Chronicles Magazine February 2004

  • REVIEWS

    The 11th Commandment

    The Geography of Thought is an exercise in cultural polarization that makes two basic claims: There are profound cognitive differences between Westerners and Asians; and these differences have maintained themselves with striking...

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  • REVIEWS

    Mishmash

    To judge from its title, we could reasonably expect this book to be about the growing gulf between women and men. Yet Andrew Hacker, a professor of political science at Queens College, spends much of the book reciting differences between the...

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  • NEWS

    What Empire?

    One tangible effect of all of our recent wars has been a marked proliferation of U.S. military bases around the world. Since the end of the Cold War, the number of countries that host American bases has increased by almost one third, to over 60.

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  • REVIEWS

    A Fig From Smyrna

    Jan Chryzostom Cardinal Korec, S.J., was an eyewitness to the 20th century’s most important event: the defeat of Marxism-Leninism in Eastern Europe by the Church established by Jesus Christ.

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  • REVIEWS

    Shine, Republic

    The America First Committee of 1940-41 was the largest antiwar organization (800,000 members) in American history. Although it was founded by a group of Yale law students in the summer of 1940 and never lost its patrician character, it was...

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  • NEWS

    The Tobin Tax

    A closed-door meeting of nongovernmental organizations (NGO’s) was held on January 16, 2003, in Washington, D.C., to consider how to “reform” “the global financial architecture” in order “to stabilize the world economy, reduce poverty and...

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  • VITAL SIGNS

    Night Moves

    If the recent passage of the $395-billion Medicare prescription-drug bill teaches us anything, it is that just electing more Republicans to the House and Senate accomplishes very little.

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  • IN THE DARK

    Secret Sharers

    Magisterial sea yarner Patrick O’Brian comes to the screen in Peter Weir’s new film, Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World. This is the tale of an early-19-century English frigate’s mad chase after an enemy ship sailing from...

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  • Dictations

    Sounding Brass

    “Charity begins at home” was one of the most telling proverbs in the English language. I say “was” because the English language is deader than Latin, and its post-English/post-American replacement, while it contains sound sequences remarkably...

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  • American Proscenium

    The Dean Delusion

    What is wrong with Howard Dean? Not much, if you listen to many Republicans and some conservatives. Republicans are salivating over the prospect of a Dean nomination because it seems to be the best way to ensure that President Bush stays where...

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  • Cultural Revolutions

    Managed Democracy

    Russia's parliamentary elections, held December 7, produced a wave of alarmed reactions in the Western press that betray the ignorance and hypocrisy of Western elite thinking regarding Russia and the West’s—particularly Washington’s—relations...

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  • Cultural Revolutions

    Imposing Tariffs

    The steel tariff may become a major issue in this year’s presidential campaign, placing Howard Dean in the odd position (for a Democratic candidate, at least) of attacking President Bush for caving in to a decision of an international body—in...

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  • Polemics & Exchanges

    On Guns and Rights

    While I entirely agree with Roger McGrath’s contention in his essay in defense of gun rights that “an armed citizenry is essential to the preservation of freedom and democracy,” I do not agree that “the Second Amendment, like the First,...

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  • Polemics & Exchanges

    On Cleveland

    I am sure that Scott P. Richert, in his review of Bill Kauffman’s Dispatches From the Muckdog Gazette, did not intend to single out my hometown as the standard for the corporate homogenization of America; since he did, however, let me...

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