Cultural Revolutions

A Heated Topic

The Confederate Flag has become a heated topic this election year. As George W. Bush and John McCain battled in South Carolina for the Republican presidential nomination, the New York Young Republican Club invited Richard Lowry, the editor of National Review, to discuss the Republican Party's prospects for November.

In the question-and-answer session that followed, Mr. Robert Hornak, the club's president, asked Mr. Lowry why the Republican Party did not condemn the Confederate Battle Flag. Alleging the flag was a symbol of treason, sedition, and slavery, Mr. Hornak maintained that, by not condemning it, the GOP alienates black voters, ensuring that they vote Democratic. Mr. Lowry agreed, adding that Republicans don't condemn the Confederate flag because they want the "redneck" vote.

In attacking the flag, both gentlemen unintentionally aid their political opponents. For a more compelling case can be made against the "Stars and Stripes" as a symbol of slavery, treason, and sedition than against the Confederate Battle Flag.

There was no legal right under British law for a colony to secede from the British Empire. The actions of the American revolutionaries, therefore, were treasonous and seditious; their flag was a symbol of treason and sedition.

The Stars and Stripes also symbolizes a country established as a slaveholding republic. When the Declaration of Independence...

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