Chronicles Magazine REVIEWS

The Cow in the Trail

Even in mid-September you cannot go comfortably by day into the deserts of southeastern Utah. Together the late Edward Abbey and I rented horses and rode into the La Sal mountains, following what began as a dirt road and ended as a trail at an...

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    Pire qu'un Crime . . .

    The Pollard treason case is so unusual that I want to start my review of this book with a review of the reviews. I do this because the first-hand story by the Washington correspondent of The Jerusalem Post and the book's equivocal subtitle...

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    Beyond All This

    Philip Larkin, who died in 1985 at the age of 63, has been commonly regarded as the finest English poet of his time. His reputation is founded not merely on the opinion of professional critics but on his remarkable popularity with readers,...

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    A Local Globalist

    Here we have a series of books—two more are planned—that restore to view the literary career of John Gould Fletcher (1886-1950), a writer whose work has been heretofore more often cited than read.

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    Understand Me Completely

    Ordinary people, we are told, ordinarily speak in cliches, bromides, and dotty banalities, and it is the task of the literary artist, of the playwright in particular, to give them expressive and convincing words.

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    The Twenty Years' War

    "Intelligence" may offer the clearest example we have of how ideology can corrupt social science. Although the topic has been politicized by both left and right, during the last generation the ideological pressures have come almost entirely from...

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    The Suez Files

    One reads this book almost with nostalgia. The 1950's, and the dramatic events that occurred during that decade in the Middle East, are the subject of these historically important recollections by Mohamed Heikal, confidant of Gamal Abdel Nasser...

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    A Tour of the Labyrinth

    Hugh Kenner, by day an unassuming professor of English literature at the Johns Hopkins University, is our foremost practitioner of the ancient cult of the maze, a celebrant of this endless labyrinth in which we live.

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    Zorba the Comrade

    Love him or hate him, Nikos Kazantzakis is a force to be reckoned with. Best known in America for Zorba the Greek and The Last Temptation of Christ, Kazantzakis wrote what many consider to be the greatest epic poem of the 20th century, The...

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    Learning to Behave

    When I heard on the radio one morning in 1974 that Friedrich Hayek had won the Nobel Prize in economics, my first thought was, "Not our Friedrich Hayek?" A few hours later, upon meeting a libertarian acquaintance of some prominence, I asked, "Did...

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    The Terrestrial God

    It all depends on what we mean by "sacralizing" and "sacred," and to a lesser extent by "secular." The fact that Professor McKnight is a student of Eric Voegelin should not be left unmentioned in this regard, because for the recently deceased...

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