Chronicles Magazine Literature

Old Adam, New Eve

Feminist writers sometimes give us the impression that the nonworking mother is a rare bird like the Bach man's Warbler—sighted (not very reliably) once a decade or so in a corner of I'on Swamp in the South Carolina low country.

Read More
  • REVIEWS

    Out On a Limb

    Kingsley Amis has been practicing the writer's trade long enough to have produced a full shelf of books. Last year's Stanley and the Women was not only his 17th novel but a signal that three decades have suddenly elapsed since the publication in...

    Read More
  • REVIEWS

    Companion to Coleridge

    In graceful prose not unworthy of his subject, the distinguished English biographer Lord David Cecil paints an endearing portrait of "St. Charles," as Thackeray was later to call Lamb. Saint he was, certainly, and sinner, too.

    Read More
  • REVIEWS

    Pedantry and Progress

    He wrote one of the most distinctive and original prose styles of his time, paralleling the techniques of his Yankee contemporary, Henry James, anticipating those of Pound and Eliot.

    Read More
  • REVIEWS

    Getting America Right

    American novelists no longer write about America. That, at least, was the judgment of many foreign writers who attended the recent PEN Conference. It would be hard to make the same complaint about our poets.

    Read More
  • REVIEWS

    Stage Props & Program Notes

    Eugene O'Neill's life was a purgatory, as he never ceased informing us. His final plays, those written or revised from 1939 on, leave us with a vision of him plodding at last toward the top of that inverted mountain, the man emerging from his...

    Read More