Chronicles Magazine REVIEWS

The Poet and the Plowman

Surprisingly often we talked about Vergil, usually about the Aeneid, but sometimes about the Georgics, and then with the wry sentimental fondness of old students who had been made, not quite willingly, to go to school to the poem.

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    In the Land of Cotton

    When we write of Southern rural life (as when we write of Southern speech, manners, history, or literature) we essay a phenomenon significantly different from that which would normally be suggested were the modifier "Southern" to be replaced by...

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    Haunted by Yesterday

    Nothing is more dangerous for the critic than taking a book cover at face value. But when the blurbs compare the author to William Faulkner, Flannery O'Connor, Walker Percy, and Saul Bellow, the challenge is irresistible.

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    Hillbillies and Rednecks

    Two professors at Mississippi State University, a sociologist and a communicationist, have decoupaged their observations, experiences, and intrapsychic projections into a "phenomenological analysis" of The Southern Redneck.

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    The Re-Possessed

    Among other, more profound things, Dostoevski's anti-revolutionary novel, The Possessed, is a withering dissection of liberal intellectuals. In its pages, liberals parade as hostile and irresponsible critics of a society that affords most of them...

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    Pastor to the Pariahs

    Dramatic conversions happen. F.F. Bruce, the noted New Testament scholar, is not alone in insisting that no one can understand Paul of Tarsus without considering his experience on the road to Damascus.

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    The Maze of Metaphor

    Jacques Derrida has in recent years made himself one of the most influential figures in literary criticism on American college campuses. The movement he has inspired, alternately known as "deconstruction" or "poststructuralism," asserts that all...

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