Chronicles Magazine November 1987

  • Perspective

    On Might

    Walt Whitman sang what he saw—in 1860, he gave a name to Madison's and Jefferson's vision of the new commonwealth. "[Our success]," Jefferson had said in 1801, "furnishes a new proof of the falsehood of Montesquieu's doctrine, that a republic can...

    Read More
  • VIEWS

    The War Years

    World War II seems both near and far away. In one sense, it seems like only yesterday that I was 17 years old, in uniform, and in Georgia and California. In another sense, that period is ancient history. We have traversed a century or more in...

    Read More
  • VIEWS

    Military History: Vital, Neglected

    Polybius was the most perceptive chronicler of Rome's rise to greatness. He concentrated on political and military history not merely to record the facts or to entertain an audience, but to provide lessons for the statesman. Today, however,...

    Read More
  • REVIEWS

    An American Prometheus

    Sprawled on the sands of the New Mexico desert, Isador Isaac Rabi was witness on July 16, 1945, to a demonstration of scientific power so spectacular that neither his welder's glasses nor his analytical training could fully shield him from its...

    Read More
  • REVIEWS

    Selling Out

    On November 29, 1984, an FBI agent in Massachusetts took extensive notes from a long conversation with an alcoholic woman about the alleged Soviet spy activities of her former husband, John Walker.

    Read More
  • REVIEWS

    West Beats East

    Along with Xenophon and Plutarch, Herodotus may be the most underappreciated writer of antiquity. His Histories (by which he meant something like "investigations") of the relations between Greeks and barbarians has more narrative power than most...

    Read More
  • REVIEWS

    States of Nature

    A renaissance of American interest in contemporary Africa has been stimulated by media blitzes on famine-ridden Ethiopia and politically volatile South Africa, and by an award- winning film about a Norwegian adulteress's African farm.

    Read More
  • Correspondence

    AIDS and Public Morality

    The AIDS plague should be approached temperately because, like the Kennedy assassination, it is one of those universally frightening phenomena that is likely to ignite the pool of vulgarity, hysteria, and kookery that lie just below the surface,...

    Read More
  • VITAL SIGNS

    Resolutely Abstract

    The avant-garde, according to those who are supposed to know, has been entering the mainstream, but the commentators busy cataloging this development for future art historians seem to have forgotten that "avant-garde" and "mainstream" are...

    Read More
  • VITAL SIGNS

    Summer of the Snake

    In "Life-Line," a story by Robert A. Heinlein, a scientist describes a man in the present as a "space-time event." He explains, "Imagine this space-time event which we call Rogers as a long pink worm, continuous through the years, one end at his...

    Read More
  • Cultural Revolutions

    Betraying His Country

    Convicted traitor Clayton Lonetree wept as he described his upbringing on an Indian reservation orphanage and with his father, a brutal alcoholic. The Marine Corps was, he said, a way out of his misery, although his principal reasons for joining...

    Read More