Chronicles Magazine April 2017

Ut Plures Sint

For the last three months I have been asking people at my college what the phrase cultural diversity means, if it does not mean “a diversity of cultures thriving all over the world” or “the study of a broad diversity of cultures spanning four...

Read More
  • REVIEWS

    The End and the Beginning

    Return the printed word to its rightful primacy in your imagination by buying and reading this book. Savor its contents; this remarkable collection of essays will whet your appetite for the next “final” volume from John Lukacs.

    Read More
  • REVIEWS

    The Mystery of Things

    Near the end of Shakespeare’s King Lear, when all seems lost, Lear comforts his daughter Cordelia—like him, soon to die—by telling her that in prison they will contemplate “the mystery of things.” Both in this sense, and in another sense, the...

    Read More
  • Sins of Omission

    Kit Carson

    Though the mountain men were responsible for blazing nearly every trail to the Pacific Coast, discovering the natural wonders of the Trans-Mississippi West, and providing the muscle that fueled the fur trade, few gained national recognition.

    Read More
  • THE AMERICAN INTEREST

    A Coup Most Foul

    We have seen coups of sorts in Washington before, not that anyone one calls them that. (Remember JFK, Nixon.) The one against Trump is of a different order of magnitude. It had been plotted by the Deep State even before he was inaugurated.

    Read More
  • REVIEWS

    Bizarre Baroque

    This elegantly translated, superbly annotated new translation of his Tale of Tales—which Benedetto Croce called “the most remarkable book of the Baroque period”—should . . . be of abounding interest to anyone who has any proprietorial regard for...

    Read More
  • REVIEWS

    Books in Brief

    Messengers of the Right, the author says, “explains how conservative media became the institutional and organizational nexus of the movement, transforming audiences into activists and activists into a reliable voting base.”

    Read More
  • The Music Column

    There Will Be Brahms

    The subject of the Brahms Violin Concerto in D major (Op. 77) is fitting because we are talking about a work that is respected, which is one thing, but also loved, which is more. I had some special times with the Brahms Violin Concerto, even...

    Read More
  • IN THE DARK

    Good Country People

    I first learned about miscegenation in 1958. A student in my high-school religion class asked our teacher, Father Kohler, what he thought about race relations. Would they, he wondered, ever be resolved? The question surprised me.

    Read More
  • UNDER THE BLACK FLAG

    Fakebook News

    Who was it who said that behind every great fortune lies a great crime? The answer is a Frenchman by the name of Balzac, known in his time as a pretty good novelist. Well, is stealing an idea and making untold billions as a result a great crime?

    Read More
  • EDITORIALS

    Wrestling With God

    In the prison yard, we’re told, men who sexually abuse children are given special attention, and not the favorable kind. In Euless, Texas, at a public school that bears the unlikely name Trinity, sexual abuse is a celebrated part of the program.

    Read More
  • Polemics & Exchanges

    Of Familial Optimism

    I was very pleased to see Dr. Carle Zimmerman’s Family and Civilization referenced in Allan Carlson’s “A City on a Hill—With Transgender Toilets?” (View, March). I discovered this book early last year and was amazed by its lessons.

    Read More