Chronicles Magazine April 2001

The Conservative War on Property

Perhaps it is a delusion, like snow blindness, caused by the tons of dirty snow shoved into my driveway by the city plows and the sun's annual disappearing act that drives even non-Scandinavians into melancholy and occasional fits of berserking...

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  • VIEWS

    For Keeps!

    The language of the Fifth Amendment seems so innocuous—or, rather, it seems a positive good, designed to protect us: "No person shall . . . be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken...

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  • VIEWS

    Civil Rights or Property Rights?

    The interplay of race and economics in America has produced a new variant of political economy that we might call "multicultural capitalism," a system in which property is, for the most part, privately owned, but its ownership is conditional on...

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  • REVIEWS

    Antiquities of the Republic

    Until the triumph of the civil-rights movement at the end of the 1960's, probably the most disruptive and recurrent conflict in American politics came from the struggle between central authority in the federal government and local authority at...

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  • REVIEWS

    "Psst—Can We Talk?"

    There is a story, perhaps apocryphal, about a Chinese scholar who was asked by a student, "What is the longterm impact of the French Revolution?" His answer: "It's too early to tell, it's simply too early to tell."

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  • REVIEWS

    War and Peace, and Politics

    Eugenio Corti is one of the greatest Christian writers of the past half-century. Although he is virtually unknown to the anti-Christian literary establishment in Italy, he is revered not only by conservative Italian Catholics but by...

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  • REVIEWS

    Hogan Forever

    On July 25, 1997, Ben Hogan died in Fort Worth at the age of 85; his widow, Valerie, did not long survive him. In the season of 2000, Tiger Woods smashed scoring records in the U.S. Open, the British Open, and the PGA Championship, winning nine...

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  • Correspondence

    Rome as We Found It

    In horse-and-carriage days, foreign visitors to Rome, after an arduous Alpine crossing, commonly entered the city from the north, by the Milvian Bridge which has existed since the second century B.C. Here, on October 28, 312, Constantine had a...

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  • Cultural Revolutions

    Talks in Belgrade

    Carla del Ponte's talks in Belgrade with President Vojislav Kostunica of Yugoslavia ended abruptly and acrimoniously on January 23. After an hour with Kostunica, an angry-looking Miss Del Ponte, the chief prosecutor of The Hague war-crimes...

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  • Polemics & Exchanges

    On John Locke

    To argue, as Paul Gottfried did in "Distrusting John Locke", that the writings of John Locke were not instrumental to the founding of this country is to suppose that the authors of the Federalist did not know what they were about.

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