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Stephen Presser

Stephen B. Presser is the Raoul Berger Professor of Legal History at Northwestern University and the legal-affairs editor of Chronicles.

ARTICLES BY THIS CONTRIBUTOR:
  Donald Trump, the Court, and the Law
  SCOTUS: What to Watch in 2016
  After Obergefell: What Now?
  The Worst Decision
  Government-Managed Business
  Reviewing Judicial Review: A Government of Justices
  Strippers to the Rescue
  How Posner Thinks
  Guantanamo Supreme
  Two American Lives
  A 60-Year-Old Error
  The Guantanamo Question
  No Longer a Constitution?
  Who Pays the “Tort Tax”?
  Judging for the People
  Does the Federal Government Protect Private Property?
  Did the Supreme Court Destroy Property Rights in the Kelo Case?
  Crying “Halt!”
  A Lawyer's Lawyer
  Guantanamo Bay
  My Favorite Justice
  A Hard Case
  Sacred Texts ’98
  A Living Library of the Law Revived
  Champion of American Believers
  Erosion of Democracy
  Marriage and the Law
  The Unbearable Illegitimacy of American Law
  Supreme Court Chaos
  Delayed Decision
  What Would Jefferson Do?
  The Rights of Aliens
  The Federal Courts, a Menorah, and the Ten Commandments
  Metaphors Have Consequences
  A Bad Man’s View of the Law
  Appointing Supreme Court Justices
  “Outside the Box, but Never Outside of the Constitution”
  Taking God Out of School
  A Dissenting Voice
  Jefferson’s Cousin
  The Habitation of Justice
  Interpretative Gymnastics
  What Makes for Real Prosperity?
  Some Dare Call It Justice
  Ideology in Judicial Selection?
  "Borking"
  "We Hold These Truths"
  No Big News
  The Virtues of Property
  A Presidential Pardon
  Don't Fix It Restoring
  The Twilight Zone
  Law, Morality, and Religion
  Can American Legal Education Be Fixed?
  Raoul Berger, R.I.P.
  Unexpected Effect
  Commercial Speech and the First Amendment
  A Closely Watched Term
  The Clinton Scandals
  Clarifying Constitutional Law
  Sensationalizing if Youth Violence
  Dodging A Bullet
  Voucher Plan
  Arbitrary Nature of the Supreme Court
  Our Constitution and Theirs
  Back in the News
  The Teaching Evolution
  Every Neighbor a Litigant
  L'Affaire Lewinsky
  The Court's Current "Conservative" Bloc
  Storytelling
  The Living Constitution and the Death of Sovereignty
  "Visual Politics"
  Politics Make Strange Bedfellows
  The Tribute Which Vice Pays to Virtue
  Sisyphus and States' Rights
  An Extraordinary Suggestion
  Is There Hope for the Federal Courts?
  Recapturing the Constitution