trodden by four of the last eight governors of Illinois.

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  • EDITORIALS

    Losers Double Down

    The party of Hillary Clinton has not stopped losing since last November. This fact is easily overlooked amid all of President Trump’s bad press, but Democrats have reliably come up short in special elections from Montana to Kansas to suburban...

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  • Correspondence

    Demolition Day

    The 150th Anniversary (or Sesquicentennial) of Canadian Confederation will be celebrated on July 1. That holiday was traditionally denominated “Dominion Day,” as Canada was officially called “the Dominion of Canada”—a term which has now fallen...

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  • The Rockford Files

    Power to the People!

    If we desire any kind of freedom in our life on this earth—moral, cultural, economic, political—we have to fight to prevent the centralization of power. Struggle is our lot in life; that die was cast long ago, by Adam and Eve in the Garden. The...

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  • REVIEWS

    On Deaf Ears

    President Trump has said that he does not intend to seek to impose our values globally and that it is not our job to engage in “nation building” by attempting to transform entire societies. That is a good start, and a promising sign for the...

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  • REVIEWS

    The Fun of Brexit

    Arron Banks looks out proudly and pugnaciously from the cover of Bad Boys of Brexit like a character in a Hogarth engraving, flanking the equally Hogarthian Nigel Farage in a photo taken as Farage faced the globe’s agog media on the auspicious...

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  • Correspondence

    Race Against Reason

    We are living in a racially charged climate. Problems associated with the relations between the races seem endemic to all areas of our sad and beleaguered culture. Discussions of law enforcement are dominated by the alleged racism of police...

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  • REVIEWS

    The Idolatrous Empire

    Historians of our day have long debated whether ideas or interests are the prime drivers of human decisions. The Hegelian school, which includes neoconservatives and neoliberals, believes the answer is ideas—freedom, democracy, and equality.

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  • Heresies

    Obama and the Cool Kids

    The world will little remember what Barack Obama said during his disappointing presidency, despite his messianic promise and his reputation as rhetor par excellence. His words were not memorable to begin with.

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  • REVIEWS

    Sounding the Trump

    In important ways, a revolutionary process has begun. So argues Ilana Mercer in the best extended analysis yet published of the Trump phenomenon: “Trump is getting an atrophied political system to oscillate” in “an oddly marvelous uprising.”

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  • Society & Culture

    Rise of the Trumps

    Come November, Donald Trump may go down in flames. Or he might continue to surprise and astonish us. But the Trump children, regardless of whether their father is ever again allowed in GOP polite company, are another matter.

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  • EDITORIALS

    The True Source

    Phyllis Schlafly, in the spring of 1973, squared off in debate at Illinois State University against archfeminist Betty Friedan. The subject was the Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution, at the time just a few states short of ratification.

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  • Heresies

    Donald Trump and Conservatism

    Donald Trump has shattered the false consensus of the Republican Party, the hitherto unrecognized tautology that GOP is conservative because conservative is GOP, and vice versa. In the process, we’ve been confronted by an embarrassing reality:...

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  • BETWEEN THE LINES

    Turkey Purge

    Democracy isn’t freedom—and in today’s Turkey some people realize that, as amazing as that may seem. Not ordinary folks, but the mid-level officers of the Turkish army, who have been watching with a jaundiced eye the steady Islamization of their...

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  • Heresies

    We’re All Extremists Now

    The timing of Omar Mateen’s shooting at Orlando’s Pulse nightclub was rotten for the Obama administration, because Secretary of State John Kerry had just published his carefully worded Joint Strategy on Countering Violent Extremism (CVE), in...

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  • Society & Culture

    Beyond Populism

    Donald Trump’s political success dramatizes the nature of today’s politics. On one side we have denationalized ruling elites with absolute faith in their own outlook and very little concern for Americans as Americans.

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  • THE AMERICAN INTEREST

    Strategic Crossroads

    The aftermath of the Cold War has seen the emergence of what Robert Kagan and William Kristol have called “benevolent global hegemony.” The leaders of both major U.S. political parties have asserted that America’s unchallengeable military might...

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  • EDITORIALS

    The Devil You Know

    Abortion is no longer a “necessary evil” or an “unavoidable tragedy” or any of the other phrases designed both to acknowledge and to hide the reality of the act; today, as another Clinton vies for the highest office in the land, abortion is...

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  • EDITORIALS

    Just Don’t Tell the Truth

    U.S. Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-CA) is against requiring women to register for Selective Service in our Brave New Military. Accordingly, he proposed an amendment to the 2017 defense-spending bill that accomplishes the opposite of what he believes.

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  • REVIEWS

    Easy Sell

    Twice a finalist for the Pulitzer, H.W. Brands, in "Reagan: The Life", describes the 40th president as a conservative Franklin Roosevelt. What Roosevelt was to the “first half of the twentieth century, Reagan was to the second half.”

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  • Heresies

    Trumpsteria: Dislike!

    Chaos dominates the political scene today thanks to the success of the Trump campaign and the Trumpsteria that has accompanied it. This chaos is the subject of myriad essays, commentaries, and—most significantly—power grabs both brand new and...

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  • Society & Culture

    Parties

    Contrary to popular belief, political parties are not democratic institutions. They are extraconstitutional instruments of elite control, machines for corralling and pacifying the voters with platitudes.

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  • EDITORIALS

    NR Trumped

    National Review’s February 15 number, “Against Trump,” carries a leading editorial condemning the Republican presidential candidate as a man who “would trash the broad conservative ideological consensus within the GOP in favor of a free-floating...

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  • EDITORIALS

    Trump Vindication

    From the beginning of Donald Trump’s candidacy for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination, I have consistently said that I do not expect him to win the nomination, or, if he does capture it, to win the election.

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  • REVIEWS

    Religion Is Always There

    The varied and complex relations between religion and power can be understood only by means of extensive comparisons, between nations and across time. Who better to demonstrate this than Prof. David Martin, the doyen of the comparative sociology...

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  • REVIEWS

    Flame of Hope

    The 21st century has not so far been a happy time for American conservatives. It began with an appalling terrorist attack whose key perpetrators had taken advantage of our government’s insouciance toward mass immigration from the Third World.

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  • VIEWS

    Dining With The Donald

    When Donald Trump started making noise about running for president, I knew next to nothing about him. Since I don’t watch television, I’m not sure whether I could even have identified him in a lineup.

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  • BETWEEN THE LINES

    Who Hates Trump?

    Politics is all about hatred. Never mind who you’re voting for: It’s who you’re voting against that really counts. And that’s why any disagreement I may have with Donald Trump’s actual policies is completely irrelevant.

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  • REVIEWS

    Two Experiments

    It is a commonplace among American conservatives that, at some point in the past, the way Americans understood their constitutional and cultural tradition diverged from the reality of the constitutional order established in 1787.

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  • Short Views

    Disenchanted With Globalism

    The political story this year was supposed to be a familiar one: A member of the Bush family was going to begin a successful march to the Republican nomination, and a member of the Clinton family was going to do the same thing on the Democratic side.

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  • VITAL SIGNS

    Nuclear Baksheesh

    For several months Republicans and Democrats have been jawing over the nuclear “deal” with Iran. Unlike so many partisan debates, this one may actually involve issues of national security, but only if both sides are serious.

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  • REVIEWS

    Manual Control

    Russian political analyst Vladimir Pastukhov once wrote that state power, or vlast, and not law “holds a sacred status in Russia.” Russians, according to Pastukhov, experience state power as a “mystical entity,” a “life giving substance,” a...

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  • NEWS

    Which KGB?

    Everyone in Moscow knew that the massive demonstration planned for March 1 was in some way meant to be dangerous. The mood harked back to the events that caused the 1917 Revolution, or the troubles on the streets that paved the way for Boris...

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  • Sins of Omission

    An American Sniper

    A galloglass was a professional warrior hired by an Irish chief. The practice of employing such men became common in the decades following the Norman invasion, when it became obvious that heavily armed and mail-clad fighters were needed to...

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  • Short Views

    The Battle for the Middle

    American politicians love to pretend that they care about the middle class, because they know that the middle class generally determines who gets elected. But once elected, politicians tend to serve those who finance their campaigns, and the...

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  • BETWEEN THE LINES

    LBJeb

    You knew Jeb Bush was going to run for president; after all, assuming the worst is really the essence of conservatism. And, sure enough, he’s “actively exploring the possibility”—a half-measure that prefigures the weakness and tepidity of...

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  • REVIEWS

    Idealists Without Illusions

    Like all relationships, the special transatlantic one is in a state of constant flux—warmer or cooler at different times, enhanced by empathy, marred by misunderstandings, riven by reality—but always affected by the personal qualities of the...

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  • Cultural Revolutions

    An Affirmative Action

    The U.S. Supreme Court decision Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action, issued last spring, upheld a 2006 citizen-approved ballot initiative in Michigan to amend the state constitution to ban reverse discrimination in public...

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  • VIEWS

    Watching Is Out—So Watch Out!

    I have been receiving so many requests lately for lifestyle advice, tips on public relations and media etiquette (not to mention recommendations about health and beauty maintenance), that I just haven’t been able to keep up with them all.

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  • VIEWS

    The Missing Opposition

    Although in general not terribly bright, Republican leaders are smart enough to take care of their own power and profits, which was all along their only real goal. The mistake is in assuming that they ever had any ideas or principles to begin with.

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  • Cultural Revolutions

    Perry Potestas

    Rick Perry, believe me, is no more going to prison than I’m going to bounce into his office one fine day to sign him up for an Obama fundraising dinner (an occasion prospectively disadvantageous to the health and well-being of both statesmen,...

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  • Cultural Revolutions

    War on Whites

    Alabama Republican congressman Mo Brooks generated outrage among the usual suspects in early August by telling radio talk-show host Laura Ingraham that the Obama administration’s push for amnesty for illegal immigrants is “a part of the war on...

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  • NEWS

    Subgroup Strife in the Golden State

    It wasn’t supposed to end like this. We were all going to “get along” in a diverse, multicultural paradise, led by our brilliant universities. But in a pattern sure to spread across America, the ethnic strife in California is increasing, not...

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  • REVIEWS

    The Fruits of Fraud

    The worst thing about the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1973 legalization of abortion in all 50 states and U.S. territories has not been the 55 million—and counting—dead babies, as horrible as that has been, but the damage it has caused to the rule of...

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  • VITAL SIGNS

    Country

    Every time I watch the above scene from Gladiator, that powerful movie about the decadence of Roman imperial government, the lamentation of Maximus for the unfulfilled promise of Rome and for the long-defunct republic turns my thoughts to...

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  • NEWS

    Intransigent Diplomacy

    There is a disturbing pattern over the decades in Washington’s negotiations with countries deemed to be adversaries. It is a tendency to adopt a rigid stance marked by unrealistic demands that make achieving a settlement virtually impossible.

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  • Correspondence

    Flyover Math

    In January, George Mason University published a survey of the financial solvency of our country’s 50 states. Illinois came in at 48th place, just in front of Connecticut and New Jersey. The Land of Lincoln caught a bit of a break, it seems.

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  • REVIEWS

    The Uses of American Government

    That the republic has degenerated from a Protestant-inflected localized republic to a centralized bureaucratic imperial state is something most conservatives take for granted. The reason for such a transformation, however, sometimes becomes more...

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  • REVIEWS

    The Person Is Always Becoming

    Everyone in the Western world writes from left to right, so Michael Novak’s title is more cute than revealing. The subtitle, on the other hand, makes a claim: that he moved from at one point in his life being a liberal to an admission that,...

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  • Cultural Revolutions

    Bathroom Break

    On January 1, the state imposed on children Assembly Bill 1266, mandating that all bathrooms, gym showers, and sports teams in public schools be open to everyone, regardless of sex. The bill’s official title is the School Success and Opportunity...

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  • European Diary

    The Dogma in the Manger

    Since 1984, when Nineteen Eighty-Four was published in Russia, I have taken the view that the clever understand what transpires there without need for fresh explanations, while the daft, no matter how ingenious one’s explanations or...

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  • REVIEWS

    Updike's Grandfather

    A poll of American historians, not long ago, chose James Buchanan as “the worst” American president. But judgments of “best” and “worst” in history are not eternal and indisputable truths.

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  • REVIEWS

    One Big Thing

    Devouring Freedom is substantially a useful history of the spending wars between America’s two main political parties since 1932, culminating in the years since 2009 when Barack Obama became president of the United States.

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  • NEWS

    Too Big to Jail

    “Even if you don’t have the authorities—and frankly I didn’t have the authorities for anything—if you take charge people will follow.” So said Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson, Jr., former CEO of Goldman Sachs, to the Washington Post on...

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  • Perspective

    Facts and Opinions

    “I think it’s been very hard for Speaker Boehner and Republican Leader McConnell to accept the fact that taxes on the wealthiest Americans should go up a little bit, as part of an overall deficit reduction package.”

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  • BETWEEN THE LINES

    Neocons in the Dock

    The nomination of Chuck Hagel as secretary of defense has sparked a firestorm of opposition from Israel’s fifth column in the United States. It is a useful example of just how the Jewish state’s parasitic relationship with America works.

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  • REVIEWS

    How We Got Here

    Chilton Williamson’s illuminating enterprise—and let me assure you, it does illuminate—is to examine democracy’s course since the publication, not quite two centuries ago, of Democracy in America.

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  • REVIEWS

    The Magnetic Chain of Humanity

    With respect to the equality proposition, Alvis asserts that the only interpretation of equality consistent with the Declaration as a whole may be concisely expressed, “Government exists for the sake of all the governed.”

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  • REVIEWS

    Maistre in the Dock

    In September 2010, Émile Perreau-Saussine, age 37, was rushed to Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge, U.K., with chest pains. The junior physician on staff misdiagnosed his condition and thus failed to prevent his death hours later of a massive...

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  • American Proscenium

    It's Ryan

    As a Catholic from the Midwest, Ryan embodies the type of voters the GOP ticket must win to capture the White House. It is difficult to see how Romney wins if he fails