Chronicles Magazine r.i.p.

The Broken Promise of American Cities

There is a saying used in California when the going gets tough: “At least we have the weather.” No matter how expensive, dangerous, unclean, and generally inhospitable the state’s cities become, “at least we have the weather,” Californians say,...

Read More
  • In Memoriam

    Sweetness

    Easter 2019 was a vivid reminder that Good Friday still precedes Easter Sunday. The global news machine brought us horrific images of Christians massacred in their churches by Islamic terrorists in Sri Lanka.

    Read More
  • THE AMERICAN INTEREST

    An American Non-Hero

    Sen. John McCain’s death at 81 on August 25 was followed by effusive praise from everyone who is anyone in the Permanent State. His memorial service at Washington’s National Cathedral on September 1 confirmed that, inside the Beltway, even death...

    Read More
  • EDITORIALS

    Capitol Obsequies

    It used to be said of the Anglican Church that it was “the Tory Party at prayer.” On the occasion of Sen. John McCain’s funeral service in Washington National Cathedral last September 1, the United States and the world were given another...

    Read More
  • EDITORIALS

    Tom Wolfe, R.I.P.

    When Tom Wolfe’s debut novel, The Bonfire of the Vanities, was published in November 1987, the book was greeted with effusive praise and became a best-seller, although some literati seemed offended by Wolfe’s highly descriptive prose, the...

    Read More
  • Cultural Revolutions

    Gentle Warrior

    Thomas H. Landess died from a sudden illness on January 9, 2012. He was 80 years old. His death was a shock to his family and his many friends. I last heard from Tom two days before his death, an event that was out of mind, so warm and...

    Read More
  • Cultural Revolutions

    Man of Letters

    Thomas H. Landess, R.I.P.  At 80 Tom was still producing every day more than a day’s worth of versatile work. His sudden passing in January struck like an unexpected calamity that portends the end of an era.

    Read More
  • VIEWS

    Dwight Macdonald

    A Rebel in Defense of Tradition is the title of Michael Wreszin's 1994 biography of Dwight Macdonald (1906- 1982). It is a very good title, by which I mean something more than a "handle"; it is a precise phrase, a summary properly affixed to the...

    Read More
  • Cultural Revolutions

    Diana's Image

    Diana is dead. The sudden and gruesome death of a woman in her prime, especially the mother of adolescent children, is a sad event. With Princess Diana, it has the makings of a real tragedy. She was pushed into a public marriage with an unloving...

    Read More
  • Cultural Revolutions

    Arthur Asher Shenfield, R.I.P.

    Arthur Asher Shenfield died on February 13 at the age of 80. A British lawyer and economist, he spent much of the last three decades as a visiting professor at American colleges and universities, setting forth with rare vigor and clarity the...

    Read More
  • Cultural Revolutions

    Barry Sadler, R.I.P.

    Barry Sadler, the Vietnam veteran who wrote and recorded "The Ballad of the Green Berets," died in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, last November 5. He was 49 years old. Sadler had been shot in the forehead in Guatemala City in September 1988, an...

    Read More
  • Cultural Revolutions

    John William Corrington, R.I.P.

    John William Corrington's early death ended the career of a distinguished and prolific literary figure. His first book appeared in 1961; it was followed by three other books of poetry, numerous novels, and four of the best short story collections...

    Read More
  • Cultural Revolutions

    James Burnham, R.I.P.

    He was a controversialist. As a literary critic he argued with T.S. Eliot, and as a Trotskyist he quarreled with Trotsky himself. Almost alone among the ex-Communists, he made the full journey to a conservative world view, and before his death he...

    Read More